Henry V

by: William Shakespeare

Original Text

Modern Text

CONSTABLE

Mine was not bridled.

CONSTABLE

Mine wasn’t wearing a bridle.

DAUPHIN

Oh, then belike she was old and gentle, and you rode, like a kern of Ireland, your French hose off and in your straight strossers.

DAUPHIN

Oh, then I guess she was old and gentle, and you rode barelegged, like an Irish yokel.

CONSTABLE

You have good judgment in horsemanship.

CONSTABLE

You’re a good judge of horsemanship.

DAUPHIN

Be warned by me, then: they that ride so, and ride not warily, fall into foul bogs. I had rather have my horse to my mistress.

DAUPHIN

Take a tip from me, then. Those who don’t take care when they ride often find themselves thrown into a messy situation. I’d rather have my horse than a mistress.

CONSTABLE

I had as lief have my mistress a jade.

CONSTABLE

I’d prefer to keep my mistress rather than some lame horse.

DAUPHIN

I tell thee, Constable, my mistress wears his own hair.

DAUPHIN

I’ll tell you this, Constable, my mistress has his own hair.

CONSTABLE

I could make as true a boast as that if I had a sow to my mistress.

CONSTABLE

I could make the same boast even if I had a pig as my mistress.

DAUPHIN

55“Le chien est retourné à son propre vomissement, et la truie lavée au bourbier.” Thou mak’st use of anything.

DAUPHIN

“The dog returns to its own vomit, and the newly washed sow to its mud puddle.”
You’d take anything for a mistress.

CONSTABLE

Yet do I not use my horse for my mistress, or any such proverb so little kin to the purpose.

CONSTABLE

At least I don’t have a horse for my mistress—or a saying so beside the point.

RAMBURES

My Lord Constable, the armor that I saw in your tent tonight, are those stars or suns upon it?

RAMBURES

My Lord Constable, are those stars or suns I saw on the armor in your tent tonight?

CONSTABLE

Stars, my lord.

CONSTABLE

Stars, my lord.

DAUPHIN

Some of them will fall tomorrow, I hope.

DAUPHIN

I hope some will fall off tomorrow.