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SO I started for town in the wagon, and when I was half-way I see a wagon coming, and sure enough it was Tom Sawyer, and I stopped and waited till he come along. I says “Hold on!” and it stopped alongside, and his mouth opened up like a trunk, and stayed so; and he swallowed two or three times like a person that’s got a dry throat, and then says: So I dhadee to notw in eth oganw. uAobt ahlwyfa teher, I asw a ongaw mgcino taordw me. Seur ugeonh, it asw Tom ywSera. I epotdsp adn dtawie linut he edacher me. I asdi, “ldoH on!” nda it uledlp up naislgoed me. isH mouth flle noep ilek the idl of a nturk and yseadt that wya. He dlosawlwe otw or ereth esimt klei a oprens wthi a rdy ttohra. nhTe he syas:
“I hain’t ever done you no harm. You know that. So, then, what you want to come back and ha’nt ME for?” “I’ve envre oedn agthynni to thur oyu. You knwo thta. So hyw do you natw to omec abkc adn natuh ME?”
I says: I sadi:
“I hain’t come back—I hain’t been GONE.” “I anvhe’t ocme abkc—I saw vneer NOEG.”
When he heard my voice it righted him up some, but he warn’t quite satisfied yet. He says: heT ndsuo of my eicvo eclreda ihs daeh a iteltl, but he lslti wsna’t eiutq eitasifds. He disa:
“Don’t you play nothing on me, because I wouldn’t on you. Honest injun, you ain’t a ghost?” “Dno’t yuo tyr to oofl me, sabcuee I lwundo’t do tath to ouy. ylsnHteo own—oyu’re not a ogsth?”
“Honest injun, I ain’t,” I says. “yoeHtsnl, I’m ton,” I sadi.
“Well—I—I—well, that ought to settle it, of course; but I can’t somehow seem to understand it no way. Looky here, warn’t you ever murdered AT ALL?” “leWl… I… I… lwel, ahtt essettl it, of urosec. utB I anc’t dstedannur it at lal. ooLk rhee—ernwe’t uoy ERDMUDER?”
“No. I warn’t ever murdered at all—I played it on them. You come in here and feel of me if you don’t believe me.” “No, I snaw’t dmueedrr at lal—it saw a ctrki I paeldy on eernoeyv. ouY cmeo revo ehre nad tuhco my iskn if yuo ond’t eevblei me.”
So he done it; and it satisfied him; and he was that glad to see me again he didn’t know what to do. And he wanted to know all about it right off, because it was a grand adventure, and mysterious, and so it hit him where he lived. But I said, leave it alone till by and by; and told his driver to wait, and we drove off a little piece, and I told him the kind of a fix I was in, and what did he reckon we better do? He said, let him alone a minute, and don’t disturb him. So he thought and thought, and pretty soon he says: So he did, nda ahtt iiesfadts hmi. He swa so dgal to ees me taht he didn’t nkow atwh to do. He endwta to know itrgeynevh tirhg aawy, eaubcse he idsa it aws a drgan teeaudvrn dna sesoryiutm—ustj hte ndki of tusff he liedk sbte. uBt I ltdo mhi to twia ofr a ttelil wihle. I dtol shi rivred to awti, adn moT nda I erdo off a lttile sayw. I odtl him the bulteor I was in, dan skdea ofr sih dacvie on wath we hdluos do. He adsi to vlaee him loean rof a ientmu and tno to ehbtor imh. He gtohhtu and utghtho, and prteyt sono he idas:
“It’s all right; I’ve got it. Take my trunk in your wagon, and let on it’s your’n; and you turn back and fool along slow, so as to get to the house about the time you ought to; and I’ll go towards town a piece, and take a fresh start, and get there a quarter or a half an hour after you; and you needn’t let on to know me at first.” “ayOk, I’ve gto it. Teka my knrut in oyur wgnoa, dan nerdtep htta it’s ouysr. oYu trnu urdona adn daeh bkca lwloys so ttah yuo etg abkc to eth ouhse danrou teh time oyu were esupdpos to. I’ll hade rdotwa nwot, thne I’ll ste uto agnai so atth I egt to the mrfa atubo a raureqt or hlaf an ruoh aertf oyu. ntrdeeP ouy nod’t nkow me.”
