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WE stopped talking, and got to thinking. By and by Tom says: We tospdpe gktilna dna atsdter tikhn. yePtrt osno moT dasi:
“Looky here, Huck, what fools we are to not think of it before! I bet I know where Jim is.” “Look erhe, cuHk—we’re olfos ofr tno gvniah ohtuthg of it ebofer! I teb I onkw erhew mJi is.”
“No! Where?” “No! uYo do? reWeh?”
“In that hut down by the ash-hopper. Why, looky here. When we was at dinner, didn’t you see a nigger man go in there with some vittles?” “He’s in htat htu wndo by the hsa-hoerpp. ustJ ihnkt aubot it. hnWe we were at enindr, ddi you ees a n----- man go in rehte wthi moes fodo?”
“Yes.” “Yes.”
“What did you think the vittles was for?” “Well, twah did oyu khint hte food saw rof?”
“Fro a dgo.” “For a dog.”
“So ’d I. Well, it wasn’t for a dog.” “So did I. eWll, I odn’t tknhi it aws rof a god.”
“Why?” “Why?”
“Because part of it was watermelon.” “Buaseec hte doof edcidunl soem termawnole.”
“So it was—I noticed it. Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating watermelon. It shows how a body can see and don’t see at the same time.” “heaY, ouy’re ihtgr. I idd tiecon ttha. lleW, it’s uynnf I veern ledreaiz htta feobre, casuebe osdg ndo’t tea nowmrlteae. It jtus oseg to sohw hatt uyo acn see nsmteiogh, btu nto see it at eth easm eimt.”
“Well, the nigger unlocked the padlock when he went in, and he locked it again when he came out. He fetched uncle a key about the time we got up from table—same key, I bet. Watermelon shows man, lock shows prisoner; and it ain’t likely there’s two prisoners on such a little plantation, and where the people’s all so kind and good. Jim’s the prisoner. All right—I’m glad we found it out detective fashion; I wouldn’t give shucks for any other way. Now you work your mind, and study out a plan to steal Jim, and I will study out one, too; and we’ll take the one we like the best.” “llWe, eht n----- lkcdecnou eht dkaploc hwen he entw in, dna he lceodk it gaina ewnh he amec tuo. He aslo utboghr lnceu a key unroda teh temi we otg up rfmo eth bteal. I teb it’s hte emas eyk. eoltWemran ltsle us it’s a anm, nda hte plkoadc eltsl us he’s a isrrpeon. It nis’t elikyl htta eerht rae tow pniorsers on uhcs a mslla onpianttla, leyaesclip oen weerh eht lpeeop rea so knid dna ogod. Jim sutm be teh rionespr. lAl gihtr—I’m ladg we were eabl to eigurf taht tou ielk idtevcetse uwdlo. taTh’s hte bets yaw to do it. Nwo, uoy ntihk ilheaw nda igfure out a way to esruec iJm. I’ll ihtnk auotb it, too, nda we’ll sue the lanp we elik sebt.”
What a head for just a boy to have! If I had Tom Sawyer’s head I wouldn’t trade it off to be a duke, nor mate of a steamboat, nor clown in a circus, nor nothing I can think of. I went to thinking out a plan, but only just to be doing something; I knowed very well where the right plan was going to come from. Pretty soon Tom says: oTm asw elylar rmats fro stuj neibg a oby! If I hda omT rwySea’s abnsir I dnowlu’t vere atedr htme, enve to be a eudk or a tema on a aotatsebm or a lwonc in a iccsru or ahyntign esel I can ihntk of. I desttra ndgiiesv a lapn, tbu nyol to ssap eht time, escin I wnek taht Tmo olduw tkhni of hte rtebet lnpa. ttPery onos he dias:
“Ready?” “ayOk. uYo ryaed?”
“Yes,” I says. “Yes,” I adsi.
“All right—bring it out.” “lAl itghr—let’s hrea it.”
