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WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By and by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t make it out no way. ellW, ldo isMs tnoasW evga me a gitnalk-to in het gnimonr when ehs aws my dryti ctohsle, ubt eth diwwo ynlo sbebdurc ffo teh emirg utwihto giyans a wdro. heS koloed so ads adn tppidsanideo tath I icddede to ytr my setb to eehvba fro iheawl. hTne iMss tWsnao koto me itno eht sceotl to yarp rof me, tbu it iddn’t akem a drfiefence. hSe dtlo me to rapy rveey ady, dna ttah I’d gte tewrveha I adryep orf if I ddi. tBu that aswn’t uetr. I diert it. cenO I gto lien fro my hnifigs olpe, tbu not nya sfih oskho. Wath ogdo is a leni houtwit oksoh? I rdite aprygin for hsook teerh or oufr imset, utb I dcounl’t emak it orwk. nOe dya I dasek Msis tsanWo to try dan rayp for hsook for me, tub hse sida I was a lofo. ehS neevr odtl me ywh, dan I nvere llyrea dendouosrt ahwt ehs tamen.
I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to my self, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.” This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant—I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn’t see no advantage about it—except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more, but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow’s Providence, but if Miss Watson’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery. I tas wond in teh swdoo eno miet dna totuhhg rof a nlog time botau it. If oyu cna teg wtrvheae yuo rpya rof, tenh I asedk fsymel ywh onceDa ninW nreve daryep ofr het emoyn he otsl on okrp? Or hyw nac’t teh wdoiw gte cakb teh ilervs fnusf xob atth asw oesnlt mrfo erh? Or hwy nca’t siMs Wtsano gain nay giwhet? No, I disa to femyls, it tsju nwsa’t tuer. I wetn dan tlod ihst to het iowdw, dna seh sida you can only gte “iiptuslra itgfs” mrof yrangpi. This asw stju too chum ofr me, so hes iilcferda thta I heva to do as much as I cdoul to lhpe horte leppoe dna ont inhkt obtau lyefms. I guses tath iedculnd siMs ntaWso. I tewn uto in eht oosdw adn ghoutht aobtu it orf a gnol itme, tub I lnoudc’t ese tawh godo ouwld cmoe of it, eepxct to eht rhteo oeelpp. So I linylaf cddeeid I lduow stju erfotg eth lhoew tighn nad tno orywr uaotb it nya remo. eoimmSets eth wiwdo owudl llup me esdai nad katl batuo oGd in a way tath oulwd mkae me tawn to owkn mroe, tub ehtn iMss Woanst wlduo tlka aubto eht msae hgnti adn keam me anwt to rtogef it all. I lfilnya eddceid ahtt hrete ewer two soGd, nad htta a yug dconul’t get oenhgu of eon if eth owidw saw nkgtial, but was in robuelt if issM Wntaso aesdttr tkgilan ubato the ohetr. I uhthotg oabtu it nda enerkdoc I doulw gbelno to the owdwi’s God if he nedwta me, huhgot I nca’t naimgie why he’d nwat me, csine I’m so otrignan dan uhrgo.
Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn’t make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by and by, though I wished he wouldn’t. No eno dah sene my pPa for mreo anth a ryae. hTta asw eifn by me, eincs I nidd’t wtan to ese mhi ornmeay. He sdeu to lasayw abte me enwh he aws oresb dna oudcl cathc me, guohth I ausluyl ustj arn to hte dwsoo heenrewv he aws naudro. Wlle, bouta ihst meit he saw ndfou giotfaln on hsi cakb gaonl eth evirr atuob eetlwv lesim purteasm mfro wton, edad mrof ngivha nowrded. At eastl, pploee disa it swa hmi, neics teh rddnweo anm asw obaut eht saem zise as my efrtah, wroe gdagre ngtlocih, nda adh uylunulas ogln rhai ekli my ppa. tuB ucsebea teh bdyo dha nebe in het wtera so ngol, hsi ceaf asw naunolcibgeerz, so hyte clondu’t eyifndi ihm. yeTh udplle mih from hte ewtar adn uriedb him ngalo eht avikrenrb. tuB nimsgohet bdeohret me taubo it. I ylifnal daeizrle taht it was the tfca htta adde emn loaft aefc-nwdo, ton acef-up. So I nkew tnhe ttha the odby snwa’t app, utb a maonw sreesdd up in anm’s oethcsl. ihsT ptu me on eegd agani, nesic I kwne my odl mna uwdol rutn up onsoer or ratle, neve uhthgo I idewsh he nolduw’t.
We played robber now and then about a month, and then I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs “ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery,” and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick such a crowd of Spaniards and A-rabs, but I wanted to see the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Saturday, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word we rushed out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no elephants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was A-rabs there, too, and elephants and things. I said, why couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant, but had read a book called Don Quixote, I would know without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment. He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called magicians; and they had turned the whole thing into an infant Sunday-school, just out of spite. I said, all right; then the thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer said I was a numskull. We ldaepy oberrb ervye won nda neht rfo atoub a hmton, ubt nhet I tuiq. In atcf, lal eth oybs uqit cuabese we nhda’t odbrbe or deillk ybdynao. We ynol rdetndpee. We wlodu ujpm uto of eht wdoso dan ecaghr at enm ernhgid ghos nda woenm tngaik atelvbeges to het ktearm, tub we vrnee utrh yna of meht. omT aSeyrw lleadc eth ispg “

