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The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway

Suggestions for Further Reading

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How to Cite This SparkNote

Anderson, Charles R. Ernest Hemingway: Critiques of Four Major Novels. Ed. Carlos Baker. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1962.

Benson, Jackson J. “Roles and the Masculine Writer.” In Brett Ashley, edited by Harold Bloom, 76–85. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1991.

Burgess, Anthony. Ernest Hemingway and His World. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1978.

Farrell, James T. “The Sun Also Rises.” In Ernest Hemingway: The Man and His Work, edited by John K. M. McCaffery, 221–225. New York: The World Publishing Company, 1950.

Goodman, Paul. Ernest Hemingway: Five Decades of Criticism. Ed. Linda Welshimer Wagner. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1974.

Gurko, Leo. Ernest Hemingway and the Pursuit of Heroism. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1968.

Vance, William L. “Implications of Form in The Sun Also Rises.” In The Twenties: Poetry and Prose: Twenty Critical Essays, edited by Richard E. Langford and William E. Taylor, 87–91. Florida: Everett Edwords Press, 1966.

Voss, Arthur. The American Short Story: A Critical Survey. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1973.

Waldhorn, Arthur. A Reader’s Guide to Ernest Hemingway. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1972.

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raising the baton in the last paragraph

by shishijoy, August 20, 2012

I believe that the raised baton also refers to the fact that Jake is impotent and he and Brett will never have the relationship that they both desire.

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32 out of 44 people found this helpful

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