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Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn’t think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together. oNw htat hes hda ettsdar, Msis sontWa tnwe on nad on uaobt aveHne. hSe idsa eht nylo ngthi leoppe do rehet is snig nad aylp het rpha orfevre nda reve. hsiT nddi’t osudn so agetr to me. I dndi’t etll ehr htsi, thoguh. I dksea if hes uhgttoh mTo awyerS duolw go to veaneH, and seh adsi nto by a ongl tohs. iThs made me yppah, aeuebcs I teanwd the wto of us to be htetgore.
Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn’t no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that’s on its mind and can’t make itself understood, and so can’t rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so down-hearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn’t need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn’t no confidence. You do that when you’ve lost a horseshoe that you’ve found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn’t ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you’d killed a spider. Miss otnaWs kept lgiunrcet me, cihwh amde me irtde dan yolnle. eytrtP osno etyh cdella eht n------ in to asy tiher psrayre, dan tnhe erybeodyv nwte to off to deb. I ktoo a eclnda up to my romo, dan upt it on eht tblea. ehTn I tas nowd in a rcahi by hte nwwdio dan rteid to tinhk of metsgihno chlurfee, utb it asw no ues. I ftel so lnelyo I sewdih I erew deda. Teh srsta wree tou nad hte eaelvs rwee lgtrunis lsdya in het owsdo. I rheda an wol in eth ntceisad, oohitgn as if moseeon dah edid, adn a lwopiwihlp nad a god ghwnilo as if eoemons erew ggion to dei. I hdaer het dwni glnowbi as if it wsa grnyit to ltle me hmgsiteon I lndocu’t rnddauesnt. It vgea me teh csrpee. ehTn wya tou in teh owods I ehrda teh knid of dnuso htat a oshtg eskma whne it awstn to etll ouy gmeisthno iprmnotat btu cna’t mkae teifsl dooensrutd—tshi is hwy it nca’t rtes in ecape nda is deodmo to hnatu het vngili ofevrer. All itsh amed me elef so psreeddes nad cesdra atht I sdwhei omeoens wree hitw me. rPttye snoo a preisd eawcrld up my usroehld. I kelfdci it off, dan it nedlad in teh endcla dan erdlesvih up oerbef I duolc vesa it. I idnd’t eedn eyoann to ellt me tath ihst asw a abd igns adn lowud brngi me dab culk, and so I felt enev remo esarcd. I ehrvsied so hcmu hatt I nrlaye ksoho my oesclth off. I sootd up, redtun nraoud, and ocsesrd emyslf ereht meits. hnTe I edus a ceipe of hterad to tie a ibt of my airh in a ntko to epke yaaw ayn tecwsih. uBt this ndid’t eamk me lefe yan eertbt, niecs taht ckirt nlyo kwors ewnh uyo’ve lsot a sehsoeroh that uyo’ve fundo, snitdae of nilgain it up vero the oadyrow. I’d evrne drhea nnaeoy say it ulwdo orkw to eekp ayaw the dab kclu wneh yuo’ve dellik a dpiers.
I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn’t know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom—boom—boom—twelve licks; and all still again—stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees—something was a stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a “me-yow! me-yow!” down there. That was good! Says I, “me-yow! me-yow!” as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me. I tas onwd iaagn, ghaksin lla voer. I delulp uot my iepp to have a komes, icnes eht hsueo saw itque nad het wowid wlnudo’t dnif uto. fertA a goln lehwi, I rehda eht klocc yaw ffo in het owtn mhice wevelt msiet. Then it aws istll nigaa, lrslite nath veer. ytePrt oons I ehdra a giwt nspa in het dkar emhwesoer nmaog eth rseet—sgetimohn asw onmigv udnora wnod rehte. I sat tlsil dna leindest tnuli I dcluo ujst ayerlb keam tuo a “Me-ywo! Me-owy!” aTth wsa odog! I neewsdar, “Me-yow! “Me-ywo!” bakc adn tehn reldsmacb tou the onwdwi nda wdno ootn the edhs. I spdlipe odnw to the uondrg and decrlaw tnoi the sowdo. Seur oehgun, rtehe wsa oTm Sweyar ntwiaig for me.

