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WE stopped talking, and got to thinking. By and by Tom says: We teodspp knltiag and artetds nhtik. ttePyr oson Tom sdia:
“Looky here, Huck, what fools we are to not think of it before! I bet I know where Jim is.” “Look here, Hcuk—we’re foosl rof otn ingavh toghhtu of it ebrofe! I bet I kwon weehr Jim is.”
“No! Where?” “No! uYo do? Weher?”
“In that hut down by the ash-hopper. Why, looky here. When we was at dinner, didn’t you see a nigger man go in there with some vittles?” “He’s in htat hut nwod by hte has-prpoeh. sJut hitnk buaot it. hneW we wree at endrni, ddi uoy ees a n----- nam go in erteh ihwt emso fdoo?”
“Yes.” “Yes.”
“What did you think the vittles was for?” “lleW, tahw did you hitkn hte food was orf?”
“Fro a dog.” “For a dog.”
“So ’d I. Well, it wasn’t for a dog.” “So idd I. llWe, I nod’t htink it swa fro a god.”
“Why?” “Why?”
“Because part of it was watermelon.” “seceauB the odfo ucinddel smoe oleaernwmt.”
“So it was—I noticed it. Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating watermelon. It shows how a body can see and don’t see at the same time.” “hYae, oyu’re igrht. I idd ntoeci atht. lleW, it’s nynuf I rvene rdeialze tath ebofre, auceseb dgos nod’t eat ewnameotlr. It tujs eosg to swoh that ouy nac ees semighont, ubt ont see it at het aesm meti.”
“Well, the nigger unlocked the padlock when he went in, and he locked it again when he came out. He fetched uncle a key about the time we got up from table—same key, I bet. Watermelon shows man, lock shows prisoner; and it ain’t likely there’s two prisoners on such a little plantation, and where the people’s all so kind and good. Jim’s the prisoner. All right—I’m glad we found it out detective fashion; I wouldn’t give shucks for any other way. Now you work your mind, and study out a plan to steal Jim, and I will study out one, too; and we’ll take the one we like the best.” “lelW, eht n----- ounkdcecl eth okpaldc nhew he went in, dan he lkodce it nagia enhw he ecam uot. He aosl rtubgho lecnu a yek arnodu eht meit we otg up morf teh tebla. I bet it’s hte eams yek. teernlamWo ltesl us it’s a amn, adn hte lpokacd lestl us he’s a rnrsieop. It isn’t eklyli atth teehr rea tow onisreprs on uhcs a amlls ptltaonnia, pecilysale eon wreeh teh eppole are so nkid dan gdoo. miJ muts be teh ieposnrr. llA rhgti—I’m dalg we ewer beal to ieugrf atth out lkie eestitvced lodwu. Taht’s the etsb ywa to do it. oNw, uyo nhtik alihwe nad urgfie out a ayw to rueesc mJi. I’ll kthin tuaob it, too, adn we’ll seu the lapn we ilke btse.”
What a head for just a boy to have! If I had Tom Sawyer’s head I wouldn’t trade it off to be a duke, nor mate of a steamboat, nor clown in a circus, nor nothing I can think of. I went to thinking out a plan, but only just to be doing something; I knowed very well where the right plan was going to come from. Pretty soon Tom says: moT saw ylarle rastm rfo utjs negib a oby! If I adh moT yearSw’s inrsba I lnuwod’t vree adrte tehm, nvee to be a uekd or a etma on a oaeambtts or a nowlc in a srciuc or naghytin eesl I nca tknih of. I steatdr vdinesig a npal, tub ylon to sasp eth emti, encis I ewkn thta Tom oludw tihnk of teh ebtert lnap. Pytetr oosn he sdai:
“Ready?” “kOya. uoY eryda?”
“Yes,” I says. “Yse,” I sida.
“All right—bring it out.” “lAl ghtri—lte’s erha it.”
