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Frost’s Early Poems

Robert Frost

General Info

Context

Summary

Themes, Motifs & Symbols

Summary and Analysis

“Mowing”

“The Tuft of Flowers”

“Mending Wall”

Home Burial

“After Apple-Picking”

“The Wood-Pile”

“The Road Not Taken”

“Birches”

“Fire and Ice”

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”

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my interpretation

by mistyplayitplease, September 11, 2012

He is dying--right here right now falling down dead and is wondering if it will be a bad thing like the ice falling and breaking or the apples falling and going to the cider heap. He spent a lifetime picking apples and now is his natural moment of death. This is my interpretation of the poem and what frost is conveying in this poem.

9 Comments

20 out of 88 people found this helpful

Re: you statement: "Neither of the roads is less traveled by."

by emma_on, October 25, 2012

Re: you statement: Neither of the roads is less traveled by.

Take a look at the second stanza:

Then took the other, as just as fair
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;

Meaning the other was not grassy, and more worn. I.e. more travelled by.

7 Comments

12 out of 54 people found this helpful

Frost and the Civil War

by ReadingShakespearefor450th, March 19, 2013

Interesting fact about Frost is that he was named for Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Not what you'd expect in a "New Englander."

http://ow.ly/jdTvg

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