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An Enemy of the People

Henrik Ibsen


Act II

Act III, page 2

page 1 of 2


The set is the editorial office at the People's Herald. Hovstad is writing at the desk. Billing enters with Dr. Stockmann's report. They discuss the doctor's powerful writing and how they hope to use it to attack the government. Aslaksen is in the other room, and they are careful not to let him hear. Hovstad is excited, because if the mayor accepts the doctor's proposal, he will face the fury of the big stockholders, and if he rejects it, he will face the giant Homeowners Association.

Dr. Stockmann enters and tells them about his argument with the mayor. The three are excited to "tear down" the current administration. Aslaksen enters, and they assure him that both the radicals and the moderates will want to support the doctor. The doctor asks him to pay special attention to his report to make sure that are no typos or mistakes. The doctor is deeply moved by their support and encouragement.

After he leaves, Hovstad and Aslaksen agree that Dr. Stockmann will be very useful to them, although for different reasons. Aslaksen is worried that the doctor is not prudent enough, but Hovstad wants to use him as a political firebrand. Changing the subject, Aslaksen mentions that Governor Stensgard sat in Hovstad's editor's chair before him. Billing says something about mixing radical journalism and politics, and Aslaksen reminds Billing that he himself is running for council secretary. Billing assures them that he is only doing it to annoy the establishment.

Aslaksen steps out, and Billing and Hovstad discuss how much they would like to get rid of him. They depend on him because he lets them print on credit. They wonder whether Dr. Stockmann might be able to help finance the paper. He will likely become wealthy, since the rich Morten Kiil will probably remember the Stockmanns in his will. Billing leaves and Petra enters. She had agreed to translate an English story for the paper, but now she refuses, on the grounds that its content is against everything for which the paper stands. The article is about a higher purpose guiding people's actions. Hovstad replies that Billing, who Petra is in some manner courting, thought the piece would be good fodder to keep the paper's simpler readers happy. Petra is shocked to hear that Billing would be so calculating, and Hovstad also mentions Billing's run for secretary. Petra still refuses to do the piece, but she thanks Hovstad for his support of her father. He implies that it makes it easier that she is his daughter, and Petra leaves, disgusted.

The mayor arrives, to Hovstad's surprise. The mayor comments on how nicely the paper is set up. He begins to talk about the doctor's proposal for the baths, but Hovstad plays dumb, until the mayor notices the doctor's report laying on the desk. The mayor tells Hovstad and Aslaksen that if the doctor's plan for the baths goes through, it will mean a huge sacrifice for the town. The expenses will have to come out of a municipal loan, and the baths will have to be shut down for two years. Hovstad and Aslaksen begin to change their minds about supporting Dr. Stockmann. The mayor assures them that the doctor's report is pure fantasy. Suddenly, they see that Dr. Stockmann himself is approaching, and the mayor hides in a side room.

The doctor wants to see the proofs of his article, but they're not yet ready. He expresses to the two men that if any kind of celebration is being planned in his honor, he wants them to put a stop to it. Just as Hovstad is trying to tell the doctor how things really stand, Mrs. Stockmann enters. She has come to tell Dr. Stockmann not to throw away the livelihood of his family by printing his article. The doctor reminds her that he has the solid majority behind him, and she tells him that it's a horrible thing to have behind him. He tells her to go home while he worries about society. Then, he notices the mayor's ceremonial hat and cane lying on a chair. He guesses that the mayor is nearby, puts on the hat, and begins to parade about the office, until the mayor comes out in a fury. The doctor mocks his brother, convinced that he has everyone's support.

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my notes... important

by SHEKOOFEH493, September 04, 2012

• The term “freethinking” is used often in the play… almost every characters except the mayor and Aslaksan are freethinkers.
• It is not Ibsen’s intent to create a play of food vs. Evil.
• The play is written in the late 19th century
• The play in many ways is about the extent to which the individual innocence can survive in modern society
• In 3rd act we see that the newspaper men are against him.
• Hovstad is not a reliable character, his support is for his attraction to Petra
• The... Read more


94 out of 113 people found this helpful


by oksana2411, May 16, 2014

I hate bullies

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