Paradise Lost

by: John Milton

Book IX, lines 1–403

1

He circled, four times cross’d the car of night From pole to pole traversing each colure; On th’ eighth return’d, and on the coast, averse From entrance or cherubic watch, by stealth Found unsuspected way. There was a place, Now not, though sin, not time, first wrought the change. Where Tigris at the foot of Paradise Into a gulf shot under ground, till part Rose up a fountain by the tree of life; In with the river sunk, and with it rose Satan involv’d in rising mist[.] (IX, 65–75)

2

So saying, through each thicket, dank or dry, Like a black mist low creeping, he held on His midnight search, where soonest he might find The serpent: him fast sleeping soon he found In labyrinth of many a round self roll’d, His head the midst, well stor’d with subtle wiles. Not yet in horrid shade or dismal den, Nor nocent yet, but on the grassy herb, Fearless unfear’d he slept: in at his mouth The Devil enter’d, and his brutal sense, In heart, or head, possessing, soon inspir’d With act intelligential; but his sleep Disturb’d not, waiting close th’approach of morn. (IX, 179–191)

3

Thus saying, from her husbands’ hand her hand Soft she withdrew, and like a wood-nymph light Oread or Dryad, or of Delia’s train, Betook her to the groves, but Delia’s self In gait surpass’d, and goddess-like deport; Though not as she, with bow and quiver arm’d, But with such gard’ning tools as Art yet rude, Guiltless of fire had form’d, or angels brought. (IX, 385–392)