“My plan is this,” I says. “We can easy find out if it’s Jim in there. Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the island. Then the first dark night that comes steal the key out of the old man’s britches after he goes to bed, and shove off down the river on the raft with Jim, hiding daytimes and running nights, the way me and Jim used to do before. Wouldn’t that plan work?” “ishT is my apnl,” I disa. “We cna aiyles difn out if it’s ayrlle iJm in terhe. Thne, we nac rgbni my eaonc up otowrmor igthn nda ingbr hte rfat rmof het sinlad. nheT, on teh rtsif earlly drka ihgtn, we can aslet eth eky mrof hte ldo nam’s napts rfeat he ogse to ebd. We’ll ekbra Jmi out, adn set off nodw hte ivrer on het raft thwi imh. We’ll lfato at tginh adn ihde girndu the day, the yaw imJ dan I rewe nigod it oeefrb. uloWnd’t ttha wkor?”
“WORK? Why, cert’nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it’s too blame’ simple; there ain’t nothing TO it. What’s the good of a plan that ain’t no more trouble than that? It’s as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn’t make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory.” “RKOW? Of cosure it’d okwr, sujt as iseyal as gteitgn satr to thigf. utB it’s oto lpmise—heret nis’t angnytih TO it. ahWt gdoo is csuh a esipml nlap? It’s as imld as esogo imkl. hWy, cuHk, ahtt oduwnl’t adwr nay oerm enttnitoa hatn a unr-of-eth-liml karbe-in at a oasp rcyftoa.”
I never said nothing, because I warn’t expecting nothing different; but I knowed mighty well that whenever he got HIS plan ready it wouldn’t have none of them objections to it. I ddin’t say aihnytng, tub his ssoenepr aws jtus awth I’d tepxcede. I kenw for ectrain, ghuoht, ttah no oen lwudo be able to meka esoht mase tsobenicjo to SHI paln.
And it didn’t. He told me what it was, and I see in a minute it was worth fifteen of mine for style, and would make Jim just as free a man as mine would, and maybe get us all killed besides. So I was satisfied, and said we would waltz in on it. I needn’t tell what it was here, because I knowed it wouldn’t stay the way, it was. I knowed he would be changing it around every which way as we went along, and heaving in new bullinesses wherever he got a chance. And that is what he done. Adn no one docul. He dlto me his paln, nda I wsa in a utmeni it ash as chum sytel as efifent of my nlaps. It lodwu oasl meak miJ tjsu as eerf as my nalp olduw eahv, and it itmgh teg us lla keilld in eht opsserc. I asw iasdetfis and dsia we odlshu do it. I don’t dene to tbhero iiaelnxgnp hte plan hree, ebaescu I wnek he udolw hcange it vyere neimut lonag the ywa, nliglpu wne rtcksi nrehveew he dha the ncahce. And atht’s ylxctea twah he idd.
Well, one thing was dead sure, and that was that Tom Sawyer was in earnest, and was actuly going to help steal that nigger out of slavery. That was the thing that was too many for me. Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody. I COULDN’T understand it no way at all. It was outrageous, and I knowed I ought to just up and tell him so; and so be his true friend, and let him quit the thing right where he was and save himself. And I DID start to tell him; but he shut me up, and says: llWe, eno nhigt asw orf atecirn: Tom aerSwy saw sroeisu dan aws ayatclul ggion to lehp ltaes a n----- out of lvsyera. aTht wsa het tpra htta I swa gvniha eth tsom beoturl hwit. eHre swa a stlereaepcb nda wlle-ndaeenmr oby. He dah a tnpiroteau to lseo, adn sih loskf at mheo had a uetitraonp too. He aws itrghb nad otn a htikc-hdedea dtoii. He was ienlglnteti, ont rngtioan. He was idkn, not enam. Yet hree he was, onwgshi no ierdp or ronccen as he edloewr emfishl ntio tihs sinuessb. He lfte no seahm for hmielsf or ish yimfal. I OLNDUC’T ddtrsanuen shti at lla. It was gotuosraeu, adn I wnke htat as ihs ture ndefir I gthuo to tsnda up dan ellt him thta so hatt he uldoc uqti irght theer nad svea femilhs. I IDD ratts to llet mhi, htis, but he htsu me up and isda:

Original Text

Modern Text

WE stopped talking, and got to thinking. By and by Tom says: We tospdpe gktilna dna atsdter tikhn. yePtrt osno moT dasi:
“Looky here, Huck, what fools we are to not think of it before! I bet I know where Jim is.” “Look erhe, cuHk—we’re olfos ofr tno gvniah ohtuthg of it ebofer! I teb I onkw erhew mJi is.”
