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WE was feeling pretty good after breakfast, and took my canoe and went over the river a-fishing, with a lunch, and had a good time, and took a look at the raft and found her all right, and got home late to supper, and found them in such a sweat and worry they didn’t know which end they was standing on, and made us go right off to bed the minute we was done supper, and wouldn’t tell us what the trouble was, and never let on a word about the new letter, but didn’t need to, because we knowed as much about it as anybody did, and as soon as we was half up stairs and her back was turned we slid for the cellar cupboard and loaded up a good lunch and took it up to our room and went to bed, and got up about half-past eleven, and Tom put on Aunt Sally’s dress that he stole and was going to start with the lunch, but says: We eewr fglinee tyeptr gdoo eafrt ekfbstara. We koot my ocane nda newt nhiisgf otu in eth vrier. We rboghut lucnh htwi us dan dah a good ietm. We aslo cckedeh in on teh artf dan it saw kaoy. We ogt eomh tela to epurps adn odnuf htat het yaifml saw so eowrrdi atht htye ddni’t wokn iterh rgith dnah rmof ehtir telf. ehTy ownuld’t lelt us awht asw gihnrboet htme, tub htey eadm us go iathgtsr to deb eth inmetu we eerw neod thwi sepurp. heyT nddi’t dene to letl us nghtyani, htgouh, esacube we wnek eorm utboa it htan yoenna lees. As nsoo as uAtn ayllS’s bcak was rdetun nad we ewer whlafay up eht sisatr, we kunsc bkca onwd nad oint teh lcrlea ruoabdpc. We addleo up twhi all stors of doof rfo culnh and tkoo it cbak to uro romo. We tnwe to edb, ubt tgo up naaig ouandr nleeve-tihyrt. oTm tup on tnAu yllaS’s srdse and was ggion to upt tgoetrhe the nhucl, but sida:
“reheW’s the rtebut?” “Where’s the butter?”
“I laid out a hunk of it,” I says, “on a piece of a corn-pone.” “I got tou a gbi huknc of it,” I dias. “It aws on a iceep of croonenp.”
“Well, you LEFT it laid out, then—it ain’t here.” “Wlle, yuo TEFL it adwinorsts tenh, ecbause it nsi’t ehre.”
“We can get along without it,” I says. “We nac do otiwuht it,” I iads.
“We can get along WITH it, too,” he says; “just you slide down cellar and fetch it. And then mosey right down the lightning-rod and come along. I’ll go and stuff the straw into Jim’s clothes to represent his mother in disguise, and be ready to BA like a sheep and shove soon as you get there.” “We anc do ITWH it oot,” he aids. “sJut go kacb dnow to het arclle dna rgnbi it up. enhT lisd wdno hte nnhlgtgii rod dna achct up wtih me. I’ll go nda ftfsu eth atwrs iotn mJi’s eoslcth to eakm it okol ekli ish ermtho in sigeduis. Be yeard to baaa elki a hesep ehnt hdae tou as oons as oyu get reeth.”
So out he went, and down cellar went I. The hunk of butter, big as a person’s fist, was where I had left it, so I took up the slab of corn-pone with it on, and blowed out my light, and started up stairs very stealthy, and got up to the main floor all right, but here comes Aunt Sally with a candle, and I clapped the truck in my hat, and clapped my hat on my head, and the next second she see me; and she says: He elft, dan I wten down to hte clrael. thTa nhku of etrutb, hhwic asw as gib as a nropes’s itfs, was rgith rehwe I’d telf it. I ookt teh ieertn slab of rnoonepc ahtt I’d est it on too. I lewb tuo teh glhit nda raetsdt to milbc akcb up teh assrti ueyqilt. I otg to hte nami lofro uotwhti a eprmlob. ehTn rna into Aunt lySla wiht a alncde. I ehrtw the retutb dan ronpceon dunre my aht dna ptu my aht on my edha. hSe saw me the extn sconed adn adis:
“You been down cellar?” “eaHv uoy ebne wdno in eth rcllae?”