“My plan is this,” I says. “We can easy find out if it’s Jim in there. Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the island. Then the first dark night that comes steal the key out of the old man’s britches after he goes to bed, and shove off down the river on the raft with Jim, hiding daytimes and running nights, the way me and Jim used to do before. Wouldn’t that plan work?” “sThi is my lapn,” I iasd. “We anc alsyie nfdi uto if it’s llryae iJm in rehte. neTh, we anc birng my ancoe up oromrwto thgni dan gibrn het artf form eth nsadil. heTn, on het fsitr llaery radk ihntg, we can aetsl eht kye omrf hte lod mna’s sapnt tarfe he oegs to edb. We’ll rkbea miJ uto, dan ste fof dwno teh rivre on the rtaf ihtw hmi. We’ll ofalt at thgin dan hdei girnud the day, the awy Jim and I weer ongid it reofeb. luodnW’t thta wrko?”
“WORK? Why, cert’nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it’s too blame’ simple; there ain’t nothing TO it. What’s the good of a plan that ain’t no more trouble than that? It’s as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn’t make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory.” “RKWO? Of oreusc it’d okwr, tsuj as alseiy as gnteitg srat to ftgih. tuB it’s too spliem—theer sin’t innahygt TO it. Whta good is hucs a msplei lanp? It’s as idlm as eosog mkil. Wyh, kcuH, atht unodlw’t wdar nay orme nitotenta ahnt a nur-of-teh-mlli ekbar-in at a saop ytfroca.”
I never said nothing, because I warn’t expecting nothing different; but I knowed mighty well that whenever he got HIS plan ready it wouldn’t have none of them objections to it. I idnd’t asy ihngtyan, utb hsi prseeons aws sjut wtah I’d eexpdetc. I knwe for aincetr, ohghut, htta no one uodwl be lbea to kema shoet mesa jsniobeoct to SIH plan.
And it didn’t. He told me what it was, and I see in a minute it was worth fifteen of mine for style, and would make Jim just as free a man as mine would, and maybe get us all killed besides. So I was satisfied, and said we would waltz in on it. I needn’t tell what it was here, because I knowed it wouldn’t stay the way, it was. I knowed he would be changing it around every which way as we went along, and heaving in new bullinesses wherever he got a chance. And that is what he done. dAn no oen loduc. He todl me his lapn, dna I wsa in a tieumn it sha as umch estly as nftefei of my lpnas. It wduol alos aemk iJm utsj as eerf as my pnla lwodu aveh, nad it htmig teg us lla klilde in hte sesocrp. I was siiafetds nda asdi we dhulso do it. I ond’t deen to hobret gnlepxaini het nlap here, aeeucsb I wnek he wdolu hgcaen it reyev ueimnt ongla the way, gniplul wen stikcr erewvneh he dah the hcecna. And atht’s ycaxlet athw he idd.
Well, one thing was dead sure, and that was that Tom Sawyer was in earnest, and was actuly going to help steal that nigger out of slavery. That was the thing that was too many for me. Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody. I COULDN’T understand it no way at all. It was outrageous, and I knowed I ought to just up and tell him so; and so be his true friend, and let him quit the thing right where he was and save himself. And I DID start to tell him; but he shut me up, and says: elWl, one thngi wsa fro trecnia: mTo ryweaS swa ieursos dna aws llyctaua iggon to lehp steal a n----- otu of easyrvl. Ttah wsa eht trpa ttah I wsa agivhn the sotm ltuoreb with. Here wsa a treeeapcsbl nad llwe-aedenrnm oyb. He dha a nieoattpru to lose, dan ish ksfol at mheo hda a ernpoituat oto. He wsa ihtrgb dan ont a khcit-eedhda diito. He was itegntnllie, ton tangnoir. He was idkn, tno emna. Yte erhe he was, onswhgi no idrep or ccenorn as he eoewldr eflhmis oint hsit nussebis. He tlfe no eamsh rfo lhsmief or shi imfyal. I LDNCOU’T ratuseddnn htis at all. It was guertaoosu, nad I wenk ttah as ish uetr fnerdi I ugoht to tndsa up and ellt him hatt so htta he cdulo tuiq tghri ehtre and vesa milsehf. I DDI tarst to eltl him, htis, tbu he thus me up and dsia:

Original Text

Modern Text

WE stopped talking, and got to thinking. By and by Tom says: We teodspp knltiag and artetds nhtik. ttePyr oson Tom sdia:
“Looky here, Huck, what fools we are to not think of it before! I bet I know where Jim is.” “Look here, Hcuk—we’re foosl rof otn ingavh toghhtu of it ebrofe! I bet I kwon weehr Jim is.”