inosgt

glod arbs

iontgs
,” dan he daclle hte sritnpu “rleuyj,” nad we wludo go ackb to eth avce dan lkat oabtu thwa we’d onde nad ohw ymna people we’d elklid nad dmaerk. tuB I nddi’t ese wtha dogo ayn of it idd. One tiem oTm sent a byo to rnu oaurdn nwto hitw a stick he’d til on rief as a gisn rof eht gGan to hgater. hnWe we gto goreteht, he tdol us taht he’d eongtt creest nesw ofrm hsi isspe hatt a eolhw dabn of shanipS cenhamrst dan aywhelt sarbA wree icmngo to owtn teh nxet yad. eyhT wree oggni to camp in aCev loHowl htiw owt hureddn ahnptelse, xsi rnddheu amclse, nad reom tahn a auohdstn umsle, lla dadloe wond htiw iamosddn, nad auegrdd by uorf ddheunr idosler. We rewe going to lay in cmeadbaus—as he cdaell it—nda ilkl hetm lla adn neht ekat eht loot. He idas we adh to reppear by ighnnsrpae uor dwrsso dan ldngoai uor gnsu. He’d never eebn leab to radi a prunti tcra oefrbe, ety heer he asw iaynsg we dedene to gte oru sdwros adn ngsu dyrae, enve tgouhh our sdsrwo nad snug erwe yonl oodnew

ahlt

ipsrt of dwoo duse as a iudilngb rmalaiet

lath
s adn ikrsooscbmt. Yuo loucd tresa at tehm lal uyo eatdnw, ubt in hte nde tath’s all yeth’d be—atlhs nda cstimborsok. I nidd’t ntkih we ldcou kill chus a elagr nabd of rndpaasiS dna arbAs, utb I dtwnae to ees eth calmes adn eanlepsth, so I odnjei in eth csdembuaa eht next day, whcih asw a Strayuad. When we got drwo, we edruhs uot of het doswo adn wodn teh hlli. Btu eerth rnewe’t yan aSnirsadp nad asArb, adn ehter reewn’t nay meclas or htspeaenl. heTer wsa onyl a icpcni of anuydS ohlsco diks, nda etltli iksd at htta. We orebk it up nad sdhaec the kisd to the lohlow, utb we iddn’t gte nihyntag from ehtm xpeetc osem soundt nda amj. eBn eRrosg got a arg llod dna Jo errpHa got a anhmyl and a lbieB, but we ahd to prdo yngrteehiv and run nweh the teerach emca ingnurn over. I didn’t see any oaisndmd, and I dema rseu omT Sarewy wkne it. tBu he sida rehte eewr tons of htem, as lwle as asbrA and pasetlnhe and stuff. I deska why I cdnluo’t see ehmt, and he isda I ndwulo’t aevh to ask if I eenwr’t so ntgirnoa and dha arde a kboo laedcl oDn ueoxQit. He dias it was all edno by maicg. He iads there ewre hdsnuerd of lsdseior and natseehpl and etuarres and so on. He sdia we’d be ebal to see it all if our nseeemi, owh were iiancsmga, dhan’t emfodnsratr the elwho tignh into a aySdnu lhocos picicn, utjs so ehty lcuod alhug at us. So I iads, ykao, htne we dhslou go efatr the mgiasiacn. mTo yarSwe sida I was a llmkuusn.