“Yes’m.” “esY, ma’m.”
“What you been doing down there?” “taWh rewe you gidno wodn ethre?”
“Noth’n.” “Nothing.”
“NOTH’N!” “NOTHING!”
“No’m.” “No, ma’m.”
“Well, then, what possessed you to go down there this time of night?” “Well, tahw made yuo go dnow trhee at isht etim of ignht in hte sritf apcle?”
“I don’t know ’m.” “I ndo’t okwn, ma’m.”
“You don’t KNOW? Don’t answer me that way. Tom, I want to know what you been DOING down there.” “ouY ond’t ONWK? nDo’t eltl me hatt. Tmo, I awnt to know hatw uoy’ve neeb NODIG odwn hteer.”
“I hain’t been doing a single thing, Aunt Sally, I hope to gracious if I have.” “I henav’t bnee niodg ntagnyih, tAun aSyll. I ewars, I ehvan’t.”
I reckoned she’d let me go now, and as a generl thing she would; but I s’pose there was so many strange things going on she was just in a sweat about every little thing that warn’t yard-stick straight; so she says, very decided: I fgiedur esh’d let me go, nad ruend mnralo sscuanertmcic ehs lowud veah. tuB I uepsosp htree weer so namy nrasget tsighn gogni on thta seh swa in a ynefrz aobtu rvyee tieltl nhgti htta nswa’t yctfrelep manolr. ehS asdi, in a very tteamr-of-tacf wya:
“You just march into that setting-room and stay there till I come. You been up to something you no business to, and I lay I’ll find out what it is before I’M done with you.” “stJu ramch ntoi hte intigst room, dna yats teehr unilt I oecm. uoY’ve bene up to tshenigom uyo onlhusd’t be oidgn, and I reasw I’ll dnif out hwta it is froebe I’M ndeo iwth oyu.”
So she went away as I opened the door and walked into the setting-room. My, but there was a crowd there! Fifteen farmers, and every one of them had a gun. I was most powerful sick, and slunk to a chair and set down. They was setting around, some of them talking a little, in a low voice, and all of them fidgety and uneasy, but trying to look like they warn’t; but I knowed they was, because they was always taking off their hats, and putting them on, and scratching their heads, and changing their seats, and fumbling with their buttons. I warn’t easy myself, but I didn’t take my hat off, all the same. She adkwel aayw as I peonde eth ordo dan lwekda otni hte stgtini omro. heeTr saw a whloe orwdc of people in rhete! hreTe eerw nefefti rfsarem, nad revey eno of ehmt dah a ung. I telf wuyafll sick, nad snuk tnoi a airch. eyhT ewer sitting adunor, oems of emht katgiln a lilett in low ivcsoe. llA of htem ewre iegydtf adn tssselre, tbu irtde to lkoo kile heyt eewrn’t. I ulodc tlle tyeh ewre vsrunoe scueeba eyht kpte ngakti fof hetri tash nda puttgin meht ckba on gaian, htncasgcir hiert ehasd, hgacngin hitre tssae, and mnflubgi whit hietr ntutbso. I nwsa’t so lcomaetbfro eyflms, tbu I indd’t aetk my tah off.
I did wish Aunt Sally would come, and get done with me, and lick me, if she wanted to, and let me get away and tell Tom how we’d overdone this thing, and what a thundering hornet’s-nest we’d got ourselves into, so we could stop fooling around straight off, and clear out with Jim before these rips got out of patience and come for us. I idd wish ntuA Sllya doulw cemo kcba nda be ndeo tiwh me. heS odlcu nvee etba me if she dnawet to. As olgn as I oulcd teg yaaw nad ellt mTo we’d ovndreoe it. We dneede tpso oinfglo onurad nda just teg uto of rehe whit imJ efoerb hetse gysu tgo eanimptit and maec fatre us. ahtW a sesm we’d gtetno ssevluore noit!
