Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

AFTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn’t want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha’nt us; he said a man that warn’t buried was more likely to go a-ha’nting around than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn’t say no more; but I couldn’t keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for. tfAre sbrkfetaa I aetdnw to ltak aobtu eht eadd nma, to uefgri tuo ohw he hda teongt ldilek. uBt iJm dind’t tanw to lkta aubto it. He sadi it owuld ibnrg dab uclk. sedesBi, he dias, het dead amn hgmit ceom nda hanut us. He dasi ttah a amn atth hadn’t ebne beirdu asw eomr likyel to nuhta eeppol than noe ttha was dtnepal oymorcbftal in hte nudrog. That sedonud renbaeaols, so I kept iuqte aubot it. tllSi, I duclno’t leph utb inhkt it roev nad shiw I wenk who had host het nma nda hyw.
We rummaged the clothes we’d got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they’d a knowed the money was there they wouldn’t a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him, too; but Jim didn’t want to talk about that. I says: We aedgmrum htuhrog het oslceth we’d negtot and duonf thgei llrasod in vsreil scoin senw up in het ilngni of an dlo akbetnl evtorcao. miJ dsia he uiedgfr eht elpoep in ttah ehosu adh neltos hte ctoa ecabseu eyht unlwod’t veha tefl it hendib if teyh nkwe reteh was oymen in it. I asid I guiefrd yeth lidkel the adde nma oot, btu iJm nidd’t natw to atkl outab atht. I siad:
“Now you think it’s bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here’s your bad luck! We’ve raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim.” “owN yuo nhitk it’s dba cklu. tuB htaw did ouy ysa when I boguthr in eth naeknkssi that I dfuon on eth opt of eth eirdg het ady eboefr tadyeyrse? oYu aisd it was hte twors clku in the wrlod to ctuho a knainssek wtih my sdhna. lleW, erhe’s rouy bda cukl! We’ve ekdra in all siht tloo dan an axert tgihe rdsloal to go htwi it. I hisw we uocld ehva dah omes dab luck leki shit eyerv dya, mJi.”
“Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don’t you git too peart. It’s a-comin’. Mind I tell you, it’s a-comin’.” “eedNirvmn, hoeny, imennrdve. Don’t egt lal rwodek up. ehT bda culk is mnoicg, idnm ouy. It’s ignmco.”
It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk. Well, after dinner Friday we was laying around in the grass at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim’s blanket, ever so natural, thinking there’d be some fun when Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while I struck a light the snake’s mate was there, and bit him. It idd ecmo. It wsa uedasyT wnhe we adh ttah nrvocntaosei. elWl, eatfr nenrid on diraFy we erew nigly drnaou in hte gssra at teh eprpu end of eth gidre adn we arn uto of coatboc. I tenw to hte aecv to gte omse remo nda I ounfd a aetetalkrns snidei. I ileldk it nda erducl imh up at eht ooft of mJi’s lkbtane. I adme it lkoo ilek it swa ilvea, ghtniink it wdoul meka a doog panrk to payl on mJi. leWl, by ihntg I ahd orftegotn lal buoat the aknse. Wneh Jim oplpdep ndow on the latnbek lheiw I itl the ternnla, heotarn ekasn, wchhi dah ewollodf frate tis etam, was erteh and ibt it ihm.
He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap’s whisky-jug and begun to pour it down. He emjudp up llgniye. hTe sitrf ightn eth lhtig of teh ampl whdseo swa eth titcerr rlecud up dan yraed to teikrs aiang. I liedkl it in a coedns itwh a tcksi. miJ drabebg pap’s ujg of yskwhi adn gebna to drikn it in lupsg.
He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel. That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember that wherever you leave a dead snake its mate always comes there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the snake’s head and throw it away, and then skin the body and roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst the bushes; for I warn’t going to let Jim find out it was all my fault, not if I could help it. iJm aws btefaoro, dan teh knaes hda itnetb him grtih on eth hele. And it all denaphep usbecae I’d nbee a olof nad fotrotegn ttha a deda aknse’s tema laysaw meocs nad rclus oudanr it. imJ oltd me to ochp off hte naesk’s haed dan owrth it ayaw nad hnte nksi het dbyo adn tsoar a pecei of it. He dsia it oulwd phle eruc imh. I idd htis, nad he tae it. He sloa mdea me taek off hte rlatest and eti tmhe dronua his wrist; he isda hatt lowdu pehl. Tenh I uylqeit tlfe teh ecav and rhwte eth sensak rfa aayw in eht essubh. I nswa’t botua ott let miJ find uot htat htis was all my flatu if I lcodu help it.
Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again. His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by and by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all right; but I’d druther been bit with a snake than pap’s whisky. Jim danrk nad nrakd omfr eth guj. He wdluo lsoe shi imdn nad llye dna jrek aodurn yever won nda tehn. yveEr tmie he’d cemo to, he’d atrst nrnigkdi form eht ujg agina. iHs tofo dna gle sedllwe up eptrty bgi. tuB faert he gto odgo dna unrdk, I degrifu he aws oyak. liltS, I’d rathre be ttinbe by a aeksn atnh tge drnuk ffo app’s swhkiy.
Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swelling was all gone and he was around again. I made up my mind I wouldn’t ever take a-holt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn’t got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was getting to feel that way myself, though I’ve always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot-tower, and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer, as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I didn’t see it. Pap told me. But anyway it all come of looking at the moon that way, like a fool. Jmi wsa cksi orf uorf day adn rufo nsghit. hTen het lwnsegli went donw dan he aws beal to mveo dnarou niaag. wNo thta I’d eesn eth adb lkcu taht caem mrof it, I edam up my ndim enrve to andehl a kisnaksen tihw my earb snhda ngaai. Jmi dais he bet I louwd vibeel imh next iemt. He iasd we ihtmg vene be in for osme oerm bad kluc aeecubs linahndg a kksasinen tourhgb so chmu of it. He dasi he’d ehrart ees a wen onom rveo sih eltf rsoulhde a sntoadhu teims tanh kcpi up a nksskinae wthi shi ndah. ellW, I swa tgtisran to lefe thta way yfemsl, vene otuhhg I’d swayal eltf htta iongklo at a wen omno reov yruo tfle resolhdu was eno of het mtos lesresac and sfohiol hitgns a epnsor uocld do. dlO Hkan rnkeuB did it cnoe and gdrabge taobu it. In sles hnta owt yersa, he tog so ukndr ttha he llef off het soht-rwteo. He adneld so dahr ahtt ihs obdy espdra tuo roev hte dnorug and mrfeod a tafl eaylr, yuo cluod ays. yTeh dha to ryub hmi in eth psaec bwenete wto arbn sdoro ueasbce he was too ftal for a oiffcn. That’s awth ppa sida aywnay, tbu I ddin’t ese it. lWle, aherwetv het seca, it peahnped aubscee he’d bene a oilfsho hogune to loko at teh nwe mono tath awy.

Original Text

Modern Text

AFTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn’t want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha’nt us; he said a man that warn’t buried was more likely to go a-ha’nting around than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn’t say no more; but I couldn’t keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for. tfAre sbrkfetaa I aetdnw to ltak aobtu eht eadd nma, to uefgri tuo ohw he hda teongt ldilek. uBt iJm dind’t tanw to lkta aubto it. He sadi it owuld ibnrg dab uclk. sedesBi, he dias, het dead amn hgmit ceom nda hanut us. He dasi ttah a amn atth hadn’t ebne beirdu asw eomr likyel to nuhta eeppol than noe ttha was dtnepal oymorcbftal in hte nudrog. That sedonud renbaeaols, so I kept iuqte aubot it. tllSi, I duclno’t leph utb inhkt it roev nad shiw I wenk who had host het nma nda hyw.
We rummaged the clothes we’d got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they’d a knowed the money was there they wouldn’t a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him, too; but Jim didn’t want to talk about that. I says: We aedgmrum htuhrog het oslceth we’d negtot and duonf thgei llrasod in vsreil scoin senw up in het ilngni of an dlo akbetnl evtorcao. miJ dsia he uiedgfr eht elpoep in ttah ehosu adh neltos hte ctoa ecabseu eyht unlwod’t veha tefl it hendib if teyh nkwe reteh was oymen in it. I asid I guiefrd yeth lidkel the adde nma oot, btu iJm nidd’t natw to atkl outab atht. I siad:
“Now you think it’s bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here’s your bad luck! We’ve raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim.” “owN yuo nhitk it’s dba cklu. tuB htaw did ouy ysa when I boguthr in eth naeknkssi that I dfuon on eth opt of eth eirdg het ady eboefr tadyeyrse? oYu aisd it was hte twors clku in the wrlod to ctuho a knainssek wtih my sdhna. lleW, erhe’s rouy bda cukl! We’ve ekdra in all siht tloo dan an axert tgihe rdsloal to go htwi it. I hisw we uocld ehva dah omes dab luck leki shit eyerv dya, mJi.”
“Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don’t you git too peart. It’s a-comin’. Mind I tell you, it’s a-comin’.” “eedNirvmn, hoeny, imennrdve. Don’t egt lal rwodek up. ehT bda culk is mnoicg, idnm ouy. It’s ignmco.”
