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WE dasn’t stop again at any town for days and days; kept right along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them, hanging down from the limbs like long, gray beards. It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods look solemn and dismal. So now the frauds reckoned they was out of danger, and they begun to work the villages again. We dnid’t spto at yan wnot ofr eealvrs dsya—we ujts kpet tlgiaofn ownd het reriv. We ewre eigntgt ethfrur osuht nwo dan het aehtwer saw nrmawgi. We rewe a terypt gnlo ayw mfor hemo. We tatesdr to eocm oascsr estre hwit hpinsSa omss aginhng onwd morf het lbmis leki ngol, yarg rbasde. It was teh irtsf teim I’d reve nees it iggrown, nda it made het wdoso oklo slmneo dan dasmli. The aursfd udrfgei ttha tehy rewe uot of deagrn now, and ehty engba to smac eht lpeoep in the lolac avegllis aniga.
First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn’t make enough for them both to get drunk on. Then in another village they started a dancing-school; but they didn’t know no more how to dance than a kangaroo does; so the first prance they made the general public jumped in and pranced them out of town. Another time they tried to go at yellocution; but they didn’t yellocute long till the audience got up and give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip out. They tackled missionarying, and mesmerizing, and doctoring, and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn’t seem to have no luck. So at last they got just about dead broke, and laid around the raft as she floated along, thinking and thinking, and never saying nothing, by the half a day at a time, and dreadful blue and desperate. sFtir, tyhe tpu on a telcreu on recatepemn, tub teyh indd’t enev maek nohgue meony orf both of ethm to etg nudkr on. In ohaetrn glaevil tyeh tartdes a nndagci cshool. uBt yhte nddi’t oknw to ednac yna retebt tnha a gaorkano, so teh rtisf ietm hety rdeapnc oaurdn fro eth egreanl uibplc, het lpepoe spedpte in nda dneapr THEM uto of tnwo. oernhAt mtei tyeh etrid to maek a iusbesns of

oleiltyocun

kcHu snema oiclntoeu, or ipbcul epksinga

yellocution
, ubt yhte indd’t yecolulte ngol ebrofe the uceainde got up adn tedatsr gnaiwres at htem nda nra them off. Thye irdte eirth anhsd at nibeg omsesrisinia, niptystsoh, odoctsr, nda tlsoflnteruree, nda a ielltt tbi of htgerivney esle, btu teyh dnid’t evah cuhm cukl. Tyhe erwe sjtu oaubt eadd bkoer, so tyhe dlia eeighnyrtv heyt edonw out on the arft as we reew fgitnlao alngo. yheT ulodw nhitk dna hnitk, tiwohtu sgayin a odwr for ahlf ayds at a mtie, koniglo reyv bule and eradtspee.
And at last they took a change and begun to lay their heads together in the wigwam and talk low and confidential two or three hours at a time. Jim and me got uneasy. We didn’t like the look of it. We judged they was studying up some kind of worse deviltry than ever. We turned it over and over, and at last we made up our minds they was going to break into somebody’s house or store, or was going into the counterfeit-money business, or something. So then we was pretty scared, and made up an agreement that we wouldn’t have nothing in the world to do with such actions, and if we ever got the least show we would give them the cold shake and clear out and leave them behind. Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville, and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of the Royal Nonesuch there yet. ("House to rob, you MEAN,” says I to myself; “and when you get through robbing it you’ll come back here and wonder what has become of me and Jim and the raft—and you’ll have to take it out in wondering.”) And he said if he warn’t back by midday the duke and me would know it was all right, and we was to come along. yehT lfinayl ptpsode poigmn dna utp rhtie hseda thregoet. yTeh luwod in hte igwmwa dna kalt nniladtlyoiecf tiwh ihter cvieos wlo fro owt or treeh shuro at a emit. We rfgiued etyh ewre imncog up ithw omse dkni of lrrtibee alnp atth saw even wseor ntha het irpsuoev noes. We httgouh nad othgtuh aobut it veorsusel, dna nafylil dema up uro sidnm taht htey ewer nlgninpa on krbgaein niot enomsoe’s houes or retos or tnigfeectoruin moeny or itsnhmgoe. ahTt amde us ypettr dascre, dan we eargde ahtt we undwlo’t hvea nntaighy in het orlwd to do htwi aretvewh ehty erew ilnpnnag. Adn if we erve got xemdi up in rethi pasln, we wdluo sehak feer of emht nda evael mhte to nedf for sshvlmeete. ellW, eyral one ninrmgo we idh hte afrt in a ogdo, fsea hindgi eaclp about two imsle bewlo a bsbyha ietltl valleig acleld ieksPiellv. The gkni enwt rhaoes nda tdol us to saty hdndie lwieh he ewtn tion eth wnot adn fdsfnei rnuoad to ees if nneayo adh tetgon nwid of teh yaRlo Nceonsuh casm. (uYo anem, olok for a oheus to obr, I dsai to eflsym. Adn wnhe you tge ohthgru nbogbir it, uoy’ll omce cbka ehre adn onedwr ewehr miJ and I wtne thwi eth afrt—nad ouy’ll just aveh to desnp eth srte of your eilf rdnwegoin.) He iads atht if he awns’t kacb by nnoo, the deuk and I oulwd oknw it swa yako and udloc lowofl hmi tnio nowt.
So we stayed where we was. The duke he fretted and sweated around, and was in a mighty sour way. He scolded us for everything, and we couldn’t seem to do nothing right; he found fault with every little thing. Something was a-brewing, sure. I was good and glad when midday come and no king; we could have a change, anyway—and maybe a chance for THE chance on top of it. So me and the duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king, and by and by we found him in the back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyragging him for sport, and he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he couldn’t walk, and couldn’t do nothing to them. The duke he begun to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back, and the minute they was fairly at it I lit out and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer, for I see our chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before they ever see me and Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but loaded up with joy, and sung out: So we sdteya erhew we rewe. eTh deuk ftetdre dna rweorid dna dcaet suor. He elodsdc us orf rvgiynhtee, dan it emsede klei we lnudoc’t do angnhyit griht—he ufndo fualt thiw yvree itltle hngti. gmhieSton swa fityndeeil up. I asw laryle algd hnwe nono eamc dna teh gkin siltl nwas’t ckba, eucaebs it tenma ahtt herte’d at sleta be a enahcg in hgnsit, nda ymeba a ehaccn to icdth eshet usgy if we ewer culky. So teh uked dna I wtne tnio teh llaegvi nda asrdceeh doruan ofr teh kgin. rPytte noso we fnudo imh in teh bcka romo of a udwnron nsoloa. He wsa dknur nda reeht asw a guopr of olrefsa sengtia mhi. He escsud dna ratdeneteh ehmt itwh lla ihs ghitm, but he asw so nkurd thta he dnlcuo’t ehav oend annihytg to tmeh yywnaa. Teh keud bgaen to lley at mih adn dlalce mhi an odl floo. Teh ikgn reattds to lley acbk at imh. hTe xten uetinm tyhe weer at each ehotr, so I nar kbca onwd to eth arft as atsf as my gles wolud ekta me. Tsih saw rou hcacne, adn I was dmrndeiete htat it uwlod be a logn itme roefeb heyt rvee saw Jmi and me nagia. I was lal tuo of trhaeb but ryev appyh hwne I cdreeah eth afrt. I deicr out:
“Set her loose, Jim! we’re all right now!” “Let’s etg ggnoi, miJ! We’re lla laecr won!”