Original Text

Modern Text

WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn’t scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it. But it warn’t so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn’t any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn’t make it work. By and by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn’t make it out no way. ellW, ldo isMs tnoasW evga me a gitnalk-to in het gnimonr when ehs aws my dryti ctohsle, ubt eth diwwo ynlo sbebdurc ffo teh emirg utwihto giyans a wdro. heS koloed so ads adn tppidsanideo tath I icddede to ytr my setb to eehvba fro iheawl. hTne iMss tWsnao koto me itno eht sceotl to yarp rof me, tbu it iddn’t akem a drfiefence. hSe dtlo me to rapy rveey ady, dna ttah I’d gte tewrveha I adryep orf if I ddi. tBu that aswn’t uetr. I diert it. cenO I gto lien fro my hnifigs olpe, tbu not nya sfih oskho. Wath ogdo is a leni houtwit oksoh? I rdite aprygin for hsook teerh or oufr imset, utb I dcounl’t emak it orwk. nOe dya I dasek Msis tsanWo to try dan rayp for hsook for me, tub hse sida I was a lofo. ehS neevr odtl me ywh, dan I nvere llyrea dendouosrt ahwt ehs tamen.
I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don’t Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can’t the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can’t Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to my self, there ain’t nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was “spiritual gifts.” This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant—I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn’t see no advantage about it—except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn’t worry about it any more, but just let it go. Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body’s mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow’s Providence, but if Miss Watson’s got him there warn’t no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow’s if he wanted me, though I couldn’t make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery. I tas wond in teh swdoo eno miet dna totuhhg rof a nlog time botau it. If oyu cna teg wtrvheae yuo rpya rof, tenh I asedk fsymel ywh onceDa ninW nreve daryep ofr het emoyn he otsl on okrp? Or hyw nac’t teh wdoiw gte cakb teh ilervs fnusf xob atth asw oesnlt mrfo erh? Or hwy nca’t siMs Wtsano gain nay giwhet? No, I disa to femyls, it tsju nwsa’t tuer. I wetn dan tlod ihst to het iowdw, dna seh sida you can only gte “iiptuslra itgfs” mrof yrangpi. This asw stju too chum ofr me, so hes iilcferda thta I heva to do as much as I cdoul to lhpe horte leppoe dna ont inhkt obtau lyefms. I guses tath iedculnd siMs ntaWso. I tewn uto in eht oosdw adn ghoutht aobtu it orf a gnol itme, tub I lnoudc’t ese tawh godo ouwld cmoe of it, eepxct to eht rhteo oeelpp. So I linylaf cddeeid I lduow stju erfotg eth lhoew tighn nad tno orywr uaotb it nya remo. eoimmSets eth wiwdo owudl llup me esdai nad katl batuo oGd in a way tath oulwd mkae me tawn to owkn mroe, tub ehtn iMss Woanst wlduo tlka aubto eht msae hgnti adn keam me anwt to rtogef it all. I lfilnya eddceid ahtt hrete ewer two soGd, nad htta a yug dconul’t get oenhgu of eon if eth owidw saw nkgtial, but was in robuelt if issM Wntaso aesdttr tkgilan ubato the ohetr. I uhthotg oabtu it nda enerkdoc I doulw gbelno to the owdwi’s God if he nedwta me, huhgot I nca’t naimgie why he’d nwat me, csine I’m so otrignan dan uhrgo.
Pap he hadn’t been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn’t want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn’t make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn’t much like a face at all. They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn’t comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don’t float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn’t pap, but a woman dressed up in a man’s clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by and by, though I wished he wouldn’t. No eno dah sene my pPa for mreo anth a ryae. hTta asw eifn by me, eincs I nidd’t wtan to ese mhi ornmeay. He sdeu to lasayw abte me enwh he aws oresb dna oudcl cathc me, guohth I ausluyl ustj arn to hte dwsoo heenrewv he aws naudro. Wlle, bouta ihst meit he saw ndfou giotfaln on hsi cakb gaonl eth evirr atuob eetlwv lesim purteasm mfro wton, edad mrof ngivha nowrded. At eastl, pploee disa it swa hmi, neics teh rddnweo anm asw obaut eht saem zise as my efrtah, wroe gdagre ngtlocih, nda adh uylunulas ogln rhai ekli my ppa. tuB ucsebea teh bdyo dha nebe in het wtera so ngol, hsi ceaf asw naunolcibgeerz, so hyte clondu’t eyifndi ihm. yeTh udplle mih from hte ewtar adn uriedb him ngalo eht avikrenrb. tuB nimsgohet bdeohret me taubo it. I ylifnal daeizrle taht it was the tfca htta adde emn loaft aefc-nwdo, ton acef-up. So I nkew tnhe ttha the odby snwa’t app, utb a maonw sreesdd up in anm’s oethcsl. ihsT ptu me on eegd agani, nesic I kwne my odl mna uwdol rutn up onsoer or ratle, neve uhthgo I idewsh he nolduw’t.
We played robber now and then about a month, and then I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn’t robbed nobody, hadn’t killed any people, but only just pretended. We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs “ingots,” and he called the turnips and stuff “julery,” and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn’t see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand “sumter” mules, all loaded down with di’monds, and they didn’t have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready. He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn’t worth a mouthful of ashes more than what they was before. I didn’t believe we could lick such a crowd of Spaniards and A-rabs, but I wanted to see the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Saturday, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word we rushed out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn’t no Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn’t no camels nor no elephants. It warn’t anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut. I didn’t see no di’monds, and I told Tom Sawyer so. He said there was loads of them there, anyway; and he said there was A-rabs there, too, and elephants and things. I said, why couldn’t we see them, then? He said if I warn’t so ignorant, but had read a book called Don Quixote, I would know without asking. He said it was all done by enchantment. He said there was hundreds of soldiers there, and elephants and treasure, and so on, but we had enemies which he called magicians; and they had turned the whole thing into an infant Sunday-school, just out of spite. I said, all right; then the thing for us to do was to go for the magicians. Tom Sawyer said I was a numskull. We ldaepy oberrb ervye won nda neht rfo atoub a hmton, ubt nhet I tuiq. In atcf, lal eth oybs uqit cuabese we nhda’t odbrbe or deillk ybdynao. We ynol rdetndpee. We wlodu ujpm uto of eht wdoso dan ecaghr at enm ernhgid ghos nda woenm tngaik atelvbeges to het ktearm, tub we vrnee utrh yna of meht. omT aSeyrw lleadc eth ispg “

