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Dante Alighieri

Cantos I–II

Themes, Motifs & Symbols

Cantos I–II, page 2

page 1 of 3

Summary: Canto I

Midway on our life’s journey, I found myself
In dark woods, the right road lost.

(See Important Quotations Explained)

Halfway through his life, the poet Dante finds himself wandering alone in a dark forest, having lost his way on the “true path” (I.10). He says that he does not remember how he lost his way, but he has wandered into a fearful place, a dark and tangled valley. Above, he sees a great hill that seems to offer protection from the shadowed glen. The sun shines down from this hilltop, and Dante attempts to climb toward the light. As he climbs, however, he encounters three angry beasts in succession—a leopard, a lion, and a she-wolf—which force him to turn back.

Returning in despair to the dark valley, Dante sees a human form in the woods, which soon reveals itself to be the spirit, or shade, of the great Roman poet Virgil. Thrilled to meet the poet that he most admires, Dante tells Virgil about the beasts that blocked his path. Virgil replies that the she-wolf kills all who approach her but that, someday, a magnificent hound will come to chase the she-wolf back to Hell, where she originated. He adds that the she-wolf’s presence necessitates the use of a different path to ascend the hill; he offers to serve as Dante’s guide. He warns Dante, however, that before they can climb the hill they must first pass through the place of eternal punishment (Hell) and then a place of lesser punishment (Purgatory); only then can they reach God’s city (Heaven). Encouraged by Virgil’s assurances, Dante sets forth with his guide.

Summary: Canto II

Dante invokes the Muses, the ancient goddesses of art and poetry, and asks them to help him tell of his experiences.

Dante relates that as he and Virgil approach the mouth of Hell, his mind turns to the journey ahead and again he feels the grip of dread. He can recall only two men who have ever ventured into the afterlife and returned: the Apostle Paul, who visited the Third Circle of Heaven, and Aeneas, who travels through Hell in Virgil’s Aeneid. Dante considers himself less worthy than these two and fears that he may not survive his passage through Hell.

Virgil rebukes Dante for his cowardice and then reassures him with the story of how he knew to find Dante and act as his guide. According to Virgil, a woman in Heaven took pity upon Dante when he was lost and came down to Hell (where Virgil lives) to ask Virgil to help him. This woman was Beatrice, Dante’s departed love, who now has an honored place among the blessed. She had learned of Dante’s plight from St. Lucia, also in Heaven, who in turn heard about the poor poet from an unnamed lady, most likely the Virgin Mary. Thus, a trio of holy women watches over Dante from above. Virgil says that Beatrice wept as she told him of Dante’s misery and that he found her entreaty deeply moving.

Dante feels comforted to hear that his beloved Beatrice has gone to Heaven and cares so much for him. He praises both her and Virgil for their aid and then continues to follow Virgil toward Hell.

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another thing:

by yummymeats, March 17, 2013

in Christian and Jewish tradition, Satan was an angel who betrayed his benefactor (God). i think that this makes fraud rather suitable as the 9th circle and also explains his bat wings.


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by ras9234, December 05, 2013

In the 3rd circle of Dante's Inferno, the Gluttonous are torn apart(eaten) by Cerberus the three-headed dog. Flatters are found in the 8th circle and they are who is plunged in excrement. They were full of it in life so they are full of it in death.


1 out of 2 people found this helpful

The full title.

by Allytheavenger, December 14, 2013

The full title is actually. Dante Alighieri, Florentine by Citizenship, Not by Morals


2 out of 3 people found this helpful

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