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Macbeth

William Shakespeare

Key Facts

Important Quotations Explained

Study Questions & Essay Topics

full title ·  The Tragedy of Macbeth

author  · William Shakespeare

type of work  · Play

genre  · Tragedy

language  · English

time and place written  · 1606, England

date of first publication  · First Folio edition, 1623

publisher  · John Heminges and Henry Condell, two senior members of Shakespeare’s theatrical company

tone  · Dark and ominous, suggestive of a world turned topsy-turvy by foul and unnatural crimes

tense  · Not applicable (drama)

setting (time)  · The Middle Ages, specifically the eleventh century

setting (place)  · Various locations in Scotland; also England, briefly

protagonist  · Macbeth

major conflicts  · The struggle within Macbeth between his ambition and his sense of right and wrong; the struggle between the murderous evil represented by Macbeth and Lady Macbeth and the best interests of the nation, represented by Malcolm and Macduff

rising action  · Macbeth and Banquo’s encounter with the witches initiates both conflicts; Lady Macbeth’s speeches goad Macbeth into murdering Duncan and seizing the crown.

climax · Macbeth’s murder of Duncan in Act 2 represents the point of no return, after which Macbeth is forced to continue butchering his subjects to avoid the consequences of his crime.

falling action  · Macbeth’s increasingly brutal murders (of Duncan’s servants, Banquo, Lady Macduff and her son); Macbeth’s second meeting with the witches; Macbeth’s final confrontation with Macduff and the opposing armies

themes  · The corrupting nature of unchecked ambition; the relationship between cruelty and masculinity; the difference between kingship and tyranny

motifs  · The supernatural, hallucinations, violence, prophecy

symbols  · Blood; the dagger that Macbeth sees just before he kills Duncan in Act 2; the weather

foreshadowing · The bloody battle in Act 1 foreshadows the bloody murders later on; when Macbeth thinks he hears a voice while killing Duncan, it foreshadows the insomnia that plagues Macbeth and his wife; Macduff’s suspicions of Macbeth after Duncan’s murder foreshadow his later opposition to Macbeth; all of the witches’ prophecies foreshadow later events.

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Relation between Macbeth and his Supernaturalistic World,including its Impacts.

by Shehanaz, May 21, 2013

By Shehanaz

“Man is not the creature of circumstances

Circumstances are the creatures of man.”

Macbeth, throughout the play, is presented as one much above the ordinary beings, and, as such, he fulfils the basic -requirements of being a tragic hero. Shakespeare, introduces him as a brave general, a bold, resolute man of action who through as also referred to “Valor’s minion”, “Bellona’s bridegroom’’, the king’s ‘’valiant cousin’’, a very “eagle’’ among ... Read more

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Shakespeare Blog

by DanMitchell23, June 07, 2013

How powerful are the women in Macbeth? Come and check out what I have to say...

http://inbetweenthelines1.wordpress.com/2013/04/09/shakespeare-play-macbeth/

1 Comments

3 out of 6 people found this helpful

OF MANY, FEW IMPORTANT QUESTIONS ON PROLOGUE OF EVIL:

by Shehanaz, June 11, 2013

1.How important is the influence of Lady Macbeth on her husband?
2.Do the witches in fact have any power? Refer to the major characters in the play in the context of ‘witch-craft’.
3.Discuss fear and courage prevails throughout the character of Macbeth in the play?
4. Write about the influence of super naturalistic elements that makes the play Macbeth more suspense. 5..Explain briefly the part played by th

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