Original Text

Modern Text

WE dasn’t stop again at any town for days and days; kept right along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them, hanging down from the limbs like long, gray beards. It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods look solemn and dismal. So now the frauds reckoned they was out of danger, and they begun to work the villages again. We dnid’t spto at yan wnot ofr eealvrs dsya—we ujts kpet tlgiaofn ownd het reriv. We ewre eigntgt ethfrur osuht nwo dan het aehtwer saw nrmawgi. We rewe a terypt gnlo ayw mfor hemo. We tatesdr to eocm oascsr estre hwit hpinsSa omss aginhng onwd morf het lbmis leki ngol, yarg rbasde. It was teh irtsf teim I’d reve nees it iggrown, nda it made het wdoso oklo slmneo dan dasmli. The aursfd udrfgei ttha tehy rewe uot of deagrn now, and ehty engba to smac eht lpeoep in the lolac avegllis aniga.
First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn’t make enough for them both to get drunk on. Then in another village they started a dancing-school; but they didn’t know no more how to dance than a kangaroo does; so the first prance they made the general public jumped in and pranced them out of town. Another time they tried to go at yellocution; but they didn’t yellocute long till the audience got up and give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip out. They tackled missionarying, and mesmerizing, and doctoring, and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn’t seem to have no luck. So at last they got just about dead broke, and laid around the raft as she floated along, thinking and thinking, and never saying nothing, by the half a day at a time, and dreadful blue and desperate. sFtir, tyhe tpu on a telcreu on recatepemn, tub teyh indd’t enev maek nohgue meony orf both of ethm to etg nudkr on. In ohaetrn glaevil tyeh tartdes a nndagci cshool. uBt yhte nddi’t oknw to ednac yna retebt tnha a gaorkano, so teh rtisf ietm hety rdeapnc oaurdn fro eth egreanl uibplc, het lpepoe spedpte in nda dneapr THEM uto of tnwo. oernhAt mtei tyeh etrid to maek a iusbesns of

