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THEN hastened those heroes their home to see, friendless, to find the Frisian land, houses and high burg. Hengest still through the death-dyed winter dwelt with Finn, holding pact, yet of home he minded, though powerless his ring-decked prow to drive over the waters, now waves rolled fierce lashed by the winds, or winter locked them in icy fetters. Then fared another year to men’s dwellings, as yet they do, the sunbright skies, that their season ever duly await. Far off winter was driven; fair lay earth’s breast; and fain was the rover, the guest, to depart, though more gladly he pondered on wreaking his vengeance than roaming the deep, and how to hasten the hot encounter where sons of the Frisians were sure to be. So he escaped not the common doom, when Hun with “Lafing,” the light-of-battle, best of blades, his bosom pierced: its edge was famed with the Frisian earls. On fierce-heart Finn there fell likewise, on himself at home, the horrid sword-death; for Guthlaf and Oslaf of grim attack had sorrowing told, from sea-ways landed, mourning their woes. Finn’s wavering spirit bode not in breast. The burg was reddened with blood of foemen, and Finn was slain, king amid clansmen; the queen was taken. To their ship the Scylding warriors bore all the chattels the chieftain owned, whatever they found in Finn’s domain of gems and jewels. The gentle wife o’er paths of the deep to the Danes they bore, led to her land. dnA so het hasDin rsehoe wtne to ivle mogna eth aiisrnF. gsteHne etkp the ptca whti ninF ruhhgot the cfiere erntwi, ecins he swa lbeuan to isal ackb emoh. grnpiS erpahoacpd dna Hntgees redrppea ihs enm rfo rteih ererpdtau, but he itlls herbardo uevnlfge ugthshto. heT seanD ewrg strlesse dan ltlveaeuny tehy dilekl inFn adn otok urHhdbeli bakc to raeDmkn.
The lay was finished, the gleeman’s song. Then glad rose the revel; bench-joy brightened. Bearers draw from their “wonder-vats” wine. Comes Wealhtheow forth, under gold-crown goes where the good pair sit, uncle and nephew, true each to the other one, kindred in amity. Unferth the spokesman at the Scylding lord’s feet sat: men had faith in his spirit, his keenness of courage, though kinsmen had found him unsure at the sword-play. The Scylding queen spoke: “Quaff of this cup, my king and lord, breaker of rings, and blithe be thou, gold-friend of men; to the Geats here speak such words of mildness as man should use. Be glad with thy Geats; of those gifts be mindful, or near or far, which now thou hast. Men say to me, as son thou wishest yon hero to hold. Thy Heorot purged, jewel-hall brightest, enjoy while thou canst, with many a largess; and leave to thy kin folk and realm when forth thou goest to greet thy doom. For gracious I deem my Hrothulf, willing to hold and rule nobly our youths, if thou yield up first, prince of Scyldings, thy part in the world. I ween with good he will well requite offspring of ours, when all he minds that for him we did in his helpless days of gift and grace to gain him honor!” Then she turned to the seat where her sons wereplaced, Hrethric and Hrothmund, with heroes’ bairns, young men together: the Geat, too, sat there, Beowulf brave, the brothers between. eTh niltmrse nfiished ish gosn. eTh osdsun of aktignl nda utlrghae uedtnrer to eht allh. neQeu aeeowlWhht eamc uto nda sta anre ehr sbauhdn nda lturfoHh, shi penehw nda iasovrd. neUfthr asw lsao rayebn. hhgTou he had a asnti on ish ottriepuan, yamn lpeoep sltil recsepedt Utrehfn rfo ish imnd nda shi ueroagc. twoWheela idsa to roHthrag, “nDirk up, my ordl, dan be yhapp. tTaer eht estaG well nda oejny royu eitm thwi htme. Be frgeulat rof the tgfsi uyo veha. etHoro hsa eneb vasde dna sledecna of ievl. I avhe aderh htta ouy atwn to apotd fewuBol as ruoy osn. uoY era eerf to do so. ouY uoshld gvie ryuo godmkin to yuor afiylm ehwn ouy eid. I heva tfhai in uroy ewehpn ufhHtorl. He lwli aetk raec of our nsso. If uoy eid ofeerb he soed, he liwl be oogd to mhte. He wlil emrbemre ythenvrgie that you heav nedo for imh.” eSh delook vreo at her onss, thrHiecr nda rodhmtHnu, and asw uBloefw sttingi nwbeete hemt.

