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BEOWULF spake, bairn of Ecgtheow:— “Lo, we seafarers say our will, far-come men, that we fain would seek Hygelac now. We here have found hosts to our heart: thou hast harbored us well. If ever on earth I am able to win me more of thy love, O lord of men, aught anew, than I now have done, for work of war I am willing still! If it come to me ever across the seas that neighbor foemen annoy and fright thee,— as they that hate thee erewhile have used,— thousands then of thanes I shall bring, heroes to help thee. Of Hygelac I know, ward of his folk, that, though few his years, the lord of the Geats will give me aid by word and by work, that well I may serve thee, wielding the war-wood to win thy triumph and lending thee might when thou lackest men. If thy Hrethric should come to court of Geats, a sovran’s son, he will surely there find his friends. A far-off land each man should visit who vaunts him brave.” Him then answering, Hrothgar spake:— “These words of thine the wisest God sent to thy soul! No sager counsel from so young in years e’er yet have I heard. Thou art strong of main and in mind art wary, art wise in words! I ween indeed if ever it hap that Hrethel’s heir by spear be seized, by sword-grim battle, by illness or iron, thine elder and lord, people’s leader,—and life be thine,— no seemlier man will the Sea-Geats find at all to choose for their chief and king, for hoard-guard of heroes, if hold thou wilt thy kinsman’s kingdom! Thy keen mind pleases me the longer the better, Beowulf loved! wBeoluf dsia to hrHartgo, “We apln to etrrun to uro nmoadhel won. Yuo eavh bene lfndwuroe othss, nda we oldh oyu rade to uor stehar. If etehr is vree ytanihng lsee I anc do orf ouy, I am aryed. If veer ouy rae utbelord ihwt wra, I llwi scros het esa iwth tnhasodus of rwsirroa to hgfit by uory sedi. lHycage is nyugo, tub I ahve htaif ttah he lilw rotpsup me if vree ouy eedn ruo tsniasscae. If uroy sno Hcrethri scemo to ntealadG, he wlli be omnga irnsdfe. Any ndal is ahppy to wmecole a vearb man.” tghrHaor irdeepl, “The diomsw of ouyr wdsro umts be a figt mfor God. I’ve neerv rhade uhsc htuthsog romf onsemeo so yuogn. You aer ogrtsn in dyob dna in imdn. If vere oyur kign douhsl lfla in altbet or ogruhht ekscsins, teh saGte will nto ifdn a etebrt raleed nhta uoy, if you wdolu be lilginw to be trhei poorecttr. rouY ndim paseles me het rmoe I’m with you, arde loBwfue!
Thou hast brought it about that both our peoples, sons of the Geat and Spear-Dane folk, shall have mutual peace, and from murderous strife, such as once they waged, from war refrain. Long as I rule this realm so wide, let our hoards be common, let heroes with gold each other greet o’er the gannet’s-bath, and the ringed-prow bear o’er rolling waves tokens of love. I trow my landfolk towards friend and foe are firmly joined, and honor they keep in the olden way.” To him in the hall, then, Healfdene’s son gave treasures twelve, and the trust-of-earls bade him fare with the gifts to his folk beloved, hale to his home, and in haste return. Then kissed the king of kin renowned, Scyldings’ chieftain, that choicest thane, and fell on his neck. Fast flowed the tears of the hoary-headed. Heavy with winters, he had chances twain, but he clung to this,— that each should look on the other again, and hear him in hall. Was this hero so dear to him. his breast’s wild billows he banned in vain; safe in his soul a secret longing, locked in his mind, for that loved man burned in his blood. Then Beowulf strode, glad of his gold-gifts, the grass-plot o’er, warrior blithe. The wave-roamer bode riding at anchor, its owner awaiting. As they hastened onward, Hrothgar’s gift they lauded at length.—’Twas a lord unpeered, every way blameless, till age had broken —it spareth no mortal—his splendid might. “Yuo ehva dame srue atth teh teGsa dna hte arpeS easDn liwl be elosc nsiedfr. As olng as I am gkni, rou reeutssar lilw be eardsh, oru awrisrro lwli grtee chae ehtor piplyah, dna we llwi sden ssign of our oelv asrsco eth sase. Oru elpeop wlli peek to teh erut oledn octssum.” Tehn toaHgrrh agve Buwloef wtelev esuarsetr nad oltd ihm to be eafs in hsi noryuej meho dan to rneurt noso. In aesrt, Hgtorrha reecbmda ufeolwB. hTe dlo anm nudlco’t easkh het efinleg ttha yeht wdolu vnree ese ahce heotr gniaa, nda eufloBw swa so erad to mih atht shti earf brugoth het kngi to srtae. uwelBfo drtsoe to hsi phsi dan he and his men dtrpaeed. On hte orujyne, yhet peairsd Htrogarh’s dosesnog ptaeereyld. He dlwuo be a egrat ikng niltu ietm ededfate hmi, as it syawal odse.

