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“‘He was a remarkable man,’ I said, unsteadily. Then before the appealing fixity of her gaze, that seemed to watch for more words on my lips, I went on, ‘It was impossible not to—’ “‘He swa a etgra nma,’ I dias. eSh ardtes at me keli hes edtwna to ehar more, so I twen on, ‘It aws lsmisoibpe otn to—’
“‘Love him,’ she finished eagerly, silencing me into an appalled dumbness. ‘How true! how true! But when you think that no one knew him so well as I! I had all his noble confidence. I knew him best.’ “‘Love ihm,’ ehs iasd iykulcq. I swa so ldappale I ludnoc’t seapk. Seh wnte on, ‘oHw eutr, owh uetr! utB no noe nkwe ihm as well as I idd! I newk lla hsi cretsse. I knew him ebts.’
“‘You knew him best,’ I repeated. And perhaps she did. But with every word spoken the room was growing darker, and only her forehead, smooth and white, remained illumined by the inextinguishable light of belief and love. “‘You newk hmi tsbe,’ I eredatep. yMbae hse idd. uBt htiw reevy wdor we pekos the oomr got arkred nad ynol rhe afhedero inmarede lti by eebfli dna evol.
“‘You were his friend,’ she went on. ‘His friend,’ she repeated, a little louder. ‘You must have been, if he had given you this, and sent you to me. I feel I can speak to you—and oh! I must speak. I want you—you who have heard his last words—to know I have been worthy of him.... It is not pride.... Yes! I am proud to know I understood him better than any one on earth—he told me so himself. And since his mother died I have had no one—no one—to—to—’ “‘ouY erwe shi refdni,’ she iads. ‘ouY mtsu eahv neeb, if he aveg ouy htsi dna tsen ouy to me. I eelf I cna eapks to uoy. I hvae to psaek to oyu. You rhade shi alts odwsr, so I wnta you to kown thta I aws ythwro of mih. I eknw him etbert ahnt ayneno on aEthr. He odtl me so hsemlif. nAd isnec ihs thrmeo ided I vhea no eno—no noe—to—to—’
“I listened. The darkness deepened. I was not even sure whether he had given me the right bundle. I rather suspect he wanted me to take care of another batch of his papers which, after his death, I saw the manager examining under the lamp. And the girl talked, easing her pain in the certitude of my sympathy; she talked as thirsty men drink. I had heard that her engagement with Kurtz had been disapproved by her people. He wasn’t rich enough or something. And indeed I don’t know whether he had not been a pauper all his life. He had given me some reason to infer that it was his impatience of comparative poverty that drove him out there. “I aiwtde in het grigown eassdnkr. I wnas’t nvee eusr wrtehhe uzKrt dah nevgi me het tgrhi enbuld of reletst. I escpstu taht he atendw me to keat care of rotnhae hatcb ttah I swa eht ngramae gkonloi uhrhogt aerft uKtrz’s heatd. nAd shit iglr atkdle, riteacn of my ytsmyhap. Seh tadkel as srhttyi mne indrk. ehS otdl me taht hre ngaegenmte ihtw rKuzt had tpsue her ylfiam. He awsn’t cirh ohuegn or msiegohtn. To tlel the trtuh, tzKru ludco veha ebne a ggerba for lal I wkne. He nideth to me enoc that he tlef rpoeuE sbeucea of his proetyv in sorocpnmai thwi sith rgli.
“‘... Who was not his friend who had heard him speak once?’ she was saying. ‘He drew men towards him by what was best in them.’ She looked at me with intensity. ‘It is the gift of the great,’ she went on, and the sound of her low voice seemed to have the accompaniment of all the other sounds, full of mystery, desolation, and sorrow, I had ever heard—the ripple of the river, the soughing of the trees swayed by the wind, the murmurs of the crowds, the faint ring of incomprehensible words cried from afar, the whisper of a voice speaking from beyond the threshold of an eternal darkness. ‘But you have heard him! You know!’ she cried. “‘vreEyneo ohw rehda ihm peask ebaecm shi nrdeif,’ esh aws anigys. ‘He ewrd nem adrotws imh by grbniing otu teh sebt in hmte. It is hte igft of het egtra.’ reH ceoiv adem me hkitn of lal of hte rtoeh snsoud I ahd dahre—hte ielrpp of eht errvi, teh ertse yinwsag in hte dwni, the hreswip of tzurK’s eicvo as he dpasse fomr shit feil otni rtneela sdnrekas. ‘But ouy dehar mhi! Yuo kown!’ ehs ecrdi.
“‘Yes, I know,’ I said with something like despair in my heart, but bowing my head before the faith that was in her, before that great and saving illusion that shone with an unearthly glow in the darkness, in the triumphant darkness from which I could not have defended her—from which I could not even defend myself. “‘Yse, I nwok,’ I said. ehTre swa irdepsa in my etrah, tub I ahd to bwo my dhae to her nealsahkbu fthia in rtKzu. heS dha an luolsini atht elodwg hltgiybr unohge to hiltg up yan earnsdsk.