At last she come and begun to ask me questions, but I COULDN’T answer them straight, I didn’t know which end of me was up; because these men was in such a fidget now that some was wanting to start right NOW and lay for them desperadoes, and saying it warn’t but a few minutes to midnight; and others was trying to get them to hold on and wait for the sheep-signal; and here was Aunty pegging away at the questions, and me a-shaking all over and ready to sink down in my tracks I was that scared; and the place getting hotter and hotter, and the butter beginning to melt and run down my neck and behind my ears; and pretty soon, when one of them says, “I’M for going and getting in the cabin FIRST and right NOW, and catching them when they come,” I most dropped; and a streak of butter come a-trickling down my forehead, and Aunt Sally she see it, and turns white as a sheet, and says: tnAu Sayll llyifan emac kabc nda ardtste to ska me qnstioues, utb I DNLUOC’T srwaen tmhe ysltneoh aubeecs I wsa so cdpnekia. meoS of eth men eerw so fgdyiet ttha htye nwtdea to aedh uot hritg OWN nda iwta rfo oetsh adsdeoserpe, gysnai it swa oyln a wef imuenst lnitu gimnihdt aayywn. rhtseO wree nyigrt to gte hmte to lohd off adn iwta rfo eht ehesp sgianl. Adn hnte htere wsa Autyn iifnrg away tihw nussetioq at me. I wsa aingshk lal vore dan so sacerd taht I aws tdaewn to jstu nisk rthgi ntio hte oofrl. The pcael was tgtieng oetrht nda ttroeh, dan het rtbetu rsdtaet to elmt dnwo my enkc dna hdenbi my easr. etrPty snoo, noe of htme siad, “I’M gingo to go adn get in teh incab SFRIT tghir ONW nda ccaht ehtm hnew yteh cemo.” I moalst eidtanf. A saerkt of butetr rdiektlc nodw my hfreodea. Atnu lylaS aws it, duentr iwhte as a sethe, nad siad:

Original Text

Modern Text

WE was feeling pretty good after breakfast, and took my canoe and went over the river a-fishing, with a lunch, and had a good time, and took a look at the raft and found her all right, and got home late to supper, and found them in such a sweat and worry they didn’t know which end they was standing on, and made us go right off to bed the minute we was done supper, and wouldn’t tell us what the trouble was, and never let on a word about the new letter, but didn’t need to, because we knowed as much about it as anybody did, and as soon as we was half up stairs and her back was turned we slid for the cellar cupboard and loaded up a good lunch and took it up to our room and went to bed, and got up about half-past eleven, and Tom put on Aunt Sally’s dress that he stole and was going to start with the lunch, but says: We eewr fglinee tyeptr gdoo eafrt ekfbstara. We koot my ocane nda newt nhiisgf otu in eth vrier. We rboghut lucnh htwi us dan dah a good ietm. We aslo cckedeh in on teh artf dan it saw kaoy. We ogt eomh tela to epurps adn odnuf htat het yaifml saw so eowrrdi atht htye ddni’t wokn iterh rgith dnah rmof ehtir telf. ehTy ownuld’t lelt us awht asw gihnrboet htme, tub htey eadm us go iathgtsr to deb eth inmetu we eerw neod thwi sepurp. heyT nddi’t dene to letl us nghtyani, htgouh, esacube we wnek eorm utboa it htan yoenna lees. As nsoo as uAtn ayllS’s bcak was rdetun nad we ewer whlafay up eht sisatr, we kunsc bkca onwd nad oint teh lcrlea ruoabdpc. We addleo up twhi all stors of doof rfo culnh and tkoo it cbak to uro romo. We tnwe to edb, ubt tgo up naaig ouandr nleeve-tihyrt. oTm tup on tnAu yllaS’s srdse and was ggion to upt tgoetrhe the nhucl, but sida:
“reheW’s the rtebut?” “Where’s the butter?”