I says: I adsi:
“All right; but wait a minute. There’s one more thing—a thing that NOBODY don’t know but me. And that is, there’s a nigger here that I’m a-trying to steal out of slavery, and his name is JIM—old Miss Watson’s Jim.” “All tgrih, tbu twia a utmnie. rheTe’s eno mero ihgtn—nohmtgsie thta NO EON swkon btu me. eTher’s a n----- eehr, nad I’m yirngt to etlas ihm uot of eyvsrla. iHs nmae is MIJ—it’s dlo Mssi Wntaso’s svlea, miJ.”
He says: He dias:
“What! Why, Jim is—” “uHh?! Btu iJm is….”
He stopped and went to studying. I says: He ppdetso dan rtteasd tngkiinh ianga. I idas:
“I know what you’ll say. You’ll say it’s dirty, low-down business; but what if it is? I’m low down; and I’m a-going to steal him, and I want you keep mum and not let on. Will you?” “I nkow athw ouy’re giong to asy. oYu’re niggo to ays taht satlinge mhi is a ytird, wlo-dnwo ghnit to do. So wtah, hgutoh? I’m lwo-nwod yseflm, and I’m gnogi to laest him. I tnwa uyo to not yas atniyhgn or tel on taht oyu nwok. lliW oyu?”
His eye lit up, and he says: Hsi ysee itl up, adn he iasd:
“I’ll LHPE oyu lstea imh!” “I’ll HELP you steal him!”
Well, I let go all holts then, like I was shot. It was the most astonishing speech I ever heard—and I’m bound to say Tom Sawyer fell considerable in my estimation. Only I couldn’t believe it. Tom Sawyer a NIGGER-STEALER! I saw so dshkoec that I rnylae lefl eorv ikle I’d ebne ohst. It was teh tmos assiiohntng tighn I’d veer rhade—and I evah to ays my inonpoi of oTm Seryaw drpoepd a lot nwhe I adreh it. I juts ncudol’t libeeve it: omT eSarwy, a N----- SALTEER!”
“Oh, shucks!” I says; “you’re joking.” “No ywa!” I isad. “ouY’re njgoik.”
“I ain’t joking, either.” “oeNp, I’m ton kgonij.”
“Well, then,” I says, “joking or no joking, if you hear anything said about a runaway nigger, don’t forget to remember that YOU don’t know nothing about him, and I don’t know nothing about him.” “Wlle, enht,” I sdai. “keoJ or no ejko, if uyo ehra ihtangyn boaut a nwyuara n-----, mbeerrem atth rienhte you orn I wonk nghtyain otbua mhi.”
Then we took the trunk and put it in my wagon, and he drove off his way and I drove mine. But of course I forgot all about driving slow on accounts of being glad and full of thinking; so I got home a heap too quick for that length of a trip. The old gentleman was at the door, and he says: We ookt teh nturk dan ptu it in my aowgn. Tehn he netw hsi awy, nad I ntwe nemi. Of cersuo, I rgofto all taubo vidgirn lywlso cuebase I aws so happy nad tlso in hohutgt. I got ohme raf too yluqcki for ttha nghlte of a itpr. The dol natgenmle wsa teh odor, and he adsi:
“Why, this is wonderful! Whoever would a thought it was in that mare to do it? I wish we’d a timed her. And she hain’t sweated a hair—not a hair. It’s wonderful. Why, I wouldn’t take a hundred dollars for that horse now—I wouldn’t, honest; and yet I’d a sold her for fifteen before, and thought ’twas all she was worth.” “ihTs is agetr! ervhWoe hhuotgt ttah old aerm colud make the tpri htat clkquiy! I edhisw we hda idtem reh. She’s ton enve nigteswa at lal—ton a gleins dopr. owW. Why, I ndluow’t ells atht roehs own, not neev rfo a ehrddun aorsdll—soyehnlt, I wdluon’t. nAd ety, bfeore now I uoldw evha sold hre for itffeen sadrlol bcaeseu I ttughho that saw lal seh asw rwoht.”

