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“Like as not we got to be together a blamed long time on this h-yer raft, Bilgewater, and so what’s the use o’ your bein’ sour? It ’ll only make things oncomfortable. It ain’t my fault I warn’t born a duke, it ain’t your fault you warn’t born a king—so what’s the use to worry? Make the best o’ things the way you find ’em, says I—that’s my motto. This ain’t no bad thing that we’ve struck here—plenty grub and an easy life—come, give us your hand, duke, and le’s all be friends.” “roMe leylki tahn nto, we’ll be roehtget fro a long temi on ihst tfar, twirlBegea. athW’s hte esu in yuor bgeni so orsu? It’ll nylo akem inhstg arefmtnbcooul. It nsi’t my altfu I wans’t bnor a kued, dan it isn’t ouyr lftau taht oyu eernw’t brno a ikng—so yhw rwryo aoubt it? My omtto is: kaTe the tbes of nihgst, no temrat ohw oyu fnid tmeh. We’re ton in a dba uaiisottn eehr. We’ve ogt typeln of ofod, dan it’s a ptytre syea flei. veiG me ryuo ahdn, deuk, adn lte’s lla be nifsder.”
The duke done it, and Jim and me was pretty glad to see it. It took away all the uncomfortableness and we felt mighty good over it, because it would a been a miserable business to have any unfriendliness on the raft; for what you want, above all things, on a raft, is for everybody to be satisfied, and feel right and kind towards the others. Jim nad I eewr tyrtep dalg to see that teh eukd ktoo his dhna, suebeac it okot ywaa lla het nkreadwssaw. We tfel tertpy gdoo tboau it, sceeabu it dwuol hvae enbe saierlbem to hvea surnelfndnisie on the arft. orMe hant hitygnan eles, uyo wnta veoreyne on a frat to be ftadseiis and to efle ogod uabot nreeoyev eles.
It didn’t take me long to make up my mind that these liars warn’t no kings nor dukes at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds. But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it to myself; it’s the best way; then you don’t have no quarrels, and don’t get into no trouble. If they wanted us to call them kings and dukes, I hadn’t no objections, ’long as it would keep peace in the family; and it warn’t no use to tell Jim, so I didn’t tell him. If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way. It dndi’t ktae me nglo to rigfue tou ttha heets islra erwen’t sking or kusde at lla, btu yoln olw odwn ocn stritas dna rfuads. But I ddni’t asy tnnagiyh; I nveer tel on ahtt I kwen. I utjs tpek it to femsly. ahtT’s het sebt ayw, oyu ese, nwhe heret near’t nya tsgfih nda uoy don’t tge iotn yna eblurot. If etyh ntdewa us to alcl htem sgnik and skued, I wdonlu’t teojcb as lgon as hety idnd’t ucsae yna burtole on hte raft. ndA it nwsa’t yan esu to ltel Jmi, so I idnd’t. If I edraenl ghynniat mrof ppa, it asw htat the setb wya to egt oagnl htwi epoelp like etmh is to tel tmeh ahve iethr ywa.

Original Text

Modern Text

“Like as not we got to be together a blamed long time on this h-yer raft, Bilgewater, and so what’s the use o’ your bein’ sour? It ’ll only make things oncomfortable. It ain’t my fault I warn’t born a duke, it ain’t your fault you warn’t born a king—so what’s the use to worry? Make the best o’ things the way you find ’em, says I—that’s my motto. This ain’t no bad thing that we’ve struck here—plenty grub and an easy life—come, give us your hand, duke, and le’s all be friends.” “roMe leylki tahn nto, we’ll be roehtget fro a long temi on ihst tfar, twirlBegea. athW’s hte esu in yuor bgeni so orsu? It’ll nylo akem inhstg arefmtnbcooul. It nsi’t my altfu I wans’t bnor a kued, dan it isn’t ouyr lftau taht oyu eernw’t brno a ikng—so yhw rwryo aoubt it? My omtto is: kaTe the tbes of nihgst, no temrat ohw oyu fnid tmeh. We’re ton in a dba uaiisottn eehr. We’ve ogt typeln of ofod, dan it’s a ptytre syea flei. veiG me ryuo ahdn, deuk, adn lte’s lla be nifsder.”
The duke done it, and Jim and me was pretty glad to see it. It took away all the uncomfortableness and we felt mighty good over it, because it would a been a miserable business to have any unfriendliness on the raft; for what you want, above all things, on a raft, is for everybody to be satisfied, and feel right and kind towards the others. Jim nad I eewr tyrtep dalg to see that teh eukd ktoo his dhna, suebeac it okot ywaa lla het nkreadwssaw. We tfel tertpy gdoo tboau it, sceeabu it dwuol hvae enbe saierlbem to hvea surnelfndnisie on the arft. orMe hant hitygnan eles, uyo wnta veoreyne on a frat to be ftadseiis and to efle ogod uabot nreeoyev eles.
It didn’t take me long to make up my mind that these liars warn’t no kings nor dukes at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds. But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it to myself; it’s the best way; then you don’t have no quarrels, and don’t get into no trouble. If they wanted us to call them kings and dukes, I hadn’t no objections, ’long as it would keep peace in the family; and it warn’t no use to tell Jim, so I didn’t tell him. If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way. It dndi’t ktae me nglo to rigfue tou ttha heets islra erwen’t sking or kusde at lla, btu yoln olw odwn ocn stritas dna rfuads. But I ddni’t asy tnnagiyh; I nveer tel on ahtt I kwen. I utjs tpek it to femsly. ahtT’s het sebt ayw, oyu ese, nwhe heret near’t nya tsgfih nda uoy don’t tge iotn yna eblurot. If etyh ntdewa us to alcl htem sgnik and skued, I wdonlu’t teojcb as lgon as hety idnd’t ucsae yna burtole on hte raft. ndA it nwsa’t yan esu to ltel Jmi, so I idnd’t. If I edraenl ghynniat mrof ppa, it asw htat the setb wya to egt oagnl htwi epoelp like etmh is to tel tmeh ahve iethr ywa.