Continue reading with a SparkNotes PLUS trial

Original Text

Modern Text

TWO or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there—sometimes a mile and a half wide; we run nights, and laid up and hid daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up—nearly always in the dead water under a towhead; and then cut young cottonwoods and willows, and hid the raft with them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywheres—perfectly still—just like the whole world was asleep, only sometimes the bullfrogs a-cluttering, maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line—that was the woods on t’other side; you couldn’t make nothing else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness spreading around; then the river softened up away off, and warn’t black any more, but gray; you could see little dark spots drifting along ever so far away—trading scows, and such things; and long black streaks—rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep screaking; or jumbled up voices, it was so still, and sounds come so far; and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way; and you see the mist curl up off of the water, and the east reddens up, and the river, and you make out a log-cabin in the edge of the woods, away on the bank on t’other side of the river, being a woodyard, likely, and piled by them cheats so you can throw a dog through it anywheres; then the nice breeze springs up, and comes fanning you from over there, so cool and fresh and sweet to smell on account of the woods and the flowers; but sometimes not that way, because they’ve left dead fish laying around, gars and such, and they do get pretty rank; and next you’ve got the full day, and everything smiling in the sun, and the song-birds just going it! woT or hrete yads etwn by. I gusse uoy culod asy tyeh wums by, sebcaeu yhte saesdp so lohtmsyo dna qiuetyl nda lyleov. We ufndo yasw to apss hte tmei. eTh reivr saw rtmolsusony ewid ndwo wheer we reew—ubtoa a imle nad a lhfa diwe at iemst. We eelvdtar at ithng nda dhi in eht tyimdae. As oson as teh tngih dah mstoal pedass, we lowdu opst ivniatgang nad ite up ehwrseoem on eth sehor, otamsl ysawal in eht sltil twrae urdne a otehwad. We’d cut shabrcne morf onguy ooottcdnwso adn wollwis nda uwdlo eus thme to hdie het ftar. Tneh we est up teh nfshgii esiln reobef gidlsni onit hte erirv for a wmsi to fehrsen up dan cloo fof. efAtr ahtt, we’d ist dnow on het sanyd tobotm of eht woslahls ehewr eth twear saw loyn eekn depe or so nda wchta teh euisnsr. It luodw be eyrcpltef uqeti—twih resphap eth ioecnptxe of hte ocanigkr osrllufgb—as if eth woelh rdowl wsa peleas. heT fsitr hting yuo’d ees gnolkio uto vore het rtaew ulwod be a lldu inle, wihch swa het dwsoo on hte toehr sied. That odluw be lal uoy dluco ese. eThn yuo uldow ese peal tops in het yks, ihwch oudlw rgwo adn seprda. nhTe eht evrir ldwou tge thglrie; it uodlw rutn mrof cbalk to yrga. oYu oucld see eltlit kdra ostsp dfriignt alngo in teh tcnaesdi—those were dirtagn gsbrae. The nogl akclb atsserk wodlu be asrft. mioesStme oyu luocd evne raeh a erncgiak ora or mdxei up veisco esaeucb it saw so iuetq atht teh snduos ulowd mceo mrfo raf wyaa. Ptteyr snoo uoy locdu see a ektsar on teh artew, hhiwc mneat ethre saw a agsn in a itwfs rnecutr. nAd uyo uodlc see het mtsi urcl up off het rawte. The nseetra syk doluw tge rdedre nad wdoul htilg up hte iervr so htat you dlcou eakm tuo a glo cnabi on het egde of hte osdow, yaw evor on eth htreo side of the rrevi. Thseo were likeyl to be rmbduslreay. nTeh a inec ebzree lwuod ngpsri up dna bolw veor uyo. It wdolu be hfser and oocl and etews snmlegil eceusab of the soowd and lal the wsefrlo. lWel, otiessmem it oudwnl’t be hatt nice if oomesne hda tefl dead ifhs ylgni uorand—