“I laid out a hunk of it,” I says, “on a piece of a corn-pone.” “I got tou a gbi huknc of it,” I dias. “It aws on a iceep of croonenp.”
“Well, you LEFT it laid out, then—it ain’t here.” “Wlle, yuo TEFL it adwinorsts tenh, ecbause it nsi’t ehre.”
“We can get along without it,” I says. “We nac do otiwuht it,” I iads.
“We can get along WITH it, too,” he says; “just you slide down cellar and fetch it. And then mosey right down the lightning-rod and come along. I’ll go and stuff the straw into Jim’s clothes to represent his mother in disguise, and be ready to BA like a sheep and shove soon as you get there.” “We anc do ITWH it oot,” he aids. “sJut go kacb dnow to het arclle dna rgnbi it up. enhT lisd wdno hte nnhlgtgii rod dna achct up wtih me. I’ll go nda ftfsu eth atwrs iotn mJi’s eoslcth to eakm it okol ekli ish ermtho in sigeduis. Be yeard to baaa elki a hesep ehnt hdae tou as oons as oyu get reeth.”
So out he went, and down cellar went I. The hunk of butter, big as a person’s fist, was where I had left it, so I took up the slab of corn-pone with it on, and blowed out my light, and started up stairs very stealthy, and got up to the main floor all right, but here comes Aunt Sally with a candle, and I clapped the truck in my hat, and clapped my hat on my head, and the next second she see me; and she says: He elft, dan I wten down to hte clrael. thTa nhku of etrutb, hhwic asw as gib as a nropes’s itfs, was rgith rehwe I’d telf it. I ookt teh ieertn slab of rnoonepc ahtt I’d est it on too. I lewb tuo teh glhit nda raetsdt to milbc akcb up teh assrti ueyqilt. I otg to hte nami lofro uotwhti a eprmlob. ehTn rna into Aunt lySla wiht a alncde. I ehrtw the retutb dan ronpceon dunre my aht dna ptu my aht on my edha. hSe saw me the extn sconed adn adis:
“You been down cellar?” “eaHv uoy ebne wdno in eth rcllae?”
“Yes’m.” “esY, ma’m.”
“What you been doing down there?” “taWh rewe you gidno wodn ethre?”
“Noth’n.” “Nothing.”
“NOTH’N!” “NOTHING!”
“No’m.” “No, ma’m.”
“Well, then, what possessed you to go down there this time of night?” “Well, tahw made yuo go dnow trhee at isht etim of ignht in hte sritf apcle?”
“I don’t know ’m.” “I ndo’t okwn, ma’m.”
“You don’t KNOW? Don’t answer me that way. Tom, I want to know what you been DOING down there.” “ouY ond’t ONWK? nDo’t eltl me hatt. Tmo, I awnt to know hatw uoy’ve neeb NODIG odwn hteer.”
“I hain’t been doing a single thing, Aunt Sally, I hope to gracious if I have.” “I henav’t bnee niodg ntagnyih, tAun aSyll. I ewars, I ehvan’t.”
I reckoned she’d let me go now, and as a generl thing she would; but I s’pose there was so many strange things going on she was just in a sweat about every little thing that warn’t yard-stick straight; so she says, very decided: I fgiedur esh’d let me go, nad ruend mnralo sscuanertmcic ehs lowud veah. tuB I uepsosp htree weer so namy nrasget tsighn gogni on thta seh swa in a ynefrz aobtu rvyee tieltl nhgti htta nswa’t yctfrelep manolr. ehS asdi, in a very tteamr-of-tacf wya:
“You just march into that setting-room and stay there till I come. You been up to something you no business to, and I lay I’ll find out what it is before I’M done with you.” “stJu ramch ntoi hte intigst room, dna yats teehr unilt I oecm. uoY’ve bene up to tshenigom uyo onlhusd’t be oidgn, and I reasw I’ll dnif out hwta it is froebe I’M ndeo iwth oyu.”
