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Heart of Darkness

Joseph Conrad

Suggestions for Further Reading

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How to Cite This SparkNote

Achebe, Chinua. “ ‘An Image of Africa’: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness.” In Heart of Darkness: An Authoritative Text, Backgrounds and Sources, Criticism, ed. Robert Kimbrough. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1988.

Bloom, Harold, ed. Marlow. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1992.

Cheng, Yuan-Jung. Heralds of the Postmodern: Madness and Fiction in Conrad, Woolf, and Lessing. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 1999.

Eagleton, Terry. Criticism and Ideology: A Study in Marxist Literary Theory. London: Verso, reprint edition 2006.

Firchow, Peter Edgerly. Envisioning Africa: Racism and Imperialism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2000.

Guetti, James L. The Limits of Metaphor: A Study of Melville, Conrad, and Faulkner. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1967.

Navarette, Susan J. The Shape of Fear: Horror and the Fin de Siecle Culture of Decadence. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.

Stape, J. H., ed. The Cambridge Companion to Joseph Conrad. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

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Middle Class Values

by AnimeObsessedPokemonMaster, March 01, 2013

It would be good to note the relationship of this text to middle class values, such as the idea of morals or nationalism.

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3 out of 7 people found this helpful

Nature/Wilderness

by artbn, November 20, 2013

Nature or the wilderness is also an important motif. I believe the sparknotes team should look into it. It is evident by its consumption of Kurtz, its whispers, and its maternal feelings toward the natives.

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6 out of 6 people found this helpful

I dont think the whited sepulchar is a symbol

by PeanutJoe, December 04, 2013

I would honestly consider the whited sepulcher to be more of a Biblical allusion than a symbol...

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5 out of 7 people found this helpful

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