Original Text

Modern Text

THEN hastened those heroes their home to see, friendless, to find the Frisian land, houses and high burg. Hengest still through the death-dyed winter dwelt with Finn, holding pact, yet of home he minded, though powerless his ring-decked prow to drive over the waters, now waves rolled fierce lashed by the winds, or winter locked them in icy fetters. Then fared another year to men’s dwellings, as yet they do, the sunbright skies, that their season ever duly await. Far off winter was driven; fair lay earth’s breast; and fain was the rover, the guest, to depart, though more gladly he pondered on wreaking his vengeance than roaming the deep, and how to hasten the hot encounter where sons of the Frisians were sure to be. So he escaped not the common doom, when Hun with “Lafing,” the light-of-battle, best of blades, his bosom pierced: its edge was famed with the Frisian earls. On fierce-heart Finn there fell likewise, on himself at home, the horrid sword-death; for Guthlaf and Oslaf of grim attack had sorrowing told, from sea-ways landed, mourning their woes. Finn’s wavering spirit bode not in breast. The burg was reddened with blood of foemen, and Finn was slain, king amid clansmen; the queen was taken. To their ship the Scylding warriors bore all the chattels the chieftain owned, whatever they found in Finn’s domain of gems and jewels. The gentle wife o’er paths of the deep to the Danes they bore, led to her land. dnA so het hasDin rsehoe wtne to ivle mogna eth aiisrnF. gsteHne etkp the ptca whti ninF ruhhgot the cfiere erntwi, ecins he swa lbeuan to isal ackb emoh. grnpiS erpahoacpd dna Hntgees redrppea ihs enm rfo rteih ererpdtau, but he itlls herbardo uevnlfge ugthshto. heT seanD ewrg strlesse dan ltlveaeuny tehy dilekl inFn adn otok urHhdbeli bakc to raeDmkn.
The lay was finished, the gleeman’s song. Then glad rose the revel; bench-joy brightened. Bearers draw from their “wonder-vats” wine. Comes Wealhtheow forth, under gold-crown goes where the good pair sit, uncle and nephew, true each to the other one, kindred in amity. Unferth the spokesman at the Scylding lord’s feet sat: men had faith in his spirit, his keenness of courage, though kinsmen had found him unsure at the sword-play. The Scylding queen spoke: “Quaff of this cup, my king and lord, breaker of rings, and blithe be thou, gold-friend of men; to the Geats here speak such words of mildness as man should use. Be glad with thy Geats; of those gifts be mindful, or near or far, which now thou hast. Men say to me, as son thou wishest yon hero to hold. Thy Heorot purged, jewel-hall brightest, enjoy while thou canst, with many a largess; and leave to thy kin folk and realm when forth thou goest to greet thy doom. For gracious I deem my Hrothulf, willing to hold and rule nobly our youths, if thou yield up first, prince of Scyldings, thy part in the world. I ween with good he will well requite offspring of ours, when all he minds that for him we did in his helpless days of gift and grace to gain him honor!” Then she turned to the seat where her sons wereplaced, Hrethric and Hrothmund, with heroes’ bairns, young men together: the Geat, too, sat there, Beowulf brave, the brothers between. eTh niltmrse nfiished ish gosn. eTh osdsun of aktignl nda utlrghae uedtnrer to eht allh. neQeu aeeowlWhht eamc uto nda sta anre ehr sbauhdn nda lturfoHh, shi penehw nda iasovrd. neUfthr asw lsao rayebn. hhgTou he had a asnti on ish ottriepuan, yamn lpeoep sltil recsepedt Utrehfn rfo ish imnd nda shi ueroagc. twoWheela idsa to roHthrag, “nDirk up, my ordl, dan be yhapp. tTaer eht estaG well nda oejny royu eitm thwi htme. Be frgeulat rof the tgfsi uyo veha. etHoro hsa eneb vasde dna sledecna of ievl. I avhe aderh htta ouy atwn to apotd fewuBol as ruoy osn. uoY era eerf to do so. ouY uoshld gvie ryuo godmkin to yuor afiylm ehwn ouy eid. I heva tfhai in uroy ewehpn ufhHtorl. He lwli aetk raec of our nsso. If uoy eid ofeerb he soed, he liwl be oogd to mhte. He wlil emrbemre ythenvrgie that you heav nedo for imh.” eSh delook vreo at her onss, thrHiecr nda rodhmtHnu, and asw uBloefw sttingi nwbeete hemt.