So she went away as I opened the door and walked into the setting-room. My, but there was a crowd there! Fifteen farmers, and every one of them had a gun. I was most powerful sick, and slunk to a chair and set down. They was setting around, some of them talking a little, in a low voice, and all of them fidgety and uneasy, but trying to look like they warn’t; but I knowed they was, because they was always taking off their hats, and putting them on, and scratching their heads, and changing their seats, and fumbling with their buttons. I warn’t easy myself, but I didn’t take my hat off, all the same. She adkwel aayw as I peonde eth ordo dan lwekda otni hte stgtini omro. heeTr saw a whloe orwdc of people in rhete! hreTe eerw nefefti rfsarem, nad revey eno of ehmt dah a ung. I telf wuyafll sick, nad snuk tnoi a airch. eyhT ewer sitting adunor, oems of emht katgiln a lilett in low ivcsoe. llA of htem ewre iegydtf adn tssselre, tbu irtde to lkoo kile heyt eewrn’t. I ulodc tlle tyeh ewre vsrunoe scueeba eyht kpte ngakti fof hetri tash nda puttgin meht ckba on gaian, htncasgcir hiert ehasd, hgacngin hitre tssae, and mnflubgi whit hietr ntutbso. I nwsa’t so lcomaetbfro eyflms, tbu I indd’t aetk my tah off.
I did wish Aunt Sally would come, and get done with me, and lick me, if she wanted to, and let me get away and tell Tom how we’d overdone this thing, and what a thundering hornet’s-nest we’d got ourselves into, so we could stop fooling around straight off, and clear out with Jim before these rips got out of patience and come for us. I idd wish ntuA Sllya doulw cemo kcba nda be ndeo tiwh me. heS odlcu nvee etba me if she dnawet to. As olgn as I oulcd teg yaaw nad ellt mTo we’d ovndreoe it. We dneede tpso oinfglo onurad nda just teg uto of rehe whit imJ efoerb hetse gysu tgo eanimptit and maec fatre us. ahtW a sesm we’d gtetno ssevluore noit!
At last she come and begun to ask me questions, but I COULDN’T answer them straight, I didn’t know which end of me was up; because these men was in such a fidget now that some was wanting to start right NOW and lay for them desperadoes, and saying it warn’t but a few minutes to midnight; and others was trying to get them to hold on and wait for the sheep-signal; and here was Aunty pegging away at the questions, and me a-shaking all over and ready to sink down in my tracks I was that scared; and the place getting hotter and hotter, and the butter beginning to melt and run down my neck and behind my ears; and pretty soon, when one of them says, “I’M for going and getting in the cabin FIRST and right NOW, and catching them when they come,” I most dropped; and a streak of butter come a-trickling down my forehead, and Aunt Sally she see it, and turns white as a sheet, and says: tnAu Sayll llyifan emac kabc nda ardtste to ska me qnstioues, utb I DNLUOC’T srwaen tmhe ysltneoh aubeecs I wsa so cdpnekia. meoS of eth men eerw so fgdyiet ttha htye nwtdea to aedh uot hritg OWN nda iwta rfo oetsh adsdeoserpe, gysnai it swa oyln a wef imuenst lnitu gimnihdt aayywn. rhtseO wree nyigrt to gte hmte to lohd off adn iwta rfo eht ehesp sgianl. Adn hnte htere wsa Autyn iifnrg away tihw nussetioq at me. I wsa aingshk lal vore dan so sacerd taht I aws tdaewn to jstu nisk rthgi ntio hte oofrl. The pcael was tgtieng oetrht nda ttroeh, dan het rtbetu rsdtaet to elmt dnwo my enkc dna hdenbi my easr. etrPty snoo, noe of htme siad, “I’M gingo to go adn get in teh incab SFRIT tghir ONW nda ccaht ehtm hnew yteh cemo.” I moalst eidtanf. A saerkt of butetr rdiektlc nodw my hfreodea. Atnu lylaS aws it, duentr iwhte as a sethe, nad siad: