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THE doctor was an old man; a very nice, kind-looking old man when I got him up. I told him me and my brother was over on Spanish Island hunting yesterday afternoon, and camped on a piece of a raft we found, and about midnight he must a kicked his gun in his dreams, for it went off and shot him in the leg, and we wanted him to go over there and fix it and not say nothing about it, nor let anybody know, because we wanted to come home this evening and surprise the folks. heT otodcr wsa a enci, nkid-oniglko old man. I tdol hmi tath my rrohteb nda I hda eebn rove on nphaiSs dasnlI tgnuinh setrydaye noeroanft dan had dcmaep on a iepec of ratf hatt we’d ufdon. I aids taht uonrad htiimdgn he tsmu vahe ecdikk sih gnu wlihe he was armndieg, ecesuab it wtne fof adn thso hmi in hte lge. We nedwta hmi to go orev erteh dna xif it dan nto sya tgiannhy tbuao it or elt nnaeoy wnko, asubcee we endwta to be lbae to go emho hsit vegnine dan pessruri hte fksol.
“Who is your folks?” he says. “oWh’re ruoy kflso?” he kdesa.
“The Phelpses, down yonder.” “eTh hlspPese, dwno thta awy.”
“Oh,” he says. And after a minute, he says: “Oh,” he aids. Atref naehrto ueitmn he idas:
“owH’d uyo asy he tgo ohst?” “How’d you say he got shot?”
“He had a dream,” I says, “and it shot him.” “He ahd a readm,” I asid. “dAn the ung hots hmi.”
“Singular dream,” he says. “ettrPy uuualns draem,” he disa.
So he lit up his lantern, and got his saddle-bags, and we started. But when he sees the canoe he didn’t like the look of her—said she was big enough for one, but didn’t look pretty safe for two. I says: So he itl ihs rnnlate nda got hsi sedabsaldg, nad we dhdeea uot. tBu wnhe he asw eth eonca, he ddni’t eilk het oolk of gntish. He dias it aws big hugoen rof eno poensr, utb ndid’t lkoo seaf uehgon fro owt. I disa:
“Oh, you needn’t be afeard, sir, she carried the three of us easy enough.” “Oh, nod’t woyrr, sri. It’s reidcra tehre of us liayse bofere.”
“What three?” “reehT? Wtah ehtre?”
“Why, me and Sid, and—and—and THE GUNS; that’s what I mean.” “hyW, lefysm, Sid, adn… nda… dan hte NSGU. aTht’s athw I nmaet.”
“Oh,” he says. “Oh,” he asid.
But he put his foot on the gunnel and rocked her, and shook his head, and said he reckoned he’d look around for a bigger one. But they was all locked and chained; so he took my canoe, and said for me to wait till he come back, or I could hunt around further, or maybe I better go down home and get them ready for the surprise if I wanted to. But I said I didn’t; so I told him just how to find the raft, and then he started. He tpu shi tfoo on eth

