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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

J. K. Rowling

Suggestions for Further Reading

Quiz

How to Cite This SparkNote

Anatol, Giselle Liza, ed. Reading Harry Potter: Critical Essays. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2003.

Badgett, David et al. Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts. La Salle, IL: Open Court, 2004.

Beahm, George et al. Fact, Fiction, and Folklore in Harry Potter's World: An Unofficial Guide. Charlottesville, VA: Hampton Roads Publishing Company, 2005.

Bridger, Francis. A Charmed Life: The Spirituality of Potterworld. New York: Image Books, 2002.

Gupta, Suman. Re-Reading Harry Potter. New York: Palgrave Macmillian, 2003.

Heilman, Elizabeth E., ed. Harry Potter’s World: Multidisciplinary Critical Perspectives. New York: RoutledgeFalmer, 2003.

Granger, John. Looking for God in Harry Potter. Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2004.

Shapiro, Marc. J. K. Rowling: The Wizard Behind Harry Potter. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin, 2000.

Whited, Lanaa, ed. The Ivory Tower and Harry Potter. Columbia, MS: University of Missouri Press, 2002.

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Vocab Q

by jackokay, March 08, 2014

How can harry walk away stoically if he's shows he furious about his wand being broken by Hermione?

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2 out of 4 people found this helpful

Friendship

by alexviola7, December 08, 2015

Because Harry is very close to Hermione, he doesn't want to look upset and make her feel bad. Also, he knows that there is no way to fix it, so he doesn't want to waste his time moping around. He has to focus on more important things like the horcruxes. He is upset about it, but will just deal with it quietly without hurting Hermione's feelings.