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Like Water for Chocolate

Laura Esquivel

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How to Cite This SparkNote

Carpentier, Alejo. "On the Marvelous Real in America," in Magical Realism: Theory, History, Community. Lois Parkinson Zamora, and Wendy B. Faris, eds. Durham: Duke UP, 1995.

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Love in the Time of Cholera. New York: Penguin, 1988.

Herrera, Hayden. Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo. New York: Harper Perennial Library, 1991.

Paz, Octavio. The Labyrinth of Solitude: Life and Thought in Mexico. New York: Grove Press, 1961.

Schaefer, Claudia. Textured Lives: Women, Art, and Representation in Modern Mexico. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1992.

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Feminism

by kat_salle, December 05, 2016

Violence is another trait that is not in tune with the female ideal in Mexico during the Mexican revolution, where only men are expected to be aggressive. However, while Mama Elena’s masculinity can be perceived as her having an unfavorable character, there might be an underlying reason for her becoming so hard and unyielding. It is possible that she decided to take on the role of household patriarch to keep a sense of stability on the ranch. During the Mexican revolution many women found themselves head of the household after their husban... Read more

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Magical Realism through cooking

by macbeth_1, December 05, 2016

"Something strange was going on. Tita remembered that Nacha had always said that when people argue while preparing tamales, the tamales won’t get cooked. They can be heated day after day and still stay raw, because the tamales are angry. In a case like that, you have to sing to them, which makes them happy, then they’ll cook."

218-219
Rosaura and Tita get into a heated argument when Rosaura accuses Tita of sneaking around with Pedro and prohibits Tita from having any more to do with Esperanza. The intensity of their argument... Read more

Passion in Like Water for Chocolate

by sravsa, December 05, 2016

The romantic love that is so exalted throughout the novel is forbidden by Tita's mother in order to blindly enforce the tradition that the youngest daughter be her mother's chaste guardian. However, the traditional etiquette enforced by Mama Elena is defied progressively throughout the novel. This parallels the setting of the Mexican Revolution growing in intensity. The novel further parallels the Mexican Revolution because during the Mexican Revolution the power of the country was in the hands of a select few and the people had no power to ... Read more