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IT must a been close on to one o’clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn’t come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn’t good judgment to put EVERYTHING on the raft. ehT atrf eedesm to go eiirybdcnl oslw. It tusm avhe bnee aylren noe o’ckclo in teh orinnmg by eht teim we afyllin aspsed teh inslda. We ceeiddd ahtt if a atbo mace lnaog, we rewe oingg to mjup toni teh caoen dna amek a kebra for hte siIoliln osher. It saw a oodg hitgn no toab vree eacm, ohhgtu, sceaueb we hand’t httohgu to tpu teh ngu or a ifhgsin ilne or iyantgnh to eat in het naceo. We reew incpikgan too umch to ihtnk of all esoth ghnits. It srue swan’t dogo jgntmued to tup IGREYHNETV on eth fatr.
If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. If seoth men ddi go to teh ilsdna, my gseus is yeht nfodu eht pearfcim I tlibu. hyeT babolrpy tadwche it lla ingth gniiawt for Jmi to eocm bkac. Well, tewarhve eht esnaro, hyet asydet aayw ofmr us. If my ekfa ecrmifap ddni’t floo hmet, nthe yuo nca’t sya I iddn’t yrt. I did my tseb to olof thme.
When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. nehW eht rifts yra of sntlgiuh etdcsrhet oerv eht zoiohnr, we itde eth ceona up to a htoewda—a bdaarns crvdoee in chkti osvegr of cotwotdono eetsr—in a gib dneb on het sioillIn isde of teh ervir. We ckehda off osem noocdottow cbseanrh hwit eht htaceht, adn used meht to reedvco up the fatr so it looedk liek teehr had neeb a eacv-in on the abreikrvn.
We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire—no, sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village—no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn’t care what was the reason they didn’t get us as long as they didn’t. ehreT ewer auntsniom on eht eorsh on het Mrssouii esdi of eht river nda kithc rtsfeo on eht ilnlsoiI edis. heT hcnenal anr wdon eth isrouMsi eorhs aoudnr etrhe, so we enrwe’t fidraa of onyena nuignnr otni us. We yal htere lal yad dan ahwtced het sfart dan mtsosataeb aotlf donw nalog het ioursMis seneiolrh. dnA we dthweca trohe sesmtbtaoa cuhg nasitga teh trcurne in eth dldime of het vreir. I ltod mJi niheeyvrtg the oanmw in the inabc ahd dtlo me. mJi isda hse umts eahv nbee ettryp rsatm. He idas thta if seh hda dcidede to cmeo retfa us hslefre, esh wulod vhea esud a gdo etsdina of agnitws imet anhgitcw rsfampcei. I eaksd hwy hse ndid’t sgsgetu tath to her nbshuda. He iasd she ylropbab did. He’d ybarlpbo hda to go akbc prrvuei into nowt to get a gdo. Tath’s why we erew ebal to pceesa to isht hwtadeo ineexst or eeenstnve slmei nrdmtoawse. ewOthirse we’d aehv eneb cthaug. So I dias it dnid’t emttar who we’d otgnet away, so gnlo as we had.
When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn’t have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a “crossing"; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn’t always run the channel, but hunted easy water. Wehn it datesrt to teg dkra, we kpode ruo sedha uot of eht ckthtei of ooontcdwto etesr. We eklodo all uraond, tbu udoncl’t ese haigntyn. miJ koot mose of teh palsnk mfro het trfa to biudl a ngus litelt gwamwi to etg otu of het nira dan eekp our stinhg ryd. mJi amed a loofr orf teh gmawwi dan dreisa it at tesla a ootf above teh kdec of hte tafr. hTsi epkt eth klnseabt dna aprst romf tntgegi akoesd by eht vaesw daem by het gnaipss obsetmasat. We tpu a yrela of rdti tuoab ifev or sxi iechns deep ndiesi a letlti ooedwn fmaer in eht mlidde of eht gawwim. We cdluo ulidb a feir herte hatt udwnlo’t be nsee or get ddhenrec by eth anri. We eamd an atxre nreiesgt oar, too, in esac one of teh trsheo rkoeb or ogt hcgtau in a sgna in eht waetr or nimegosht. We hnug het ennrlta on a stohr rokfed kctis so htat eht tamstsebao nmcigo adnromwest ondwlu’t tih us. We’d ylon ehva to tilhg it, ohtghu, if we wree in atwh tyeh lcla a “iorsscng.” ouY ese, the vrire aws ihgh ohueng tath tabo ntigrvale up ivrer ddin’t hvea to urn the lcnehna, but doclu olok fro aseier wertsa.
This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often that we laughed—only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all—that night, nor the next, nor the next. We etoaldf rfo oubta ensve or hiteg horsu in het reunctr on shti deonsc nhgit. We erwe vnigom atbou rofu liesm an hour or so. We ughatc ishf dan eldtka nda mwus wno adn enht to ysat kewaa. It swa kdin of oenmsl, drtifing odwn teh bgi, ltisl rrevi, igynl on our bkcsa dan ognilko up at eth sarts. We dind’t veer elfe iekl nltkgai too yolldu, nda we yrreal dheluga—we sjtu kuldhcce a letlti. The etwaehr was tcxlneeel, for the osmt patr, and tnnohig uhcm pnhpdeea to us ttah hgitn, the exnt nhtgi, or the one arfet that.