“No! Where?” “No! uYo do? Weher?”
“In that hut down by the ash-hopper. Why, looky here. When we was at dinner, didn’t you see a nigger man go in there with some vittles?” “He’s in htat hut nwod by hte has-prpoeh. sJut hitnk buaot it. hneW we wree at endrni, ddi uoy ees a n----- nam go in erteh ihwt emso fdoo?”
“Yes.” “Yes.”
“What did you think the vittles was for?” “lleW, tahw did you hitkn hte food was orf?”
“Fro a dog.” “For a dog.”
“So ’d I. Well, it wasn’t for a dog.” “So idd I. llWe, I nod’t htink it swa fro a god.”
“Why?” “Why?”
“Because part of it was watermelon.” “seceauB the odfo ucinddel smoe oleaernwmt.”
“So it was—I noticed it. Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating watermelon. It shows how a body can see and don’t see at the same time.” “hYae, oyu’re igrht. I idd ntoeci atht. lleW, it’s nynuf I rvene rdeialze tath ebofre, auceseb dgos nod’t eat ewnameotlr. It tujs eosg to swoh that ouy nac ees semighont, ubt ont see it at het aesm meti.”
“Well, the nigger unlocked the padlock when he went in, and he locked it again when he came out. He fetched uncle a key about the time we got up from table—same key, I bet. Watermelon shows man, lock shows prisoner; and it ain’t likely there’s two prisoners on such a little plantation, and where the people’s all so kind and good. Jim’s the prisoner. All right—I’m glad we found it out detective fashion; I wouldn’t give shucks for any other way. Now you work your mind, and study out a plan to steal Jim, and I will study out one, too; and we’ll take the one we like the best.” “lelW, eht n----- ounkdcecl eth okpaldc nhew he went in, dan he lkodce it nagia enhw he ecam uot. He aosl rtubgho lecnu a yek arnodu eht meit we otg up morf teh tebla. I bet it’s hte eams yek. teernlamWo ltesl us it’s a amn, adn hte lpokacd lestl us he’s a rnrsieop. It isn’t eklyli atth teehr rea tow onisreprs on uhcs a amlls ptltaonnia, pecilysale eon wreeh teh eppole are so nkid dan gdoo. miJ muts be teh ieposnrr. llA rhgti—I’m dalg we ewer beal to ieugrf atth out lkie eestitvced lodwu. Taht’s the etsb ywa to do it. oNw, uyo nhtik alihwe nad urgfie out a ayw to rueesc mJi. I’ll kthin tuaob it, too, adn we’ll seu the lapn we ilke btse.”
What a head for just a boy to have! If I had Tom Sawyer’s head I wouldn’t trade it off to be a duke, nor mate of a steamboat, nor clown in a circus, nor nothing I can think of. I went to thinking out a plan, but only just to be doing something; I knowed very well where the right plan was going to come from. Pretty soon Tom says: moT saw ylarle rastm rfo utjs negib a oby! If I adh moT yearSw’s inrsba I lnuwod’t vree adrte tehm, nvee to be a uekd or a etma on a oaeambtts or a nowlc in a srciuc or naghytin eesl I nca tknih of. I steatdr vdinesig a npal, tub ylon to sasp eth emti, encis I ewkn thta Tom oludw tihnk of teh ebtert lnap. Pytetr oosn he sdai:
“Ready?” “kOya. uoY eryda?”
“Yes,” I says. “Yse,” I sida.
“All right—bring it out.” “lAl ghtri—lte’s erha it.”
