A Tale of Two Cities

by: Charles Dickens

Original Text

Modern Text

“I see that child who lay upon her bosom and who bore my name, a man winning his way up in that path of life which once was mine. I see him winning it so well, that my name is made illustrious there by the light of his. I see the blots I threw upon it, faded away. I see him, fore-most of just judges and honoured men, bringing a boy of my name, with a forehead that I know and golden hair, to this place—then fair to look upon, with not a trace of this day’s disfigurement—and I hear him tell the child my story, with a tender and a faltering voice. “I see that child who lay on Lucie’s breast and who was named after me becoming a man and succeeding as a lawyer. I see him being so successful that he brings honor to my name by his actions. I see the damage I had done to my name through my bad behavior fade away. I see him, the best of just judges and honored men, having a boy and naming it after me. The boy has a wrinkled forehead and blond hair like Lucie’s. I see him bringing the boy here, which by then is a beautiful place without a trace of the guillotine to be seen. I hear him tell the child my story tenderly and emotionally.
“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.” “It is a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done. It is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”