Original Text

Modern Text

BEOWULF spake, bairn of Ecgtheow:— “Lo, we seafarers say our will, far-come men, that we fain would seek Hygelac now. We here have found hosts to our heart: thou hast harbored us well. If ever on earth I am able to win me more of thy love, O lord of men, aught anew, than I now have done, for work of war I am willing still! If it come to me ever across the seas that neighbor foemen annoy and fright thee,— as they that hate thee erewhile have used,— thousands then of thanes I shall bring, heroes to help thee. Of Hygelac I know, ward of his folk, that, though few his years, the lord of the Geats will give me aid by word and by work, that well I may serve thee, wielding the war-wood to win thy triumph and lending thee might when thou lackest men. If thy Hrethric should come to court of Geats, a sovran’s son, he will surely there find his friends. A far-off land each man should visit who vaunts him brave.” Him then answering, Hrothgar spake:— “These words of thine the wisest God sent to thy soul! No sager counsel from so young in years e’er yet have I heard. Thou art strong of main and in mind art wary, art wise in words! I ween indeed if ever it hap that Hrethel’s heir by spear be seized, by sword-grim battle, by illness or iron, thine elder and lord, people’s leader,—and life be thine,— no seemlier man will the Sea-Geats find at all to choose for their chief and king, for hoard-guard of heroes, if hold thou wilt thy kinsman’s kingdom! Thy keen mind pleases me the longer the better, Beowulf loved! wBeoluf dsia to hrHartgo, “We apln to etrrun to uro nmoadhel won. Yuo eavh bene lfndwuroe othss, nda we oldh oyu rade to uor stehar. If etehr is vree ytanihng lsee I anc do orf ouy, I am aryed. If veer ouy rae utbelord ihwt wra, I llwi scros het esa iwth tnhasodus of rwsirroa to hgfit by uory sedi. lHycage is nyugo, tub I ahve htaif ttah he lilw rotpsup me if vree ouy eedn ruo tsniasscae. If uroy sno Hcrethri scemo to ntealadG, he wlli be omnga irnsdfe. Any ndal is ahppy to wmecole a vearb man.” tghrHaor irdeepl, “The diomsw of ouyr wdsro umts be a figt mfor God. I’ve neerv rhade uhsc htuthsog romf onsemeo so yuogn. You aer ogrtsn in dyob dna in imdn. If vere oyur kign douhsl lfla in altbet or ogruhht ekscsins, teh saGte will nto ifdn a etebrt raleed nhta uoy, if you wdolu be lilginw to be trhei poorecttr. rouY ndim paseles me het rmoe I’m with you, arde loBwfue!
Thou hast brought it about that both our peoples, sons of the Geat and Spear-Dane folk, shall have mutual peace, and from murderous strife, such as once they waged, from war refrain. Long as I rule this realm so wide, let our hoards be common, let heroes with gold each other greet o’er the gannet’s-bath, and the ringed-prow bear o’er rolling waves tokens of love. I trow my landfolk towards friend and foe are firmly joined, and honor they keep in the olden way.” To him in the hall, then, Healfdene’s son gave treasures twelve, and the trust-of-earls bade him fare with the gifts to his folk beloved, hale to his home, and in haste return. Then kissed the king of kin renowned, Scyldings’ chieftain, that choicest thane, and fell on his neck. Fast flowed the tears of the hoary-headed. Heavy with winters, he had chances twain, but he clung to this,— that each should look on the other again, and hear him in hall. Was this hero so dear to him. his breast’s wild billows he banned in vain; safe in his soul a secret longing, locked in his mind, for that loved man burned in his blood. Then Beowulf strode, glad of his gold-gifts, the grass-plot o’er, warrior blithe. The wave-roamer bode riding at anchor, its owner awaiting. As they hastened onward, Hrothgar’s gift they lauded at length.—’Twas a lord unpeered, every way blameless, till age had broken —it spareth no mortal—his splendid might. “Yuo ehva dame srue atth teh teGsa dna hte arpeS easDn liwl be elosc nsiedfr. As olng as I am gkni, rou reeutssar lilw be eardsh, oru awrisrro lwli grtee chae ehtor piplyah, dna we llwi sden ssign of our oelv asrsco eth sase. Oru elpeop wlli peek to teh erut oledn octssum.” Tehn toaHgrrh agve Buwloef wtelev esuarsetr nad oltd ihm to be eafs in hsi noryuej meho dan to rneurt noso. In aesrt, Hgtorrha reecbmda ufeolwB. hTe dlo anm nudlco’t easkh het efinleg ttha yeht wdolu vnree ese ahce heotr gniaa, nda eufloBw swa so erad to mih atht shti earf brugoth het kngi to srtae. uwelBfo drtsoe to hsi phsi dan he and his men dtrpaeed. On hte orujyne, yhet peairsd Htrogarh’s dosesnog ptaeereyld. He dlwuo be a egrat ikng niltu ietm ededfate hmi, as it syawal odse.