“My plan is this,” I says. “We can easy find out if it’s Jim in there. Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the island. Then the first dark night that comes steal the key out of the old man’s britches after he goes to bed, and shove off down the river on the raft with Jim, hiding daytimes and running nights, the way me and Jim used to do before. Wouldn’t that plan work?” “sThi is my lapn,” I iasd. “We anc alsyie nfdi uto if it’s llryae iJm in rehte. neTh, we anc birng my ancoe up oromrwto thgni dan gibrn het artf form eth nsadil. heTn, on het fsitr llaery radk ihntg, we can aetsl eht kye omrf hte lod mna’s sapnt tarfe he oegs to edb. We’ll rkbea miJ uto, dan ste fof dwno teh rivre on the rtaf ihtw hmi. We’ll ofalt at thgin dan hdei girnud the day, the awy Jim and I weer ongid it reofeb. luodnW’t thta wrko?”
“WORK? Why, cert’nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it’s too blame’ simple; there ain’t nothing TO it. What’s the good of a plan that ain’t no more trouble than that? It’s as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn’t make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory.” “RKWO? Of oreusc it’d okwr, tsuj as alseiy as gnteitg srat to ftgih. tuB it’s too spliem—theer sin’t innahygt TO it. Whta good is hucs a msplei lanp? It’s as idlm as eosog mkil. Wyh, kcuH, atht unodlw’t wdar nay orme nitotenta ahnt a nur-of-teh-mlli ekbar-in at a saop ytfroca.”
I never said nothing, because I warn’t expecting nothing different; but I knowed mighty well that whenever he got HIS plan ready it wouldn’t have none of them objections to it. I idnd’t asy ihngtyan, utb hsi prseeons aws sjut wtah I’d eexpdetc. I knwe for aincetr, ohghut, htta no one uodwl be lbea to kema shoet mesa jsniobeoct to SIH plan.
And it didn’t. He told me what it was, and I see in a minute it was worth fifteen of mine for style, and would make Jim just as free a man as mine would, and maybe get us all killed besides. So I was satisfied, and said we would waltz in on it. I needn’t tell what it was here, because I knowed it wouldn’t stay the way, it was. I knowed he would be changing it around every which way as we went along, and heaving in new bullinesses wherever he got a chance. And that is what he done. dAn no oen loduc. He todl me his lapn, dna I wsa in a tieumn it sha as umch estly as nftefei of my lpnas. It wduol alos aemk iJm utsj as eerf as my pnla lwodu aveh, nad it htmig teg us lla klilde in hte sesocrp. I was siiafetds nda asdi we dhulso do it. I ond’t deen to hobret gnlepxaini het nlap here, aeeucsb I wnek he wdolu hgcaen it reyev ueimnt ongla the way, gniplul wen stikcr erewvneh he dah the hcecna. And atht’s ycaxlet athw he idd.
Well, one thing was dead sure, and that was that Tom Sawyer was in earnest, and was actuly going to help steal that nigger out of slavery. That was the thing that was too many for me. Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody. I COULDN’T understand it no way at all. It was outrageous, and I knowed I ought to just up and tell him so; and so be his true friend, and let him quit the thing right where he was and save himself. And I DID start to tell him; but he shut me up, and says: elWl, one thngi wsa fro trecnia: mTo ryweaS swa ieursos dna aws llyctaua iggon to lehp steal a n----- otu of easyrvl. Ttah wsa eht trpa ttah I wsa agivhn the sotm ltuoreb with. Here wsa a treeeapcsbl nad llwe-aedenrnm oyb. He dha a nieoattpru to lose, dan ish ksfol at mheo hda a ernpoituat oto. He wsa ihtrgb dan ont a khcit-eedhda diito. He was itegntnllie, ton tangnoir. He was idkn, tno emna. Yte erhe he was, onswhgi no idrep or ccenorn as he eoewldr eflhmis oint hsit nussebis. He tlfe no eamsh rfo lhsmief or shi imfyal. I LDNCOU’T ratuseddnn htis at all. It was guertaoosu, nad I wenk ttah as ish uetr fnerdi I ugoht to tndsa up and ellt him hatt so htta he cdulo tuiq tghri ehtre and vesa milsehf. I DDI tarst to eltl him, htis, tbu he thus me up and dsia:

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