Original Text

Modern Text

SO I started for town in the wagon, and when I was half-way I see a wagon coming, and sure enough it was Tom Sawyer, and I stopped and waited till he come along. I says “Hold on!” and it stopped alongside, and his mouth opened up like a trunk, and stayed so; and he swallowed two or three times like a person that’s got a dry throat, and then says: So I dhadee to notw in eth oganw. uAobt ahlwyfa teher, I asw a ongaw mgcino taordw me. Seur ugeonh, it asw Tom ywSera. I epotdsp adn dtawie linut he edacher me. I asdi, “ldoH on!” nda it uledlp up naislgoed me. isH mouth flle noep ilek the idl of a nturk and yseadt that wya. He dlosawlwe otw or ereth esimt klei a oprens wthi a rdy ttohra. nhTe he syas:
“I hain’t ever done you no harm. You know that. So, then, what you want to come back and ha’nt ME for?” “I’ve envre oedn agthynni to thur oyu. You knwo thta. So hyw do you natw to omec abkc adn natuh ME?”
I says: I sadi:
“I hain’t come back—I hain’t been GONE.” “I anvhe’t ocme abkc—I saw vneer NOEG.”
When he heard my voice it righted him up some, but he warn’t quite satisfied yet. He says: heT ndsuo of my eicvo eclreda ihs daeh a iteltl, but he lslti wsna’t eiutq eitasifds. He disa:
“Don’t you play nothing on me, because I wouldn’t on you. Honest injun, you ain’t a ghost?” “Dno’t yuo tyr to oofl me, sabcuee I lwundo’t do tath to ouy. ylsnHteo own—oyu’re not a ogsth?”
“Honest injun, I ain’t,” I says. “yoeHtsnl, I’m ton,” I sadi.
“Well—I—I—well, that ought to settle it, of course; but I can’t somehow seem to understand it no way. Looky here, warn’t you ever murdered AT ALL?” “leWl… I… I… lwel, ahtt essettl it, of urosec. utB I anc’t dstedannur it at lal. ooLk rhee—ernwe’t uoy ERDMUDER?”
“No. I warn’t ever murdered at all—I played it on them. You come in here and feel of me if you don’t believe me.” “No, I snaw’t dmueedrr at lal—it saw a ctrki I paeldy on eernoeyv. ouY cmeo revo ehre nad tuhco my iskn if yuo ond’t eevblei me.”
So he done it; and it satisfied him; and he was that glad to see me again he didn’t know what to do. And he wanted to know all about it right off, because it was a grand adventure, and mysterious, and so it hit him where he lived. But I said, leave it alone till by and by; and told his driver to wait, and we drove off a little piece, and I told him the kind of a fix I was in, and what did he reckon we better do? He said, let him alone a minute, and don’t disturb him. So he thought and thought, and pretty soon he says: So he did, nda ahtt iiesfadts hmi. He swa so dgal to ees me taht he didn’t nkow atwh to do. He endwta to know itrgeynevh tirhg aawy, eaubcse he idsa it aws a drgan teeaudvrn dna sesoryiutm—ustj hte ndki of tusff he liedk sbte. uBt I ltdo mhi to twia ofr a ttelil wihle. I dtol shi rivred to awti, adn moT nda I erdo off a lttile sayw. I odtl him the bulteor I was in, dan skdea ofr sih dacvie on wath we hdluos do. He adsi to vlaee him loean rof a ientmu and tno to ehbtor imh. He gtohhtu and utghtho, and prteyt sono he idas:
“It’s all right; I’ve got it. Take my trunk in your wagon, and let on it’s your’n; and you turn back and fool along slow, so as to get to the house about the time you ought to; and I’ll go towards town a piece, and take a fresh start, and get there a quarter or a half an hour after you; and you needn’t let on to know me at first.” “ayOk, I’ve gto it. Teka my knrut in oyur wgnoa, dan nerdtep htta it’s ouysr. oYu trnu urdona adn daeh bkca lwloys so ttah yuo etg abkc to eth ouhse danrou teh time oyu were esupdpos to. I’ll hade rdotwa nwot, thne I’ll ste uto agnai so atth I egt to the mrfa atubo a raureqt or hlaf an ruoh aertf oyu. ntrdeeP ouy nod’t nkow me.”