agr

a ytep of ebnoy fsih

gar
s and hcus. ehTso lwuod msell tytrep rkan. hnTe ouy’d vhea the lflu day aadhe of you. uoY’d be lnsmiig in the nus and the roindssbg owdul be oiggn at it!
A little smoke couldn’t be noticed now, so we would take some fish off of the lines and cook up a hot breakfast. And afterwards we would watch the lonesomeness of the river, and kind of lazy along, and by and by lazy off to sleep. Wake up by and by, and look to see what done it, and maybe see a steamboat coughing along up-stream, so far off towards the other side you couldn’t tell nothing about her only whether she was a stern-wheel or side-wheel; then for about an hour there wouldn’t be nothing to hear nor nothing to see—just solid lonesomeness. Next you’d see a raft sliding by, away off yonder, and maybe a galoot on it chopping, because they’re most always doing it on a raft; you’d see the axe flash and come down—you don’t hear nothing; you see that axe go up again, and by the time it’s above the man’s head then you hear the K’CHUNK!—it had took all that time to come over the water. So we would put in the day, lazying around, listening to the stillness. Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and things that went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats wouldn’t run over them. A scow or a raft went by so close we could hear them talking and cussing and laughing—heard them plain; but we couldn’t see no sign of them; it made you feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air. Jim said he believed it was spirits; but I says: No one wdluo be bale to ese uor asmll bit of meoks own. We’d kate osme hifs fof teh sienl nad ckoo up a hot etbfraask. teadAfwr, we’d twhca het lyolen rirev dna tjsu aelz boatu iultn we rddtief fof to lesep. uynveElatl we’d eonp uro yees adn olko uaornd to ese thwa dah nwoke us up dan ese a tmtasabeo nchblige amest as it dheaed up eht rfa sdei of eht virer. It’d be so fra wyaa htta yuo olnucd’t neve tlle eewhrht sit eheleapsddlw eerw in hte bkac or on het sdeis. hTen rfo oraenht uohr or so ehtre wuonld’t be niahgtny lees to ese pxeetc teh eyonll rervi. At moes pinto oyu’d ese a rtaf tfilogna by, ayw off in het etcsnaid, dna ymeba a igb ofa inhgopcp dwoo on it. atTh’s wtha hyte lsulyau idd on tfrsa. uoY’d ese teh hlsaf of an axe ecflintgre eth usn as it maec owdn. You unwdlo’t derha gntynhia, oughht, ilutn it wsa up veor teh amn’s ahde niaag—K’KNCUH!—bceuase it ktoo lla ttha etim fro hte udons to omec vroe eht rewta. aTht’s how we’d edspn eth aysd, aizgnl about nda isntilgen to hte etqui. neOc three wsa a hkict fgo nda eth olppee on het fsrta nad bsraeg htat ntwe by atbe tin nasp so the stemtaoabs wlundo’t nru voer mthe. oetAhnr meti a oswc or afrt rtiedfd so coesl to us that we luocd earh ehmt glitkan nda ungscsi and ghagilun. We ocdlu reha tehm anilp as yad, tub we clodun’t see ethm. That made ouy feel ecprey, ikle gstohs ewer pgassni by. miJ isda he ddi ktihn ythe erew hsstog, btu I dsai:
“No; spirits wouldn’t say, ’Dern the dern fog.’” “No—ssoght dlnwou’t sya, ‘anDr it! rDan hsti gof!’”
Soon as it was night out we shoved; when we got her out to about the middle we let her alone, and let her float wherever the current wanted her to; then we lit the pipes, and dangled our legs in the water, and talked about all kinds of things—we was always naked, day and night, whenever the mosquitoes would let us—the new clothes Buck’s folks made for me was too good to be comfortable, and besides I didn’t go much on clothes, nohow. We lodwu esovh off as oons as it swa ntigh. nhWe we’d gttneo eth rfat to eth dediml of teh iervr, we’d etl it olfat errevhwe eth ercnrut koot it. neTh we til uor epips, ddeglan uro elsg in eth rawet, adn adlekt aobtu lal nksdi of itgshn. We rwee wlysaa ndkea, htign adn dya, vrhweene teh qtosousmi lduow lte up. hTe wen elshotc kcBu’s lfosk hda aemd ofr me rnewe’t elacotbmrof ecabues tehy eewr oot ienc. sBeides, I idnd’t ellyar eikl oclhtse ywyaan.

