Skip over navigation

The Canterbury Tales

Original Text

Modern Text







660


The folk gan laughen at his fantasye;
In-to the roof they kyken and they gape,
And turned al his harm unto a Iape.
For what so that this carpenter answerde,
It was for noght, no man his reson herde;
With othes grete he was so sworn adoun,
That he was holden wood in al the toun;
For every clerk anon-right heeld with other.
They seyde, ‘the man is wood, my leve brother;’
And every wight gan laughen of this stryf.
The neighbors laughed hysterically when they heard the carpenter’s story. They poked their heads inside the house to look up at the other two tubs hanging from the ceiling and chuckled. Try as he might, though, the carpenter couldn’t get anyone to believe what had really happened. From then on he was known throughout town as the crazy carpenter, and everyone swore at him, made fun of him, and spread rumors about him.




Thus swyved was the carpenteres wyf,
For al his keping and his Ialousye;
And Absolon hath kist hir nether yë;
And Nicholas is scalded in the toute.
This tale is doon, and God save al the route!
And that is how the carpenter’s wife was screwed, for all the carpenter’s watchfulness and paranoia; how Absolom kissed her nether eye; and how Nicholas got his ass burned. Thank you, and God bless every one of us!
HERE ENDETH THE MILLERE HIS TALE.
THIS IS THE END OF THE MILLER’S TALE.

More Help

Previous Next