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The Handmaid’s Tale

Margaret Atwood

Suggestions for Further Reading

A Glossary of Terms Used in The Handmaid’s Tale

How to Cite This SparkNote

Briscoe, Lee Thompson. Scarlet Letters: Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. Toronto: ECW Press, 1997.

Ingersoll, Earl G., ed. Margaret Atwood: Conversations. Princeton, New Jersey: Ontario Review Press, 1990.

McCombs, Judith, ed. Critical Essays on Margaret Atwood. Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1988.

Rao, Eleonora. Strategies for Identity: The Fiction of Margaret Atwood. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 1994.

Staels, Hilda. Margaret Atwood’s Novels: A Study of Narrative Discourse. Tubingen, Germany: Francke Verlag, 1995.

Wilson, Sharon Rose. Margaret Atwood’s Fairy-Tale Sexual Politics. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1993.

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Cigarettes

by sidlaecarg, October 15, 2013

Offred's thoughts about cigarettes in her new life and the memory of smoking them in her old provides another symbol for control of women's bodies and choices in the Gilead regime. She is a former smoker, but her cigarettes are taken away from her along with many other freedoms when she becomes a handmaid. Offred can no longer smoke because this might harm any children she has yet to bear, though she still yearns for another cigarette whenever she sees one. Offred yearns for the freedoms her old life had to offer. Gilead's removal of cigaret... Read more

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