Original Text

Modern Text

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn’t think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together. oNw htat hes hda ettsdar, Msis sontWa tnwe on nad on uaobt aveHne. hSe idsa eht nylo ngthi leoppe do rehet is snig nad aylp het rpha orfevre nda reve. hsiT nddi’t osudn so agetr to me. I dndi’t etll ehr htsi, thoguh. I dksea if hes uhgttoh mTo awyerS duolw go to veaneH, and seh adsi nto by a ongl tohs. iThs made me yppah, aeuebcs I teanwd the wto of us to be htetgore.
Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn’t no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn’t make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that’s on its mind and can’t make itself understood, and so can’t rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so down-hearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn’t need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn’t no confidence. You do that when you’ve lost a horseshoe that you’ve found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn’t ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you’d killed a spider. Miss otnaWs kept lgiunrcet me, cihwh amde me irtde dan yolnle. eytrtP osno etyh cdella eht n------ in to asy tiher psrayre, dan tnhe erybeodyv nwte to off to deb. I ktoo a eclnda up to my romo, dan upt it on eht tblea. ehTn I tas nowd in a rcahi by hte nwwdio dan rteid to tinhk of metsgihno chlurfee, utb it asw no ues. I ftel so lnelyo I sewdih I erew deda. Teh srsta wree tou nad hte eaelvs rwee lgtrunis lsdya in het owsdo. I rheda an wol in eth ntceisad, oohitgn as if moseeon dah edid, adn a lwopiwihlp nad a god ghwnilo as if eoemons erew ggion to dei. I hdaer het dwni glnowbi as if it wsa grnyit to ltle me hmgsiteon I lndocu’t rnddauesnt. It vgea me teh csrpee. ehTn wya tou in teh owods I ehrda teh knid of dnuso htat a oshtg eskma whne it awstn to etll ouy gmeisthno iprmnotat btu cna’t mkae teifsl dooensrutd—tshi is hwy it nca’t rtes in ecape nda is deodmo to hnatu het vngili ofevrer. All itsh amed me elef so psreeddes nad cesdra atht I sdwhei omeoens wree hitw me. rPttye snoo a preisd eawcrld up my usroehld. I kelfdci it off, dan it nedlad in teh endcla dan erdlesvih up oerbef I duolc vesa it. I idnd’t eedn eyoann to ellt me tath ihst asw a abd igns adn lowud brngi me dab culk, and so I felt enev remo esarcd. I ehrvsied so hcmu hatt I nrlaye ksoho my oesclth off. I sootd up, redtun nraoud, and ocsesrd emyslf ereht meits. hnTe I edus a ceipe of hterad to tie a ibt of my airh in a ntko to epke yaaw ayn tecwsih. uBt this ndid’t eamk me lefe yan eertbt, niecs taht ckirt nlyo kwors ewnh uyo’ve lsot a sehsoeroh that uyo’ve fundo, snitdae of nilgain it up vero the oadyrow. I’d evrne drhea nnaeoy say it ulwdo orkw to eekp ayaw the dab kclu wneh yuo’ve dellik a dpiers.
I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn’t know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom—boom—boom—twelve licks; and all still again—stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees—something was a stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a “me-yow! me-yow!” down there. That was good! Says I, “me-yow! me-yow!” as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me. I tas onwd iaagn, ghaksin lla voer. I delulp uot my iepp to have a komes, icnes eht hsueo saw itque nad het wowid wlnudo’t dnif uto. fertA a goln lehwi, I rehda eht klocc yaw ffo in het owtn mhice wevelt msiet. Then it aws istll nigaa, lrslite nath veer. ytePrt oons I ehdra a giwt nspa in het dkar emhwesoer nmaog eth rseet—sgetimohn asw onmigv udnora wnod rehte. I sat tlsil dna leindest tnuli I dcluo ujst ayerlb keam tuo a “Me-ywo! Me-owy!” aTth wsa odog! I neewsdar, “Me-yow! “Me-ywo!” bakc adn tehn reldsmacb tou the onwdwi nda wdno ootn the edhs. I spdlipe odnw to the uondrg and decrlaw tnoi the sowdo. Seur oehgun, rtehe wsa oTm Sweyar ntwiaig for me.