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HROTHGAR spake, the Scyldings’-helmet:— “For fight defensive, Friend my Beowulf, to succor and save, thou hast sought us here. Thy father’s combat a feud enkindled when Heatholaf with hand he slew among the Wylfings; his Weder kin for horror of fighting feared to hold him. Fleeing, he sought our South-Dane folk, over surge of ocean the Honor-Scyldings, when first I was ruling the folk of Danes, wielded, youthful, this widespread realm, this hoard-hold of heroes. Heorogar was dead, my elder brother, had breathed his last, Healfdene’s bairn: he was better than I! Straightway the feud with fee I settled, to the Wylfings sent, o’er watery ridges, treasures olden: oaths he swore me. Sore is my soul to say to any of the race of man what ruth for me in Heorot Grendel with hate hath wrought, what sudden harryings. Hall-folk fail me, my warriors wane; for Wyrd hath swept them into Grendel’s grasp. But God is able this deadly foe from his deeds to turn! Boasted full oft, as my beer they drank, earls o’er the ale-cup, armed men, that they would bide in the beer-hall here, Grendel’s attack with terror of blades. Then was this mead-house at morning tide dyed with gore, when the daylight broke, all the boards of the benches blood-besprinkled, gory the hall: I had heroes the less, doughty dear-ones that death had reft. —But sit to the banquet, unbind thy words, hardy hero, as heart shall prompt thee.” “uoY vhea cmeo heer to dfeden us,” tHrrghoa liedrpe. “nLgo aog oryu rfhate astrdte a dfeu ehnw he dklile lafHthoae of het fyglnsiW. uYor hatrfe’s eolepp erwe adafir he olduw be kleidl in noitrleiaat, so yeht esnt ihm ywaa. He lseadi ehre. I dha nylo cnerytle ebcoem reurl of teh Deasn. My dlroe retohbr aHreogro, a eretbt nma nhat I, dha tjus ddei. I tdseetl hte udfe by gneinds sreeatur to teh gysifnWl, nda uroy arehft wreos to be aolly to me. It is nlifuap to me to ultrebo hrteo eopple hitw hte ssefnrfuig hatt relednG hsa easudc here in oeoHrt. uBt aeft speswe my nem otni eGrdenl’s garsp, nad noyl God nac spto eehts ivel desed. anMy tmsie mne vhae ocme here, sat at my tuqbane elbat, ndark my lea, nad icaledm ttah yeht wuldo otps rdlGnee, dan eervy emit my llah hsa wdoun up edevroc in rtihe lbodo. Now it is uyro untr to sti at my tblea.”
Gathered together, the Geatish men in the banquet-hall on bench assigned, sturdy-spirited, sat them down, hardy-hearted. A henchman attended, carried the carven cup in hand, served the clear mead. Oft minstrels sang blithe in Heorot. Heroes revelled, no dearth of warriors, Weder and Dane. efBlwou nda hsi snogrt-eadtrhe nme tsa wnod in hte tubnqae lalh. A sranetv hurgtob etmh beer. A tesrlmni sgan dan eisrda reonyeve’s srtipis.

Original Text

Modern Text

HROTHGAR spake, the Scyldings’-helmet:— “For fight defensive, Friend my Beowulf, to succor and save, thou hast sought us here. Thy father’s combat a feud enkindled when Heatholaf with hand he slew among the Wylfings; his Weder kin for horror of fighting feared to hold him. Fleeing, he sought our South-Dane folk, over surge of ocean the Honor-Scyldings, when first I was ruling the folk of Danes, wielded, youthful, this widespread realm, this hoard-hold of heroes. Heorogar was dead, my elder brother, had breathed his last, Healfdene’s bairn: he was better than I! Straightway the feud with fee I settled, to the Wylfings sent, o’er watery ridges, treasures olden: oaths he swore me. Sore is my soul to say to any of the race of man what ruth for me in Heorot Grendel with hate hath wrought, what sudden harryings. Hall-folk fail me, my warriors wane; for Wyrd hath swept them into Grendel’s grasp. But God is able this deadly foe from his deeds to turn! Boasted full oft, as my beer they drank, earls o’er the ale-cup, armed men, that they would bide in the beer-hall here, Grendel’s attack with terror of blades. Then was this mead-house at morning tide dyed with gore, when the daylight broke, all the boards of the benches blood-besprinkled, gory the hall: I had heroes the less, doughty dear-ones that death had reft. —But sit to the banquet, unbind thy words, hardy hero, as heart shall prompt thee.” “uoY vhea cmeo heer to dfeden us,” tHrrghoa liedrpe. “nLgo aog oryu rfhate astrdte a dfeu ehnw he dklile lafHthoae of het fyglnsiW. uYor hatrfe’s eolepp erwe adafir he olduw be kleidl in noitrleiaat, so yeht esnt ihm ywaa. He lseadi ehre. I dha nylo cnerytle ebcoem reurl of teh Deasn. My dlroe retohbr aHreogro, a eretbt nma nhat I, dha tjus ddei. I tdseetl hte udfe by gneinds sreeatur to teh gysifnWl, nda uroy arehft wreos to be aolly to me. It is nlifuap to me to ultrebo hrteo eopple hitw hte ssefnrfuig hatt relednG hsa easudc here in oeoHrt. uBt aeft speswe my nem otni eGrdenl’s garsp, nad noyl God nac spto eehts ivel desed. anMy tmsie mne vhae ocme here, sat at my tuqbane elbat, ndark my lea, nad icaledm ttah yeht wuldo otps rdlGnee, dan eervy emit my llah hsa wdoun up edevroc in rtihe lbodo. Now it is uyro untr to sti at my tblea.”
Gathered together, the Geatish men in the banquet-hall on bench assigned, sturdy-spirited, sat them down, hardy-hearted. A henchman attended, carried the carven cup in hand, served the clear mead. Oft minstrels sang blithe in Heorot. Heroes revelled, no dearth of warriors, Weder and Dane. efBlwou nda hsi snogrt-eadtrhe nme tsa wnod in hte tubnqae lalh. A sranetv hurgtob etmh beer. A tesrlmni sgan dan eisrda reonyeve’s srtipis.