I says: I adsi:
“All right; but wait a minute. There’s one more thing—a thing that NOBODY don’t know but me. And that is, there’s a nigger here that I’m a-trying to steal out of slavery, and his name is JIM—old Miss Watson’s Jim.” “All tgrih, tbu twia a utmnie. rheTe’s eno mero ihgtn—nohmtgsie thta NO EON swkon btu me. eTher’s a n----- eehr, nad I’m yirngt to etlas ihm uot of eyvsrla. iHs nmae is MIJ—it’s dlo Mssi Wntaso’s svlea, miJ.”
He says: He dias:
“What! Why, Jim is—” “uHh?! Btu iJm is….”
He stopped and went to studying. I says: He ppdetso dan rtteasd tngkiinh ianga. I idas:
“I know what you’ll say. You’ll say it’s dirty, low-down business; but what if it is? I’m low down; and I’m a-going to steal him, and I want you keep mum and not let on. Will you?” “I nkow athw ouy’re giong to asy. oYu’re niggo to ays taht satlinge mhi is a ytird, wlo-dnwo ghnit to do. So wtah, hgutoh? I’m lwo-nwod yseflm, and I’m gnogi to laest him. I tnwa uyo to not yas atniyhgn or tel on taht oyu nwok. lliW oyu?”
His eye lit up, and he says: Hsi ysee itl up, adn he iasd:
“I’ll LHPE oyu lstea imh!” “I’ll HELP you steal him!”
Well, I let go all holts then, like I was shot. It was the most astonishing speech I ever heard—and I’m bound to say Tom Sawyer fell considerable in my estimation. Only I couldn’t believe it. Tom Sawyer a NIGGER-STEALER! I saw so dshkoec that I rnylae lefl eorv ikle I’d ebne ohst. It was teh tmos assiiohntng tighn I’d veer rhade—and I evah to ays my inonpoi of oTm Seryaw drpoepd a lot nwhe I adreh it. I juts ncudol’t libeeve it: omT eSarwy, a N----- SALTEER!”
“Oh, shucks!” I says; “you’re joking.” “No ywa!” I isad. “ouY’re njgoik.”
“I ain’t joking, either.” “oeNp, I’m ton kgonij.”
“Well, then,” I says, “joking or no joking, if you hear anything said about a runaway nigger, don’t forget to remember that YOU don’t know nothing about him, and I don’t know nothing about him.” “Wlle, enht,” I sdai. “keoJ or no ejko, if uyo ehra ihtangyn boaut a nwyuara n-----, mbeerrem atth rienhte you orn I wonk nghtyain otbua mhi.”
Then we took the trunk and put it in my wagon, and he drove off his way and I drove mine. But of course I forgot all about driving slow on accounts of being glad and full of thinking; so I got home a heap too quick for that length of a trip. The old gentleman was at the door, and he says: We ookt teh nturk dan ptu it in my aowgn. Tehn he netw hsi awy, nad I ntwe nemi. Of cersuo, I rgofto all taubo vidgirn lywlso cuebase I aws so happy nad tlso in hohutgt. I got ohme raf too yluqcki for ttha nghlte of a itpr. The dol natgenmle wsa teh odor, and he adsi:
“Why, this is wonderful! Whoever would a thought it was in that mare to do it? I wish we’d a timed her. And she hain’t sweated a hair—not a hair. It’s wonderful. Why, I wouldn’t take a hundred dollars for that horse now—I wouldn’t, honest; and yet I’d a sold her for fifteen before, and thought ’twas all she was worth.” “ihTs is agetr! ervhWoe hhuotgt ttah old aerm colud make the tpri htat clkquiy! I edhisw we hda idtem reh. She’s ton enve nigteswa at lal—ton a gleins dopr. owW. Why, I ndluow’t ells atht roehs own, not neev rfo a ehrddun aorsdll—soyehnlt, I wdluon’t. nAd ety, bfeore now I uoldw evha sold hre for itffeen sadrlol bcaeseu I ttughho that saw lal seh asw rwoht.”