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Timon of Athens

William Shakespeare

Review Quiz

Study Questions

Further Reading

Who arrives at Timon's house hoping to make a sale?

Timon explains his generosity thus:

Apemantus is:

What favor does Timon do for Ventidius?

Flavius can't talk to his master, Timon, about:

When creditors arrive at Timon's door, Timon asks Flavius:

Timon orders his land sold but:

Flavius thinks once Timon's wealth is gone then:

Timon can't believe Flavius, so he sends servants to his friends asking for loans. But:

Alcibiades gets into an argument with the senate. Why?

Timon throws a last feast and serves:

Timon departs the city for:

Searching for food, Timon discovers:

Alcibiades tells Timon about his plan to attack Athens. Timon responds:

Apemantus visits Timon, claiming he has come to:

Flavius visits Timon and shows himself to be:

Who else visits Timon?

What do Timon's last visitors want?

But Timon's real opinion of mankind remains:

Timon expects to soon:

Alcibiades arrives at Athens's gates with his army. The senators try to defend the city how?

Alcibiades agrees:

But news on Timon arrives:

Timon died believing:

Of Timon, Alcibiades says:

More Help

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Shakespeare does Satire

by ReadingShakespeareby450th, August 19, 2013

Or at least that's what I think he was doing in Timon of Athens. Just finished a blog on my take.

http://ow.ly/o4xXz

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1 out of 1 people found this helpful

Not Satire, But Irony

by BardForKidsdotcom, July 12, 2014

Timon of Athens is an attack on the aristocracy of Elizabethan England, and their hypocritical society. It a play which most "scholars" describe as one of the Bard's "problem plays," but it is easily understood when compared to the real life financial issues suffered by Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford - who is a perfect double for Timon of Athens when it comes to his spending, gifting, partying, and bankruptcy.....

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2 out of 2 people found this helpful

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