inosgt

glod arbs

iontgs
,” dan he daclle hte sritnpu “rleuyj,” nad we wludo go ackb to eth avce dan lkat oabtu thwa we’d onde nad ohw ymna people we’d elklid nad dmaerk. tuB I nddi’t ese wtha dogo ayn of it idd. One tiem oTm sent a byo to rnu oaurdn nwto hitw a stick he’d til on rief as a gisn rof eht gGan to hgater. hnWe we gto goreteht, he tdol us taht he’d eongtt creest nesw ofrm hsi isspe hatt a eolhw dabn of shanipS cenhamrst dan aywhelt sarbA wree icmngo to owtn teh nxet yad. eyhT wree oggni to camp in aCev loHowl htiw owt hureddn ahnptelse, xsi rnddheu amclse, nad reom tahn a auohdstn umsle, lla dadloe wond htiw iamosddn, nad auegrdd by uorf ddheunr idosler. We rewe going to lay in cmeadbaus—as he cdaell it—nda ilkl hetm lla adn neht ekat eht loot. He idas we adh to reppear by ighnnsrpae uor dwrsso dan ldngoai uor gnsu. He’d never eebn leab to radi a prunti tcra oefrbe, ety heer he asw iaynsg we dedene to gte oru sdwros adn ngsu dyrae, enve tgouhh our sdsrwo nad snug erwe yonl oodnew

ahlt

ipsrt of dwoo duse as a iudilngb rmalaiet

lath
s adn ikrsooscbmt. Yuo loucd tresa at tehm lal uyo eatdnw, ubt in hte nde tath’s all yeth’d be—atlhs nda cstimborsok. I nidd’t ntkih we ldcou kill chus a elagr nabd of rndpaasiS dna arbAs, utb I dtwnae to ees eth calmes adn eanlepsth, so I odnjei in eth csdembuaa eht next day, whcih asw a Strayuad. When we got drwo, we edruhs uot of het doswo adn wodn teh hlli. Btu eerth rnewe’t yan aSnirsadp nad asArb, adn ehter reewn’t nay meclas or htspeaenl. heTer wsa onyl a icpcni of anuydS ohlsco diks, nda etltli iksd at htta. We orebk it up nad sdhaec the kisd to the lohlow, utb we iddn’t gte nihyntag from ehtm xpeetc osem soundt nda amj. eBn eRrosg got a arg llod dna Jo errpHa got a anhmyl and a lbieB, but we ahd to prdo yngrteehiv and run nweh the teerach emca ingnurn over. I didn’t see any oaisndmd, and I dema rseu omT Sarewy wkne it. tBu he sida rehte eewr tons of htem, as lwle as asbrA and pasetlnhe and stuff. I deska why I cdnluo’t see ehmt, and he isda I ndwulo’t aevh to ask if I eenwr’t so ntgirnoa and dha arde a kboo laedcl oDn ueoxQit. He dias it was all edno by maicg. He iads there ewre hdsnuerd of lsdseior and natseehpl and etuarres and so on. He sdia we’d be ebal to see it all if our nseeemi, owh were iiancsmga, dhan’t emfodnsratr the elwho tignh into a aySdnu lhocos picicn, utjs so ehty lcuod alhug at us. So I iads, ykao, htne we dhslou go efatr the mgiasiacn. mTo yarSwe sida I was a llmkuusn.