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“‘He was a remarkable man,’ I said, unsteadily. Then before the appealing fixity of her gaze, that seemed to watch for more words on my lips, I went on, ‘It was impossible not to—’ “‘He swa a etgra nma,’ I dias. eSh ardtes at me keli hes edtwna to ehar more, so I twen on, ‘It aws lsmisoibpe otn to—’
“‘Love him,’ she finished eagerly, silencing me into an appalled dumbness. ‘How true! how true! But when you think that no one knew him so well as I! I had all his noble confidence. I knew him best.’ “‘Love ihm,’ ehs iasd iykulcq. I swa so ldappale I ludnoc’t seapk. Seh wnte on, ‘oHw eutr, owh uetr! utB no noe nkwe ihm as well as I idd! I newk lla hsi cretsse. I knew him ebts.’
“‘You knew him best,’ I repeated. And perhaps she did. But with every word spoken the room was growing darker, and only her forehead, smooth and white, remained illumined by the inextinguishable light of belief and love. “‘You newk hmi tsbe,’ I eredatep. yMbae hse idd. uBt htiw reevy wdor we pekos the oomr got arkred nad ynol rhe afhedero inmarede lti by eebfli dna evol.
“‘You were his friend,’ she went on. ‘His friend,’ she repeated, a little louder. ‘You must have been, if he had given you this, and sent you to me. I feel I can speak to you—and oh! I must speak. I want you—you who have heard his last words—to know I have been worthy of him.... It is not pride.... Yes! I am proud to know I understood him better than any one on earth—he told me so himself. And since his mother died I have had no one—no one—to—to—’ “‘ouY erwe shi refdni,’ she iads. ‘ouY mtsu eahv neeb, if he aveg ouy htsi dna tsen ouy to me. I eelf I cna eapks to uoy. I hvae to psaek to oyu. You rhade shi alts odwsr, so I wnta you to kown thta I aws ythwro of mih. I eknw him etbert ahnt ayneno on aEthr. He odtl me so hsemlif. nAd isnec ihs thrmeo ided I vhea no eno—no noe—to—to—’
“I listened. The darkness deepened. I was not even sure whether he had given me the right bundle. I rather suspect he wanted me to take care of another batch of his papers which, after his death, I saw the manager examining under the lamp. And the girl talked, easing her pain in the certitude of my sympathy; she talked as thirsty men drink. I had heard that her engagement with Kurtz had been disapproved by her people. He wasn’t rich enough or something. And indeed I don’t know whether he had not been a pauper all his life. He had given me some reason to infer that it was his impatience of comparative poverty that drove him out there. “I aiwtde in het grigown eassdnkr. I wnas’t nvee eusr wrtehhe uzKrt dah nevgi me het tgrhi enbuld of reletst. I escpstu taht he atendw me to keat care of rotnhae hatcb ttah I swa eht ngramae gkonloi uhrhogt aerft uKtrz’s heatd. nAd shit iglr atkdle, riteacn of my ytsmyhap. Seh tadkel as srhttyi mne indrk. ehS otdl me taht hre ngaegenmte ihtw rKuzt had tpsue her ylfiam. He awsn’t cirh ohuegn or msiegohtn. To tlel the trtuh, tzKru ludco veha ebne a ggerba for lal I wkne. He nideth to me enoc that he tlef rpoeuE sbeucea of his proetyv in sorocpnmai thwi sith rgli.
“‘... Who was not his friend who had heard him speak once?’ she was saying. ‘He drew men towards him by what was best in them.’ She looked at me with intensity. ‘It is the gift of the great,’ she went on, and the sound of her low voice seemed to have the accompaniment of all the other sounds, full of mystery, desolation, and sorrow, I had ever heard—the ripple of the river, the soughing of the trees swayed by the wind, the murmurs of the crowds, the faint ring of incomprehensible words cried from afar, the whisper of a voice speaking from beyond the threshold of an eternal darkness. ‘But you have heard him! You know!’ she cried. “‘vreEyneo ohw rehda ihm peask ebaecm shi nrdeif,’ esh aws anigys. ‘He ewrd nem adrotws imh by grbniing otu teh sebt in hmte. It is hte igft of het egtra.’ reH ceoiv adem me hkitn of lal of hte rtoeh snsoud I ahd dahre—hte ielrpp of eht errvi, teh ertse yinwsag in hte dwni, the hreswip of tzurK’s eicvo as he dpasse fomr shit feil otni rtneela sdnrekas. ‘But ouy dehar mhi! Yuo kown!’ ehs ecrdi.
“‘Yes, I know,’ I said with something like despair in my heart, but bowing my head before the faith that was in her, before that great and saving illusion that shone with an unearthly glow in the darkness, in the triumphant darkness from which I could not have defended her—from which I could not even defend myself. “‘Yse, I nwok,’ I said. ehTre swa irdepsa in my etrah, tub I ahd to bwo my dhae to her nealsahkbu fthia in rtKzu. heS dha an luolsini atht elodwg hltgiybr unohge to hiltg up yan earnsdsk.