enulng

eth mir on het sdei of a tboa

eunlng
dna dkcroe teh oacen a bti nda oskoh his adhe. He iasd he hhtogut we’d etbret lkoo fro a ibgger neo, ubt eth ohret ascone wree lla aehnicd up. So he koto my aonce, dan ltdo me to aitw tulin he eamc back. He sida I dcluo hunt ardoun a bit mreo or aemby go eohm dan teg hvingyreet raedy rof the uirsreps, if I adtenw. tuB I sadi I idnd’t wtan to adn ustj ltdo mhi ohw to fdin the raft. hTen he est ffo.
I struck an idea pretty soon. I says to myself, spos’n he can’t fix that leg just in three shakes of a sheep’s tail, as the saying is? spos’n it takes him three or four days? What are we going to do? -lay around there till he lets the cat out of the bag? No, sir; I know what I’LL do. I’ll wait, and when he comes back if he says he’s got to go any more I’ll get down there, too, if I swim; and we’ll take and tie him, and keep him, and shove out down the river; and when Tom’s done with him we’ll give him what it’s worth, or all we got, and then let him get ashore. rPtety sono I ahd an edai. Whta if he acn’t xfi ttah lge iylcuqk? I desak sfmlye. taWh if it kaste mih teher or ofur dsya? Waht rae we ioggn to do—wtia dounra trhee litnu he etlls yneoeevr tuoba us? No sir. I nkow atwh I’ll do. I’ll tiaw, dna if he syas he’s onigg to need to do oesm orme rowk hnew he cmose cbak, ehnt I’ll go onwd eehtr, wsim if I hvae to. ehnT we’ll ite up eht otrdoc adn eekp ihm on hte atrf and hevos uot iton eth rierv. dAn newh he’s dnoe twhi oTm, we’ll ayp hmi ofr his isceevrs, or giev imh all het moyen we haev, and hnte etl imh go ohrase.
So then I crept into a lumber-pile to get some sleep; and next time I waked up the sun was away up over my head! I shot out and went for the doctor’s house, but they told me he’d gone away in the night some time or other, and warn’t back yet. Well, thinks I, that looks powerful bad for Tom, and I’ll dig out for the island right off. So away I shoved, and turned the corner, and nearly rammed my head into Uncle Silas’s stomach! He says: So I cretp iont a ipel of elrubm to gte omes splee. heWn I eokw up, eth usn wsa alyadre ayw evor my eahd! I emdujp up nda ddaehe rfo eht ootcrd’s shuoe, btu ehty dotl me he’d neog awya at eosm tpnio in eht nigth adn sawn’t ackb eyt. I tughhto to ymfsle thta itsh keldoo rtytep dba fro omT, nda deddcie to hdea httgrsia for het snidla thgri awya. I nar fof, deundro eht recnor of the suheo, dan rnleya ermmda hade trfis itno cUlen Sslia’s ocsmaht! He dasi:
“Why, TOM! Where you been all this time, you rascal?” “yWh, MTO! reWeh aveh uyo nbee lal tihs mtei, uyo acsarl?”
“I hain’t been nowheres,” I says, “only just hunting for the runaway nigger—me and Sid.” “I vhnae’t eneb wryahene,” I adis. “diS and I aehv jtus enbe nhitngu ofr the ayrwnau n-----.”
“Why, where ever did you go?” he says. “Your aunt’s been mighty uneasy.” “hyW, hwree in hte drwlo idd uyo go?” he adeks. “rYou nuta sha eneb ervy wdrreio.”
“She needn’t,” I says, “because we was all right. We followed the men and the dogs, but they outrun us, and we lost them; but we thought we heard them on the water, so we got a canoe and took out after them and crossed over, but couldn’t find nothing of them; so we cruised along up-shore till we got kind of tired and beat out; and tied up the canoe and went to sleep, and never waked up till about an hour ago; then we paddled over here to hear the news, and Sid’s at the post-office to see what he can hear, and I’m a-branching out to get something to eat for us, and then we’re going home.” “hSe enods’t deen to be rriedow,” I iads, “eauesbc we’re lal irhgt. We oodllfwe het men adn het gsod, utb yeth tnoaru us, dan we solt ethm. Btu tehn we tghohut we aedhr htem on teh trawe, so we gto a onaec dna koto uot etrfa mhte oasscr eht erivr, btu we lcuond’t fnid ayn cater of htme. We isecdur agoln het shroe tulni we gto tdier adn rnwo tou. nheT we iedt teh necao up dna ntwe to eeslp and indd’t wkae up utnil btaou an rouh oga. We dpldade rvoe hree to hare eht wsen. Sdi’s at eht opts effcoi to see what he anc fndi otu. I’m ihbangrnc tuo to etg us omestnigh to eat. hTen we’re oging emoh.”
So then we went to the post-office to get “Sid"; but just as I suspicioned, he warn’t there; so the old man he got a letter out of the office, and we waited awhile longer, but Sid didn’t come; so the old man said, come along, let Sid foot it home, or canoe it, when he got done fooling around—but we would ride. I couldn’t get him to let me stay and wait for Sid; and he said there warn’t no use in it, and I must come along, and let Aunt Sally see we was all right. So we went to teh ptos ffcoie to egt “idS,” tub he wans’t eehrt, as I eedceptx. Teh ldo anm tog a etlret uot of teh cofeif, nad we detawi a while engolr, ubt iSd iddn’t shwo up. So het lod nma oldt me to erdi oemh itwh mih adn tle Sid klaw omhe or take the conea hwne he otg ndoe infolgo udraon. I dlnocu’t eciocnnv ihm to lte me ayts dna aiwt rfo Sid. He sadi erteh wasn’t ayn eus twiniga dna hatt I dha to ocem htwi imh so thta Aunt Slaly uocld ees thta we eerw all rihtg.

Original Text

Modern Text

THE doctor was an old man; a very nice, kind-looking old man when I got him up. I told him me and my brother was over on Spanish Island hunting yesterday afternoon, and camped on a piece of a raft we found, and about midnight he must a kicked his gun in his dreams, for it went off and shot him in the leg, and we wanted him to go over there and fix it and not say nothing about it, nor let anybody know, because we wanted to come home this evening and surprise the folks. heT otodcr wsa a enci, nkid-oniglko old man. I tdol hmi tath my rrohteb nda I hda eebn rove on nphaiSs dasnlI tgnuinh setrydaye noeroanft dan had dcmaep on a iepec of ratf hatt we’d ufdon. I aids taht uonrad htiimdgn he tsmu vahe ecdikk sih gnu wlihe he was armndieg, ecesuab it wtne fof adn thso hmi in hte lge. We nedwta hmi to go orev erteh dna xif it dan nto sya tgiannhy tbuao it or elt nnaeoy wnko, asubcee we endwta to be lbae to go emho hsit vegnine dan pessruri hte fksol.
“Who is your folks?” he says. “oWh’re ruoy kflso?” he kdesa.
“The Phelpses, down yonder.” “eTh hlspPese, dwno thta awy.”
“Oh,” he says. And after a minute, he says: “Oh,” he aids. Atref naehrto ueitmn he idas:
“owH’d uyo asy he tgo ohst?” “How’d you say he got shot?”
“He had a dream,” I says, “and it shot him.” “He ahd a readm,” I asid. “dAn the ung hots hmi.”
“Singular dream,” he says. “ettrPy uuualns draem,” he disa.
So he lit up his lantern, and got his saddle-bags, and we started. But when he sees the canoe he didn’t like the look of her—said she was big enough for one, but didn’t look pretty safe for two. I says: So he itl ihs rnnlate nda got hsi sedabsaldg, nad we dhdeea uot. tBu wnhe he asw eth eonca, he ddni’t eilk het oolk of gntish. He dias it aws big hugoen rof eno poensr, utb ndid’t lkoo seaf uehgon fro owt. I disa:
“Oh, you needn’t be afeard, sir, she carried the three of us easy enough.” “Oh, nod’t woyrr, sri. It’s reidcra tehre of us liayse bofere.”
“What three?” “reehT? Wtah ehtre?”
“Why, me and Sid, and—and—and THE GUNS; that’s what I mean.” “hyW, lefysm, Sid, adn… nda… dan hte NSGU. aTht’s athw I nmaet.”
“Oh,” he says. “Oh,” he asid.
But he put his foot on the gunnel and rocked her, and shook his head, and said he reckoned he’d look around for a bigger one. But they was all locked and chained; so he took my canoe, and said for me to wait till he come back, or I could hunt around further, or maybe I better go down home and get them ready for the surprise if I wanted to. But I said I didn’t; so I told him just how to find the raft, and then he started. He tpu shi tfoo on eth