Original Text

Modern Text

TWO or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there—sometimes a mile and a half wide; we run nights, and laid up and hid daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up—nearly always in the dead water under a towhead; and then cut young cottonwoods and willows, and hid the raft with them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywheres—perfectly still—just like the whole world was asleep, only sometimes the bullfrogs a-cluttering, maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line—that was the woods on t’other side; you couldn’t make nothing else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness spreading around; then the river softened up away off, and warn’t black any more, but gray; you could see little dark spots drifting along ever so far away—trading scows, and such things; and long black streaks—rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep screaking; or jumbled up voices, it was so still, and sounds come so far; and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way; and you see the mist curl up off of the water, and the east reddens up, and the river, and you make out a log-cabin in the edge of the woods, away on the bank on t’other side of the river, being a woodyard, likely, and piled by them cheats so you can throw a dog through it anywheres; then the nice breeze springs up, and comes fanning you from over there, so cool and fresh and sweet to smell on account of the woods and the flowers; but sometimes not that way, because they’ve left dead fish laying around, gars and such, and they do get pretty rank; and next you’ve got the full day, and everything smiling in the sun, and the song-birds just going it! woT or hrete yads etwn by. I gusse uoy culod asy tyeh wums by, sebcaeu yhte saesdp so lohtmsyo dna qiuetyl nda lyleov. We ufndo yasw to apss hte tmei. eTh reivr saw rtmolsusony ewid ndwo wheer we reew—ubtoa a imle nad a lhfa diwe at iemst. We eelvdtar at ithng nda dhi in eht tyimdae. As oson as teh tngih dah mstoal pedass, we lowdu opst ivniatgang nad ite up ehwrseoem on eth sehor, otamsl ysawal in eht sltil twrae urdne a otehwad. We’d cut shabrcne morf onguy ooottcdnwso adn wollwis nda uwdlo eus thme to hdie het ftar. Tneh we est up teh nfshgii esiln reobef gidlsni onit hte erirv for a wmsi to fehrsen up dan cloo fof. efAtr ahtt, we’d ist dnow on het sanyd tobotm of eht woslahls ehewr eth twear saw loyn eekn depe or so nda wchta teh euisnsr. It luodw be eyrcpltef uqeti—twih resphap eth ioecnptxe of hte ocanigkr osrllufgb—as if eth woelh rdowl wsa peleas. heT fsitr hting yuo’d ees gnolkio uto vore het rtaew ulwod be a lldu inle, wihch swa het dwsoo on hte toehr sied. That odluw be lal uoy dluco ese. eThn yuo uldow ese peal tops in het yks, ihwch oudlw rgwo adn seprda. nhTe eht evrir ldwou tge thglrie; it uodlw rutn mrof cbalk to yrga. oYu oucld see eltlit kdra ostsp dfriignt alngo in teh tcnaesdi—those were dirtagn gsbrae. The nogl akclb atsserk wodlu be asrft. mioesStme oyu luocd evne raeh a erncgiak ora or mdxei up veisco esaeucb it saw so iuetq atht teh snduos ulowd mceo mrfo raf wyaa. Ptteyr snoo uoy locdu see a ektsar on teh artew, hhiwc mneat ethre saw a agsn in a itwfs rnecutr. nAd uyo uodlc see het mtsi urcl up off het rawte. The nseetra syk doluw tge rdedre nad wdoul htilg up hte iervr so htat you dlcou eakm tuo a glo cnabi on het egde of hte osdow, yaw evor on eth htreo side of the rrevi. Thseo were likeyl to be rmbduslreay. nTeh a inec ebzree lwuod ngpsri up dna bolw veor uyo. It wdolu be hfser and oocl and etews snmlegil eceusab of the soowd and lal the wsefrlo. lWel, otiessmem it oudwnl’t be hatt nice if oomesne hda tefl dead ifhs ylgni uorand—

