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Donne’s Poetry

John Donne

“The Broken Heart”

Themes, Motifs and Symbols

“The Broken Heart”, page 2

page 1 of 2


The speaker declares that any man who claims he has been in love for an hour is insane; not because love “decays” in so short a time, but because, in an hour, love can “devour” ten men—in other words, not because love itself is destroyed in an hour, but because it will destroy the lover in much less time than that. To explain himself, the speaker uses an analogy: He says that anyone who heard him claim to have had the plague for an entire year would disbelieve him because the plague would have killed him in much less time than that. He also says that anyone who heard him claim to have seen a flask of gunpowder burn for an entire day would laugh at him because the flask would have exploded immediately. Like the plague and the powder-flask, love works violently and swiftly.

“What a trifle is a heart,” the speaker says, “If once into Love’s hands it come!” Unlike love, other feelings and “other griefs” do not demand the entire heart, only a part of it. Other griefs “come to us” but Love draws us to it, swallowing us whole. Masses of people are felled by Love as ranks of soldiers are felled by chain-shot. Love is like a ravenous pike, and our hearts are like the small fish it feasts on.

Addressing his beloved, the speaker asks her a question: If what he says about love is false, then what happened to his heart the first time he saw her? He says that he entered the room with a heart, and left the room without one. If his heart had been captured whole by his beloved, he says, it would have taught her to treat him more kindly; instead, the impact of love shattered his heart “as glass.”

Still, he says, a thing cannot be so utterly destroyed that it becomes nothing; the pieces of his shattered heart are still in his breast. In the same way that a broken mirror reflects “a hundred lesser faces,” the speaker says that his “rags of heart” can “like, wish, and adore”; but after experiencing the shock of “one such love,” they can never love again.


The four regular stanzas of “The Broken Heart” utilize Donne’s characteristically angular iambic meters; each stanza is eight lines long, with lines one, two, three, five, and six in iambic tetrameter, and lines four, seven, and eight in iambic pentameter. (The line-stress pattern, therefore, is 44454455 in each stanza.) Each stanza follows a rhyme scheme of ABABCCDD.


“The Broken Heart” is an excellent example of Donne’s style in his metaphysical mode, transforming a relatively simple idea (that love destroys the hearts that feel it) into an oblique, elaborate meditation full of startling images (the burning powder-flask, love as a carnivorous fish) and implications. Structurally, the poem looks at its theme from a different angle in each of its stanzas. The first stanza is metaphorical and explanatory, establishing the basic idea of the poem by showing that to be in love for an entire hour would be like having the plague for a year or seeing a flask of gunpowder burn for an entire day; love is instant, like the explosion of the flask. The second stanza personifies love as a kind of monster that destroys human beings, trifling with hearts, swallowing men whole (he “never chaws”), killing whole ranks, and devouring men as a pike devours smaller fish (“He is the tyrant pike, our hearts the fry”).

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the sun rising

by wannabeEngTea, August 22, 2013

the sun rising


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Q. Discuss John Donne as a metaphysical poet.

by touhidsm, April 30, 2014

Answer: Metaphysical poetry refers to a type of very intellectual poetry that was common in the 17th century. This type of poetry was known for bold and ingenious conceits, subtle thought and frequent use of paradox as well as the directness of language. Metaphysical poetry, in an etymological sense, is poetry on subjects which exist beyond the physical world. .... Read the full answer FREEEEE at


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John Donne is a poet of love.

by touhidsm, May 08, 2014

Read the full answer at >>

Answer: Love, the most felt and discussed emotion of human mind, has been a dominant theme of all branches of literature of all ages. But the treatment of love has been different from writers to writers, from poets to poets. John Donne has also used ‘love’ to be an important theme of his poetry. Since love may be different from man to man, time to time, Donne has also treated realistically love to... Read more


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