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The Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas

Chapters 85–88

Chapters 77–84

Chapters 85–88, page 2

page 1 of 2

Chapter 85: Beauchamp

Beauchamp arrives at Albert’s home with bad news. He has just returned from a voyage to Yanina, where he has found incontrovertible proof of the allegations against Morcerf. Beauchamp promises to suppress this information due to his friendship with Albert. Albert is devastated by the revelation regarding his father but grateful to Beauchamp, whom he now forgives.

Chapter 86: The Journey

Monte Cristo invites Albert to travel with him to his home in Normandy. They spend three pleasant days at the coast before an urgent letter from Beauchamp summons Albert back to Paris. The letter includes a newspaper clipping, from a paper other than Beauchamp’s, that links Morcerf’s name with the Ali Pacha affair. Now there can no longer be any doubt that Albert’s father is in fact the man accused of betraying Ali.

Chapter 87: The Trial

Albert arrives at Beauchamp’s house demanding information. Beauchamp tells him all he knows: a man came from Yanina bearing a stack of condemning documents and gave them to a rival newspaper editor. Since the article was printed, something even more damning has taken place. At the daily meeting of the Chamber, the government body to which Morcerf belongs, it was decided that an extensive investigation should be opened into the matter. At Morcerf’s request, the investigation was set to begin that evening.

Beauchamp tells Albert that during the hearing, Haydée appeared and testified that Morcerf betrayed her father, Ali Pacha. She claimed that Morcerf allowed her father to be killed by his enemies, stole his treasures, and then sold Haydée and her mother into slavery. Haydée presented a document recording the fact that Monte Cristo had purchased her from the dealer who purchased her from Fernand Mondego. The document mentioned Mondego by name. Haydée further supported her claim by asserting that her father’s betrayer had a scar on his right hand, a scar that Morcerf possesses. The judges of the Chamber subsequently found Morcerf guilty of the crimes alleged.

Chapter 88: The Challenge

Albert swears to Beauchamp that he will kill the man responsible for his father’s disgrace or die trying. Beauchamp tries to dissuade Albert, but fails. He agrees to help Albert track down his enemy and, to that end, confides that Danglars had been making inquiries about Morcerf in Yanina.

Albert rushes to Danglars’s house and challenges both Danglars and Andrea Cavalcanti to a duel. Danglars tells Albert that it was Monte Cristo who suggested he write to Yanina. Albert then realizes that Monte Cristo must have known all along about his father’s past, since he has known all along about Haydée’s past. He deduces that Monte Cristo must be behind the plot to expose his father and decides that Monte Cristo is the one he must challenge to a duel.

More Help

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Sultan of Monte Cristo-The Sequel

by keitht7, July 15, 2012

The Sultan of Monte Cristo is a return to the great classic writing of

the late 19th century.Written as a sequel to the long time loved and

treasured adventure novel The Count of Monte Cristo,Sultan of

Monte Cristo pays great tribute to the original by remaining full of

intrigue and adding more seductive romance with the harem of the

The many exploites of the Sultan leaves you wondering how could

this astonishing work of literary art be so captivating while keeping

to the ... Read more


25 out of 81 people found this helpful


by KingSize4, May 02, 2013

This for the full version if your not reading the full version this will get you even more confused than the book does. The Count of Monte Christo is a good book but not when your confused about the Plot i'm in the middle of reading it and think the spark notes really help.


6 out of 10 people found this helpful

Not done yet- Many Characters

by thereader77, October 16, 2013

Keep track of the many characters in this novel - the notes so far are far off from the chapter notes. Chapters listed here are incorrect. wait for further notes.


2 out of 2 people found this helpful

See all 4 readers' notes   →