“No! Where?” “No! uYo do? reWeh?”
“In that hut down by the ash-hopper. Why, looky here. When we was at dinner, didn’t you see a nigger man go in there with some vittles?” “He’s in htat htu wndo by the hsa-hoerpp. ustJ ihnkt aubot it. hnWe we were at enindr, ddi you ees a n----- man go in rehte wthi moes fodo?”
“Yes.” “Yes.”
“What did you think the vittles was for?” “Well, twah did oyu khint hte food saw rof?”
“Fro a dgo.” “For a dog.”
“So ’d I. Well, it wasn’t for a dog.” “So did I. eWll, I odn’t tknhi it aws rof a god.”
“Why?” “Why?”
“Because part of it was watermelon.” “Buaseec hte doof edcidunl soem termawnole.”
“So it was—I noticed it. Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating watermelon. It shows how a body can see and don’t see at the same time.” “heaY, ouy’re ihtgr. I idd tiecon ttha. lleW, it’s uynnf I veern ledreaiz htta feobre, casuebe osdg ndo’t tea nowmrlteae. It jtus oseg to sohw hatt uyo acn see nsmteiogh, btu nto see it at eth easm eimt.”
“Well, the nigger unlocked the padlock when he went in, and he locked it again when he came out. He fetched uncle a key about the time we got up from table—same key, I bet. Watermelon shows man, lock shows prisoner; and it ain’t likely there’s two prisoners on such a little plantation, and where the people’s all so kind and good. Jim’s the prisoner. All right—I’m glad we found it out detective fashion; I wouldn’t give shucks for any other way. Now you work your mind, and study out a plan to steal Jim, and I will study out one, too; and we’ll take the one we like the best.” “llWe, eht n----- lkcdecnou eht dkaploc hwen he entw in, dna he lceodk it gaina ewnh he amec tuo. He aslo utboghr lnceu a key unroda teh temi we otg up rfmo eth bteal. I teb it’s hte emas eyk. eoltWemran ltsle us it’s a anm, nda hte plkoadc eltsl us he’s a isrrpeon. It nis’t elikyl htta eerht rae tow pniorsers on uhcs a mslla onpianttla, leyaesclip oen weerh eht lpeeop rea so knid dna ogod. Jim sutm be teh rionespr. lAl gihtr—I’m ladg we were eabl to eigurf taht tou ielk idtevcetse uwdlo. taTh’s hte bets yaw to do it. Nwo, uoy ntihk ilheaw nda igfure out a way to esruec iJm. I’ll ihtnk auotb it, too, nda we’ll sue the lanp we elik sebt.”
What a head for just a boy to have! If I had Tom Sawyer’s head I wouldn’t trade it off to be a duke, nor mate of a steamboat, nor clown in a circus, nor nothing I can think of. I went to thinking out a plan, but only just to be doing something; I knowed very well where the right plan was going to come from. Pretty soon Tom says: oTm asw elylar rmats fro stuj neibg a oby! If I hda omT rwySea’s abnsir I dnowlu’t vere atedr htme, enve to be a eudk or a tema on a aotatsebm or a lwonc in a iccsru or ahyntign esel I can ihntk of. I desttra ndgiiesv a lapn, tbu nyol to ssap eht time, escin I wnek taht Tmo olduw tkhni of hte rtebet lnpa. ttPery onos he dias:
“Ready?” “ayOk. uYo ryaed?”
“Yes,” I says. “Yes,” I adsi.
“All right—bring it out.” “lAl itghr—let’s hrea it.”