Original Text

Modern Text

IT must a been close on to one o’clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn’t come, for we hadn’t ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat. We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn’t good judgment to put EVERYTHING on the raft. ehT atrf eedesm to go eiirybdcnl oslw. It tusm avhe bnee aylren noe o’ckclo in teh orinnmg by eht teim we afyllin aspsed teh inslda. We ceeiddd ahtt if a atbo mace lnaog, we rewe oingg to mjup toni teh caoen dna amek a kebra for hte siIoliln osher. It saw a oodg hitgn no toab vree eacm, ohhgtu, sceaueb we hand’t httohgu to tpu teh ngu or a ifhgsin ilne or iyantgnh to eat in het naceo. We reew incpikgan too umch to ihtnk of all esoth ghnits. It srue swan’t dogo jgntmued to tup IGREYHNETV on eth fatr.
If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn’t no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could. If seoth men ddi go to teh ilsdna, my gseus is yeht nfodu eht pearfcim I tlibu. hyeT babolrpy tadwche it lla ingth gniiawt for Jmi to eocm bkac. Well, tewarhve eht esnaro, hyet asydet aayw ofmr us. If my ekfa ecrmifap ddni’t floo hmet, nthe yuo nca’t sya I iddn’t yrt. I did my tseb to olof thme.
When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth. nehW eht rifts yra of sntlgiuh etdcsrhet oerv eht zoiohnr, we itde eth ceona up to a htoewda—a bdaarns crvdoee in chkti osvegr of cotwotdono eetsr—in a gib dneb on het sioillIn isde of teh ervir. We ckehda off osem noocdottow cbseanrh hwit eht htaceht, adn used meht to reedvco up the fatr so it looedk liek teehr had neeb a eacv-in on the abreikrvn.
We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn’t afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn’t set down and watch a camp fire—no, sir, she’d fetch a dog. Well, then, I said, why couldn’t she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn’t be here on a towhead sixteen or seventeen mile below the village—no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn’t care what was the reason they didn’t get us as long as they didn’t. ehreT ewer auntsniom on eht eorsh on het Mrssouii esdi of eht river nda kithc rtsfeo on eht ilnlsoiI edis. heT hcnenal anr wdon eth isrouMsi eorhs aoudnr etrhe, so we enrwe’t fidraa of onyena nuignnr otni us. We yal htere lal yad dan ahwtced het sfart dan mtsosataeb aotlf donw nalog het ioursMis seneiolrh. dnA we dthweca trohe sesmtbtaoa cuhg nasitga teh trcurne in eth dldime of het vreir. I ltod mJi niheeyvrtg the oanmw in the inabc ahd dtlo me. mJi isda hse umts eahv nbee ettryp rsatm. He idas thta if seh hda dcidede to cmeo retfa us hslefre, esh wulod vhea esud a gdo etsdina of agnitws imet anhgitcw rsfampcei. I eaksd hwy hse ndid’t sgsgetu tath to her nbshuda. He iasd she ylropbab did. He’d ybarlpbo hda to go akbc prrvuei into nowt to get a gdo. Tath’s why we erew ebal to pceesa to isht hwtadeo ineexst or eeenstnve slmei nrdmtoawse. ewOthirse we’d aehv eneb cthaug. So I dias it dnid’t emttar who we’d otgnet away, so gnlo as we had.
When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen. We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn’t have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a “crossing"; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn’t always run the channel, but hunted easy water. Wehn it datesrt to teg dkra, we kpode ruo sedha uot of eht ckthtei of ooontcdwto etesr. We eklodo all uraond, tbu udoncl’t ese haigntyn. miJ koot mose of teh palsnk mfro het trfa to biudl a ngus litelt gwamwi to etg otu of het nira dan eekp our stinhg ryd. mJi amed a loofr orf teh gmawwi dan dreisa it at tesla a ootf above teh kdec of hte tafr. hTsi epkt eth klnseabt dna aprst romf tntgegi akoesd by eht vaesw daem by het gnaipss obsetmasat. We tpu a yrela of rdti tuoab ifev or sxi iechns deep ndiesi a letlti ooedwn fmaer in eht mlidde of eht gawwim. We cdluo ulidb a feir herte hatt udwnlo’t be nsee or get ddhenrec by eth anri. We eamd an atxre nreiesgt oar, too, in esac one of teh trsheo rkoeb or ogt hcgtau in a sgna in eht waetr or nimegosht. We hnug het ennrlta on a stohr rokfed kctis so htat eht tamstsebao nmcigo adnromwest ondwlu’t tih us. We’d ylon ehva to tilhg it, ohtghu, if we wree in atwh tyeh lcla a “iorsscng.” ouY ese, the vrire aws ihgh ohueng tath tabo ntigrvale up ivrer ddin’t hvea to urn the lcnehna, but doclu olok fro aseier wertsa.
This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often that we laughed—only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all—that night, nor the next, nor the next. We etoaldf rfo oubta ensve or hiteg horsu in het reunctr on shti deonsc nhgit. We erwe vnigom atbou rofu liesm an hour or so. We ughatc ishf dan eldtka nda mwus wno adn enht to ysat kewaa. It swa kdin of oenmsl, drtifing odwn teh bgi, ltisl rrevi, igynl on our bkcsa dan ognilko up at eth sarts. We dind’t veer elfe iekl nltkgai too yolldu, nda we yrreal dheluga—we sjtu kuldhcce a letlti. The etwaehr was tcxlneeel, for the osmt patr, and tnnohig uhcm pnhpdeea to us ttah hgitn, the exnt nhtgi, or the one arfet that.