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Candide

Voltaire

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Full Bibliographic Citation

MLA

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Candide.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2002. Web. 10 Apr. 2014.

The Chicago Manual of Style

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Candide.” SparkNotes LLC. 2002. http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/candide/ (accessed April 10, 2014).

APA

SparkNotes Editors. (2002). SparkNote on Candide. Retrieved April 10, 2014, from http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/candide/

In Text Citation

MLA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors).

APA

“Their conversation is awkward, especially when she mentions Wickham, a subject Darcy clearly wishes to avoid” (SparkNotes Editors, 2002).

Footnote

The Chicago Manual of Style

Chicago requires the use of footnotes, rather than parenthetical citations, in conjunction with a list of works cited when dealing with literature.

1 SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on Candide.” SparkNotes LLC. 2002. http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/candide/ (accessed April 10, 2014).


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Adam and Eve

by sary56, August 20, 2013

"Moreover, in the Garden of Eden Adam and Eve enjoyed the fruits of nature without having to work..."
I don't think that's true. Genesis 2:15 says, "The LORD God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it." Adam's purpose was to work even before the fall, which happens in Genesis 3. Also, I don't believe that Adam and Eve fell from God's grace. Yes, God said "you shall surely die" if you eat of the fruit, and they did, but it was actually God's grace that made them go out of the garden to prevent them from li... Read more

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16 out of 31 people found this helpful

Life life

by Jekemi, January 05, 2014

What I got from this book is that whether Panglos is right or not. Whether Pessimism or Optimism prevailed, it doesn't do any good to philosophy over it.
Man was placed in the garden to work, not to be idle.

I believe that in the end Candide gave up on arguing - he simply realised the pointlessness of doing it and that true happiness will be by living life without thinking about it the whole time.

Thanks for your post.

Jacques

0 Comments

1 out of 2 people found this helpful

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