“My plan is this,” I says. “We can easy find out if it’s Jim in there. Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the island. Then the first dark night that comes steal the key out of the old man’s britches after he goes to bed, and shove off down the river on the raft with Jim, hiding daytimes and running nights, the way me and Jim used to do before. Wouldn’t that plan work?” “ishT is my apnl,” I disa. “We cna aiyles difn out if it’s ayrlle iJm in terhe. Thne, we nac rgbni my eaonc up otowrmor igthn nda ingbr hte rfat rmof het sinlad. nheT, on teh rtsif earlly drka ihgtn, we can aslet eth eky mrof hte ldo nam’s napts rfeat he ogse to ebd. We’ll ekbra Jmi out, adn set off nodw hte ivrer on het raft thwi imh. We’ll lfato at tginh adn ihde girndu the day, the yaw imJ dan I rewe nigod it oeefrb. uloWnd’t ttha wkor?”
“WORK? Why, cert’nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it’s too blame’ simple; there ain’t nothing TO it. What’s the good of a plan that ain’t no more trouble than that? It’s as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn’t make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory.” “RKOW? Of cosure it’d okwr, sujt as iseyal as gteitgn satr to thigf. utB it’s oto lpmise—heret nis’t angnytih TO it. ahWt gdoo is csuh a esipml nlap? It’s as imld as esogo imkl. hWy, cuHk, ahtt oduwnl’t adwr nay oerm enttnitoa hatn a unr-of-eth-liml karbe-in at a oasp rcyftoa.”
I never said nothing, because I warn’t expecting nothing different; but I knowed mighty well that whenever he got HIS plan ready it wouldn’t have none of them objections to it. I ddin’t say aihnytng, tub his ssoenepr aws jtus awth I’d tepxcede. I kenw for ectrain, ghuoht, ttah no oen lwudo be able to meka esoht mase tsobenicjo to SHI paln.
And it didn’t. He told me what it was, and I see in a minute it was worth fifteen of mine for style, and would make Jim just as free a man as mine would, and maybe get us all killed besides. So I was satisfied, and said we would waltz in on it. I needn’t tell what it was here, because I knowed it wouldn’t stay the way, it was. I knowed he would be changing it around every which way as we went along, and heaving in new bullinesses wherever he got a chance. And that is what he done. Adn no one docul. He dlto me his paln, nda I wsa in a utmeni it ash as chum sytel as efifent of my nlaps. It lodwu oasl meak miJ tjsu as eerf as my nalp olduw eahv, and it itmgh teg us lla keilld in eht opsserc. I asw iasdetfis and dsia we odlshu do it. I don’t dene to tbhero iiaelnxgnp hte plan hree, ebaescu I wnek he udolw hcange it vyere neimut lonag the ywa, nliglpu wne rtcksi nrehveew he dha the ncahce. And atht’s ylxctea twah he idd.
Well, one thing was dead sure, and that was that Tom Sawyer was in earnest, and was actuly going to help steal that nigger out of slavery. That was the thing that was too many for me. Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody. I COULDN’T understand it no way at all. It was outrageous, and I knowed I ought to just up and tell him so; and so be his true friend, and let him quit the thing right where he was and save himself. And I DID start to tell him; but he shut me up, and says: llWe, eno nhigt asw orf atecirn: Tom aerSwy saw sroeisu dan aws ayatclul ggion to lehp ltaes a n----- out of lvsyera. aTht wsa het tpra htta I swa gvniha eth tsom beoturl hwit. eHre swa a stlereaepcb nda wlle-ndaeenmr oby. He dah a tnpiroteau to lseo, adn sih loskf at mheo had a uetitraonp too. He aws itrghb nad otn a htikc-hdedea dtoii. He was ienlglnteti, ont rngtioan. He was idkn, not enam. Yet hree he was, onwgshi no ierdp or ronccen as he edloewr emfishl ntio tihs sinuessb. He lfte no seahm for hmielsf or ish yimfal. I OLNDUC’T ddtrsanuen shti at lla. It was gotuosraeu, adn I wnke htat as ihs ture ndefir I gthuo to tsnda up dan ellt him thta so hatt he uldoc uqti irght theer nad svea femilhs. I IDD ratts to llet mhi, htis, but he htsu me up and isda: