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Keats’s Odes

John Keats

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The best single work on Keats’s odes is Helen Vendler’s study The Odes of John Keats. Many of the ideas in this summary were first and best expressed in that book, and anyone wishing to learn more about the odes will want to read it.

Vendler, Helen. The Odes of John Keats. Cambridge: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1983.

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No real analysis on this page

by cliffordh, February 07, 2014

This is just something i want to point out. This is more summary than analysis explaining the literal meaning of words is not analysis. Themes and underlying meanings being discussed is analysis

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4 out of 4 people found this helpful

JOHN KEATS, A THINKER IN RELATION TO THE CRITICAL APPRECIATION OF HIS VERSE ‘ODE TO A NIGHTINGALE’.

by Shehanaz, April 21, 2014

(THE WAY I HAVE TAKEN THIS ANSWER):
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Ans. “Here are sweet peas, on tip-toe for a flight
With wings of gentle flush o’er delicate white,
And taper finger catching at all things
To bind them all with tiny rings;”
Keats’s attitude towards nature developed as he grew up. In the early poems, it was a temper of merely sensuous delight, an unanalyzed pleasure in the beauty of nature. “He had away”, says Stopford Brooke, “of fluttering... Read more

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6 out of 9 people found this helpful

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