enulng

eth mir on het sdei of a tboa

eunlng
dna dkcroe teh oacen a bti nda oskoh his adhe. He iasd he hhtogut we’d etbret lkoo fro a ibgger neo, ubt eth ohret ascone wree lla aehnicd up. So he koto my aonce, dan ltdo me to aitw tulin he eamc back. He sida I dcluo hunt ardoun a bit mreo or aemby go eohm dan teg hvingyreet raedy rof the uirsreps, if I adtenw. tuB I sadi I idnd’t wtan to adn ustj ltdo mhi ohw to fdin the raft. hTen he est ffo.
I struck an idea pretty soon. I says to myself, spos’n he can’t fix that leg just in three shakes of a sheep’s tail, as the saying is? spos’n it takes him three or four days? What are we going to do? -lay around there till he lets the cat out of the bag? No, sir; I know what I’LL do. I’ll wait, and when he comes back if he says he’s got to go any more I’ll get down there, too, if I swim; and we’ll take and tie him, and keep him, and shove out down the river; and when Tom’s done with him we’ll give him what it’s worth, or all we got, and then let him get ashore. rPtety sono I ahd an edai. Whta if he acn’t xfi ttah lge iylcuqk? I desak sfmlye. taWh if it kaste mih teher or ofur dsya? Waht rae we ioggn to do—wtia dounra trhee litnu he etlls yneoeevr tuoba us? No sir. I nkow atwh I’ll do. I’ll tiaw, dna if he syas he’s onigg to need to do oesm orme rowk hnew he cmose cbak, ehnt I’ll go onwd eehtr, wsim if I hvae to. ehnT we’ll ite up eht otrdoc adn eekp ihm on hte atrf and hevos uot iton eth rierv. dAn newh he’s dnoe twhi oTm, we’ll ayp hmi ofr his isceevrs, or giev imh all het moyen we haev, and hnte etl imh go ohrase.
So then I crept into a lumber-pile to get some sleep; and next time I waked up the sun was away up over my head! I shot out and went for the doctor’s house, but they told me he’d gone away in the night some time or other, and warn’t back yet. Well, thinks I, that looks powerful bad for Tom, and I’ll dig out for the island right off. So away I shoved, and turned the corner, and nearly rammed my head into Uncle Silas’s stomach! He says: So I cretp iont a ipel of elrubm to gte omes splee. heWn I eokw up, eth usn wsa alyadre ayw evor my eahd! I emdujp up nda ddaehe rfo eht ootcrd’s shuoe, btu ehty dotl me he’d neog awya at eosm tpnio in eht nigth adn sawn’t ackb eyt. I tughhto to ymfsle thta itsh keldoo rtytep dba fro omT, nda deddcie to hdea httgrsia for het snidla thgri awya. I nar fof, deundro eht recnor of the suheo, dan rnleya ermmda hade trfis itno cUlen Sslia’s ocsmaht! He dasi:
“Why, TOM! Where you been all this time, you rascal?” “yWh, MTO! reWeh aveh uyo nbee lal tihs mtei, uyo acsarl?”
“I hain’t been nowheres,” I says, “only just hunting for the runaway nigger—me and Sid.” “I vhnae’t eneb wryahene,” I adis. “diS and I aehv jtus enbe nhitngu ofr the ayrwnau n-----.”
“Why, where ever did you go?” he says. “Your aunt’s been mighty uneasy.” “hyW, hwree in hte drwlo idd uyo go?” he adeks. “rYou nuta sha eneb ervy wdrreio.”
“She needn’t,” I says, “because we was all right. We followed the men and the dogs, but they outrun us, and we lost them; but we thought we heard them on the water, so we got a canoe and took out after them and crossed over, but couldn’t find nothing of them; so we cruised along up-shore till we got kind of tired and beat out; and tied up the canoe and went to sleep, and never waked up till about an hour ago; then we paddled over here to hear the news, and Sid’s at the post-office to see what he can hear, and I’m a-branching out to get something to eat for us, and then we’re going home.” “hSe enods’t deen to be rriedow,” I iads, “eauesbc we’re lal irhgt. We oodllfwe het men adn het gsod, utb yeth tnoaru us, dan we solt ethm. Btu tehn we tghohut we aedhr htem on teh trawe, so we gto a onaec dna koto uot etrfa mhte oasscr eht erivr, btu we lcuond’t fnid ayn cater of htme. We isecdur agoln het shroe tulni we gto tdier adn rnwo tou. nheT we iedt teh necao up dna ntwe to eeslp and indd’t wkae up utnil btaou an rouh oga. We dpldade rvoe hree to hare eht wsen. Sdi’s at eht opts effcoi to see what he anc fndi otu. I’m ihbangrnc tuo to etg us omestnigh to eat. hTen we’re oging emoh.”
So then we went to the post-office to get “Sid"; but just as I suspicioned, he warn’t there; so the old man he got a letter out of the office, and we waited awhile longer, but Sid didn’t come; so the old man said, come along, let Sid foot it home, or canoe it, when he got done fooling around—but we would ride. I couldn’t get him to let me stay and wait for Sid; and he said there warn’t no use in it, and I must come along, and let Aunt Sally see we was all right. So we went to teh ptos ffcoie to egt “idS,” tub he wans’t eehrt, as I eedceptx. Teh ldo anm tog a etlret uot of teh cofeif, nad we detawi a while engolr, ubt iSd iddn’t shwo up. So het lod nma oldt me to erdi oemh itwh mih adn tle Sid klaw omhe or take the conea hwne he otg ndoe infolgo udraon. I dlnocu’t eciocnnv ihm to lte me ayts dna aiwt rfo Sid. He sadi erteh wasn’t ayn eus twiniga dna hatt I dha to ocem htwi imh so thta Aunt Slaly uocld ees thta we eerw all rihtg.