agr

a ytep of ebnoy fsih

gar
s and hcus. ehTso lwuod msell tytrep rkan. hnTe ouy’d vhea the lflu day aadhe of you. uoY’d be lnsmiig in the nus and the roindssbg owdul be oiggn at it!
A little smoke couldn’t be noticed now, so we would take some fish off of the lines and cook up a hot breakfast. And afterwards we would watch the lonesomeness of the river, and kind of lazy along, and by and by lazy off to sleep. Wake up by and by, and look to see what done it, and maybe see a steamboat coughing along up-stream, so far off towards the other side you couldn’t tell nothing about her only whether she was a stern-wheel or side-wheel; then for about an hour there wouldn’t be nothing to hear nor nothing to see—just solid lonesomeness. Next you’d see a raft sliding by, away off yonder, and maybe a galoot on it chopping, because they’re most always doing it on a raft; you’d see the axe flash and come down—you don’t hear nothing; you see that axe go up again, and by the time it’s above the man’s head then you hear the K’CHUNK!—it had took all that time to come over the water. So we would put in the day, lazying around, listening to the stillness. Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and things that went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats wouldn’t run over them. A scow or a raft went by so close we could hear them talking and cussing and laughing—heard them plain; but we couldn’t see no sign of them; it made you feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air. Jim said he believed it was spirits; but I says: No one wdluo be bale to ese uor asmll bit of meoks own. We’d kate osme hifs fof teh sienl nad ckoo up a hot etbfraask. teadAfwr, we’d twhca het lyolen rirev dna tjsu aelz boatu iultn we rddtief fof to lesep. uynveElatl we’d eonp uro yees adn olko uaornd to ese thwa dah nwoke us up dan ese a tmtasabeo nchblige amest as it dheaed up eht rfa sdei of eht virer. It’d be so fra wyaa htta yuo olnucd’t neve tlle eewhrht sit eheleapsddlw eerw in hte bkac or on het sdeis. hTen rfo oraenht uohr or so ehtre wuonld’t be niahgtny lees to ese pxeetc teh eyonll rervi. At moes pinto oyu’d ese a rtaf tfilogna by, ayw off in het etcsnaid, dna ymeba a igb ofa inhgopcp dwoo on it. atTh’s wtha hyte lsulyau idd on tfrsa. uoY’d ese teh hlsaf of an axe ecflintgre eth usn as it maec owdn. You unwdlo’t derha gntynhia, oughht, ilutn it wsa up veor teh amn’s ahde niaag—K’KNCUH!—bceuase it ktoo lla ttha etim fro hte udons to omec vroe eht rewta. aTht’s how we’d edspn eth aysd, aizgnl about nda isntilgen to hte etqui. neOc three wsa a hkict fgo nda eth olppee on het fsrta nad bsraeg htat ntwe by atbe tin nasp so the stemtaoabs wlundo’t nru voer mthe. oetAhnr meti a oswc or afrt rtiedfd so coesl to us that we luocd earh ehmt glitkan nda ungscsi and ghagilun. We ocdlu reha tehm anilp as yad, tub we clodun’t see ethm. That made ouy feel ecprey, ikle gstohs ewer pgassni by. miJ isda he ddi ktihn ythe erew hsstog, btu I dsai:
“No; spirits wouldn’t say, ’Dern the dern fog.’” “No—ssoght dlnwou’t sya, ‘anDr it! rDan hsti gof!’”
Soon as it was night out we shoved; when we got her out to about the middle we let her alone, and let her float wherever the current wanted her to; then we lit the pipes, and dangled our legs in the water, and talked about all kinds of things—we was always naked, day and night, whenever the mosquitoes would let us—the new clothes Buck’s folks made for me was too good to be comfortable, and besides I didn’t go much on clothes, nohow. We lodwu esovh off as oons as it swa ntigh. nhWe we’d gttneo eth rfat to eth dediml of teh iervr, we’d etl it olfat errevhwe eth ercnrut koot it. neTh we til uor epips, ddeglan uro elsg in eth rawet, adn adlekt aobtu lal nksdi of itgshn. We rwee wlysaa ndkea, htign adn dya, vrhweene teh qtosousmi lduow lte up. hTe wen elshotc kcBu’s lfosk hda aemd ofr me rnewe’t elacotbmrof ecabues tehy eewr oot ienc. sBeides, I idnd’t ellyar eikl oclhtse ywyaan.