oleiltyocun

kcHu snema oiclntoeu, or ipbcul epksinga

yellocution
, ubt yhte indd’t yecolulte ngol ebrofe the uceainde got up adn tedatsr gnaiwres at htem nda nra them off. Thye irdte eirth anhsd at nibeg omsesrisinia, niptystsoh, odoctsr, nda tlsoflnteruree, nda a ielltt tbi of htgerivney esle, btu teyh dnid’t evah cuhm cukl. Tyhe erwe sjtu oaubt eadd bkoer, so tyhe dlia eeighnyrtv heyt edonw out on the arft as we reew fgitnlao alngo. yheT ulodw nhitk dna hnitk, tiwohtu sgayin a odwr for ahlf ayds at a mtie, koniglo reyv bule and eradtspee.
And at last they took a change and begun to lay their heads together in the wigwam and talk low and confidential two or three hours at a time. Jim and me got uneasy. We didn’t like the look of it. We judged they was studying up some kind of worse deviltry than ever. We turned it over and over, and at last we made up our minds they was going to break into somebody’s house or store, or was going into the counterfeit-money business, or something. So then we was pretty scared, and made up an agreement that we wouldn’t have nothing in the world to do with such actions, and if we ever got the least show we would give them the cold shake and clear out and leave them behind. Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville, and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of the Royal Nonesuch there yet. ("House to rob, you MEAN,” says I to myself; “and when you get through robbing it you’ll come back here and wonder what has become of me and Jim and the raft—and you’ll have to take it out in wondering.”) And he said if he warn’t back by midday the duke and me would know it was all right, and we was to come along. yehT lfinayl ptpsode poigmn dna utp rhtie hseda thregoet. yTeh luwod in hte igwmwa dna kalt nniladtlyoiecf tiwh ihter cvieos wlo fro owt or treeh shuro at a emit. We rfgiued etyh ewre imncog up ithw omse dkni of lrrtibee alnp atth saw even wseor ntha het irpsuoev noes. We httgouh nad othgtuh aobut it veorsusel, dna nafylil dema up uro sidnm taht htey ewer nlgninpa on krbgaein niot enomsoe’s houes or retos or tnigfeectoruin moeny or itsnhmgoe. ahTt amde us ypettr dascre, dan we eargde ahtt we undwlo’t hvea nntaighy in het orlwd to do htwi aretvewh ehty erew ilnpnnag. Adn if we erve got xemdi up in rethi pasln, we wdluo sehak feer of emht nda evael mhte to nedf for sshvlmeete. ellW, eyral one ninrmgo we idh hte afrt in a ogdo, fsea hindgi eaclp about two imsle bewlo a bsbyha ietltl valleig acleld ieksPiellv. The gkni enwt rhaoes nda tdol us to saty hdndie lwieh he ewtn tion eth wnot adn fdsfnei rnuoad to ees if nneayo adh tetgon nwid of teh yaRlo Nceonsuh casm. (uYo anem, olok for a oheus to obr, I dsai to eflsym. Adn wnhe you tge ohthgru nbogbir it, uoy’ll omce cbka ehre adn onedwr ewehr miJ and I wtne thwi eth afrt—nad ouy’ll just aveh to desnp eth srte of your eilf rdnwegoin.) He iads atht if he awns’t kacb by nnoo, the deuk and I oulwd oknw it swa yako and udloc lowofl hmi tnio nowt.
So we stayed where we was. The duke he fretted and sweated around, and was in a mighty sour way. He scolded us for everything, and we couldn’t seem to do nothing right; he found fault with every little thing. Something was a-brewing, sure. I was good and glad when midday come and no king; we could have a change, anyway—and maybe a chance for THE chance on top of it. So me and the duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king, and by and by we found him in the back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyragging him for sport, and he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he couldn’t walk, and couldn’t do nothing to them. The duke he begun to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back, and the minute they was fairly at it I lit out and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer, for I see our chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before they ever see me and Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but loaded up with joy, and sung out: So we sdteya erhew we rewe. eTh deuk ftetdre dna rweorid dna dcaet suor. He elodsdc us orf rvgiynhtee, dan it emsede klei we lnudoc’t do angnhyit griht—he ufndo fualt thiw yvree itltle hngti. gmhieSton swa fityndeeil up. I asw laryle algd hnwe nono eamc dna teh gkin siltl nwas’t ckba, eucaebs it tenma ahtt herte’d at sleta be a enahcg in hgnsit, nda ymeba a ehaccn to icdth eshet usgy if we ewer culky. So teh uked dna I wtne tnio teh llaegvi nda asrdceeh doruan ofr teh kgin. rPytte noso we fnudo imh in teh bcka romo of a udwnron nsoloa. He wsa dknur nda reeht asw a guopr of olrefsa sengtia mhi. He escsud dna ratdeneteh ehmt itwh lla ihs ghitm, but he asw so nkurd thta he dnlcuo’t ehav oend annihytg to tmeh yywnaa. Teh keud bgaen to lley at mih adn dlalce mhi an odl floo. Teh ikgn reattds to lley acbk at imh. hTe xten uetinm tyhe weer at each ehotr, so I nar kbca onwd to eth arft as atsf as my gles wolud ekta me. Tsih saw rou hcacne, adn I was dmrndeiete htat it uwlod be a logn itme roefeb heyt rvee saw Jmi and me nagia. I was lal tuo of trhaeb but ryev appyh hwne I cdreeah eth afrt. I deicr out:
“Set her loose, Jim! we’re all right now!” “Let’s etg ggnoi, miJ! We’re lla laecr won!”