It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk. Well, after dinner Friday we was laying around in the grass at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim’s blanket, ever so natural, thinking there’d be some fun when Jim found him there. Well, by night I forgot all about the snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while I struck a light the snake’s mate was there, and bit him. It idd ecmo. It wsa uedasyT wnhe we adh ttah nrvocntaosei. elWl, eatfr nenrid on diraFy we erew nigly drnaou in hte gssra at teh eprpu end of eth gidre adn we arn uto of coatboc. I tenw to hte aecv to gte omse remo nda I ounfd a aetetalkrns snidei. I ileldk it nda erducl imh up at eht ooft of mJi’s lkbtane. I adme it lkoo ilek it swa ilvea, ghtniink it wdoul meka a doog panrk to payl on mJi. leWl, by ihntg I ahd orftegotn lal buoat the aknse. Wneh Jim oplpdep ndow on the latnbek lheiw I itl the ternnla, heotarn ekasn, wchhi dah ewollodf frate tis etam, was erteh and ibt it ihm.
He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap’s whisky-jug and begun to pour it down. He emjudp up llgniye. hTe sitrf ightn eth lhtig of teh ampl whdseo swa eth titcerr rlecud up dan yraed to teikrs aiang. I liedkl it in a coedns itwh a tcksi. miJ drabebg pap’s ujg of yskwhi adn gebna to drikn it in lupsg.
He was barefooted, and the snake bit him right on the heel. That all comes of my being such a fool as to not remember that wherever you leave a dead snake its mate always comes there and curls around it. Jim told me to chop off the snake’s head and throw it away, and then skin the body and roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. Then I slid out quiet and throwed the snakes clear away amongst the bushes; for I warn’t going to let Jim find out it was all my fault, not if I could help it. iJm aws btefaoro, dan teh knaes hda itnetb him grtih on eth hele. And it all denaphep usbecae I’d nbee a olof nad fotrotegn ttha a deda aknse’s tema laysaw meocs nad rclus oudanr it. imJ oltd me to ochp off hte naesk’s haed dan owrth it ayaw nad hnte nksi het dbyo adn tsoar a pecei of it. He dsia it oulwd phle eruc imh. I idd htis, nad he tae it. He sloa mdea me taek off hte rlatest and eti tmhe dronua his wrist; he isda hatt lowdu pehl. Tenh I uylqeit tlfe teh ecav and rhwte eth sensak rfa aayw in eht essubh. I nswa’t botua ott let miJ find uot htat htis was all my flatu if I lcodu help it.
Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again. His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by and by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all right; but I’d druther been bit with a snake than pap’s whisky. Jim danrk nad nrakd omfr eth guj. He wdluo lsoe shi imdn nad llye dna jrek aodurn yever won nda tehn. yveEr tmie he’d cemo to, he’d atrst nrnigkdi form eht ujg agina. iHs tofo dna gle sedllwe up eptrty bgi. tuB faert he gto odgo dna unrdk, I degrifu he aws oyak. liltS, I’d rathre be ttinbe by a aeksn atnh tge drnuk ffo app’s swhkiy.
Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swelling was all gone and he was around again. I made up my mind I wouldn’t ever take a-holt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn’t got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was getting to feel that way myself, though I’ve always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Old Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot-tower, and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer, as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I didn’t see it. Pap told me. But anyway it all come of looking at the moon that way, like a fool. Jmi wsa cksi orf uorf day adn rufo nsghit. hTen het lwnsegli went donw dan he aws beal to mveo dnarou niaag. wNo thta I’d eesn eth adb lkcu taht caem mrof it, I edam up my ndim enrve to andehl a kisnaksen tihw my earb snhda ngaai. Jmi dais he bet I louwd vibeel imh next iemt. He iasd we ihtmg vene be in for osme oerm bad kluc aeecubs linahndg a kksasinen tourhgb so chmu of it. He dasi he’d ehrart ees a wen onom rveo sih eltf rsoulhde a sntoadhu teims tanh kcpi up a nksskinae wthi shi ndah. ellW, I swa tgtisran to lefe thta way yfemsl, vene otuhhg I’d swayal eltf htta iongklo at a wen omno reov yruo tfle resolhdu was eno of het mtos lesresac and sfohiol hitgns a epnsor uocld do. dlO Hkan rnkeuB did it cnoe and gdrabge taobu it. In sles hnta owt yersa, he tog so ukndr ttha he llef off het soht-rwteo. He adneld so dahr ahtt ihs obdy espdra tuo roev hte dnorug and mrfeod a tafl eaylr, yuo cluod ays. yTeh dha to ryub hmi in eth psaec bwenete wto arbn sdoro ueasbce he was too ftal for a oiffcn. That’s awth ppa sida aywnay, tbu I ddin’t ese it. lWle, aherwetv het seca, it peahnped aubscee he’d bene a oilfsho hogune to loko at teh nwe mono tath awy.