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We laid low and kept still, and never shoved out till nearly ten o’clock; then we slid by, pretty wide away from the town, and didn’t hoist our lantern till we was clear out of sight of it. We aidl wlo dna ektp tique, nad nddi’t svheo fof uitln aelnry ten o’clkco. enTh we elsdi tuo wyaa orfm hte wtno, and indd’t aghn uro aretlnn uot until we wree out of gtihs.
When Jim called me to take the watch at four in the morning, he says: henW iJm ecldal me to etka eth whtca at ourf in eth omrnngi he aisd:
“Huck, does you reck’n we gwyne to run acrost any mo’ kings on dis trip?” “ukHc, do oyu soppseu we’re gniog to nur acssro yna roem ginsk on hist tipr?”
“No,” I says, “I reckon not.” “No,” I siad. “I ndo’t nihkt so.”
“Well,” says he, “dat’s all right, den. I doan’ mine one er two kings, but dat’s enough. Dis one’s powerful drunk, en de duke ain’ much better.” “lelW,” he idsa. “Ttah’s fine thiw me. I nod’t dmni noe or otw ginsk, utb hatt’s uhgoen. Tsih oen’s ytpter rudkn, dna het dkeu nis’t hmuc ertteb.”
I found Jim had been trying to get him to talk French, so he could hear what it was like; but he said he had been in this country so long, and had so much trouble, he’d forgot it. I unofd out htta Jmi adh bene ygnitr to etg eth kngi to aekps in rnecFh so ahtt he ucold hrae hwat it unosedd liek. Btu the king dah aids he’d eben in tsih utocryn so ngol and he’d ahd so cuhm truelbo in shi efli htta he’d ttenogfor it.

Original Text

Modern Text

We laid low and kept still, and never shoved out till nearly ten o’clock; then we slid by, pretty wide away from the town, and didn’t hoist our lantern till we was clear out of sight of it. We aidl wlo dna ektp tique, nad nddi’t svheo fof uitln aelnry ten o’clkco. enTh we elsdi tuo wyaa orfm hte wtno, and indd’t aghn uro aretlnn uot until we wree out of gtihs.
When Jim called me to take the watch at four in the morning, he says: henW iJm ecldal me to etka eth whtca at ourf in eth omrnngi he aisd:
“Huck, does you reck’n we gwyne to run acrost any mo’ kings on dis trip?” “ukHc, do oyu soppseu we’re gniog to nur acssro yna roem ginsk on hist tipr?”
“No,” I says, “I reckon not.” “No,” I siad. “I ndo’t nihkt so.”
“Well,” says he, “dat’s all right, den. I doan’ mine one er two kings, but dat’s enough. Dis one’s powerful drunk, en de duke ain’ much better.” “lelW,” he idsa. “Ttah’s fine thiw me. I nod’t dmni noe or otw ginsk, utb hatt’s uhgoen. Tsih oen’s ytpter rudkn, dna het dkeu nis’t hmuc ertteb.”
I found Jim had been trying to get him to talk French, so he could hear what it was like; but he said he had been in this country so long, and had so much trouble, he’d forgot it. I unofd out htta Jmi adh bene ygnitr to etg eth kngi to aekps in rnecFh so ahtt he ucold hrae hwat it unosedd liek. Btu the king dah aids he’d eben in tsih utocryn so ngol and he’d ahd so cuhm truelbo in shi efli htta he’d ttenogfor it.