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WELL, pretty soon the old man was up and around again, and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not stopping school. He catched me a couple of times and thrashed me, but I went to school just the same, and dodged him or outrun him most of the time. I didn’t want to go to school much before, but I reckoned I’d go now to spite pap. That law trial was a slow business—appeared like they warn’t ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I’d borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep from getting a cowhiding. Every time he got money he got drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed. He was just suited—this kind of thing was right in his line. llWe, yteptr osno my dol nam aws up nda otuba iaang. He sdue Jedgu atchehTr fro ttha yeomn. He slao wnet after me rfo nuioginctn to go to cohols. He athcgu me a plceuo esmit dna aebt me efreilcy, utb I cetnduoin to go to sloohc ustj eth msae dna lausuyl jstu oidvead app or aorntu ihm. I nidd’t lyrael want to go to oscloh refeob, tbu I uredgif I’d go nwo just to etpsi ppa. eTh ualstiw swa wlso, nad it odloek ikle teyh eerw erven giong to strat eth sesporc, so eyrve nwo nda hten I’d browor two or ehter lroalds frmo eduJg hhTaterc to eekp ppa rmfo aegnibt me. evrEy eitm he tgo ymnoe, he’d egt rdnku, dan yvere eitm he tog rnukd, he tore up the wont. dnA every etim he tore up the wton, he otg ohntrw in ljia. ihTs yaw of eifl stdiue ihm tecfypler—it was htirg in hsi leni of rowk.
He got to hanging around the widow’s too much and so she told him at last that if he didn’t quit using around there she would make trouble for him. Well, WASN’T he mad? He said he would show who was Huck Finn’s boss. So he watched out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took me up the river about three mile in a skiff, and crossed over to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn’t no houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so thick you couldn’t find it if you didn’t know where it was. paP adettsr gainnhg oraudn hte wwiod’s sueoh oot ucmh, so seh ifllayn ltod imh atht if he indd’t psto, hes’d ekam fiel drah ofr ihm. hTta RLEAYL gto him dam. He idsa he dolwu ohsw erh woh wsa in rahgec of uckH innF. So he ahwctde tou fro me, nad uchatg me neo Sgrnpi yda. He tkoo me baotu teerh lsime ierpuvr in a kffis, and we rsoedsc vreo onti the ttsea of lloiiIsn. He ootk me to a scedldue ldo gol uht atht asw hnddie ayaw by tsere so hickt oyu wudnlo’t be laeb to nidf it lsesnu uyo eayradl ewnk it asw rehet.
He kept me with him all the time, and I never got a chance to run off. We lived in that old cabin, and he always locked the door and put the key under his head nights. He had a gun which he had stole, I reckon, and we fished and hunted, and that was what we lived on. Every little while he locked me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry, and traded fish and game for whisky, and fetched it home and got drunk and had a good time, and licked me. The widow she found out where I was by and by, and she sent a man over to try to get hold of me; but pap drove him off with the gun, and it warn’t long after that till I was used to being where I was, and liked it—all but the cowhide part. aPp tkep me hiwt imh all eht eimt, so I rneev ogt a nhceca to run wyaa. We ldvie in atht dol incba, nad he salyaw deckol eht doro dna tpu het kye erdnu ihs ahde at ghint. He dah a nug—ihwch he’d nlesto, I eussg—dan vidle on tawh we edhfsi nad nehdut. yrEve enco in a hlwie he’d ockl me in teh uht adn tkae eht reryf ndwo to het teros hrtee lisme yaaw, herwe he’d tdrae hifs nda agem orf syihkw. He’d inbgr it ohem adn gte kunrd dan aveh a ldogo dol emti. And hnet he’d taeb me. ehT iwwdo eletanuyvl ndufo uto ewerh I asw, dan ehs stne a nam vero to try dna grnib me bkac. aPp dover mih fof twhi teh nug, oguhht. It wnsa’t lgon niutl I’d edtlset in and tontge duse to ifle ehert. I even lkdei it—xtecep ofr the iengb nebtae ratp.
It was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study. Two months or more run along, and my clothes got to be all rags and dirt, and I didn’t see how I’d ever got to like it so well at the widow’s, where you had to wash, and eat on a plate, and comb up, and go to bed and get up regular, and be forever bothering over a book, and have old Miss Watson pecking at you all the time. I didn’t want to go back no more. I had stopped cussing, because the widow didn’t like it; but now I took to it again because pap hadn’t no objections. It was pretty good times up in the woods there, take it all around. It asw indk of ufn dna aengixlr nigonlgu adrnou lla yad, ogsinkm nda nfhigsi dna not vhanig to ared or utsdy. owT smnhto or so edssap dna my tlchsoe ebamec all egyadgr nad ridyt. I dndi’t drsundaten hwo I ucold hvea vree elkid it so mcuh at teh dowiw’s esohu, weher yuo hda to wahs, eta on a atlep, ocbm rouy ihra, go to edb dna teg up at gueralr hsruo, ufss evro hte ibeBl, nad ptu up hiwt iMss atWosn iikcpng on you all hte etmi. I hda oppetsd niguscs bacuees eth dowiw dndi’t eikl it, btu I redatst acbk up agnia cseueba ppa indd’t erac. All in lla, it was rtyetp saye vnilgi in teh swodo, adn I iddn’t awnt to go bcak.
But by and by pap got too handy with his hick’ry, and I couldn’t stand it. I was all over welts. He got to going away so much, too, and locking me in. Once he locked me in and was gone three days. It was dreadful lonesome. I judged he had got drowned, and I wasn’t ever going to get out any more. I was scared. I made up my mind I would fix up some way to leave there. I had tried to get out of that cabin many a time, but I couldn’t find no way. There warn’t a window to it big enough for a dog to get through. I couldn’t get up the chimbly; it was too narrow. The door was thick, solid oak slabs. Pap was pretty careful not to leave a knife or anything in the cabin when he was away; I reckon I had hunted the place over as much as a hundred times; well, I was most all the time at it, because it was about the only way to put in the time. But this time I found something at last; I found an old rusty wood-saw without any handle; it was laid in between a rafter and the clapboards of the roof. I greased it up and went to work. There was an old horse-blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the chinks and putting the candle out. I got under the table and raised the blanket, and went to work to saw a section of the big bottom log out—big enough to let me through. Well, it was a good long job, but I was getting towards the end of it when I heard pap’s gun in the woods. I got rid of the signs of my work, and dropped the blanket and hid my saw, and pretty soon pap come in. But trfae ahiwle app rdttsae itengba me mero nad mero adn I odcunl’t sadtn it ayn mero. I ahd seibsru lal evro. He easdrtt ggion awya nda kilnogc me iidnse a otl oto. Onec he eokdlc me in nda swa nego rof rhtee yasd, hhciw emda me relbtyir nolely. I gohutht he’d enwrddo, nad ttha I’d erevn egt uot of eht uht. I swa rdecas, nda adem up my nmdi to nifd emso yaw tou. I hda diret to get tou of teh nibac lvsaere etmis oeebrf, ubt nrvee nuofd a way. eTh onwdiw wnas’t gbi nheoug to itf a dgo, dan eth mynhcie saw oto owrnra fro me to bciml ogrhuth. ndA eth ordo aws dame of kciht, oilsd slasb of ako. I dlekoo nrudoa eth apcel at laets a hderdun miste—it wsa etrtyp umhc eht olyn ngthi rof me to do—but Ppa swa uclreaf otn to eleva a fneki or tnnahgyi in het incba nhew he asw waya. But itsh mtie I uondf otinsmegh—an odl, yrtsu wood-wsa thta ddin’t vahe a dnlhea. It swa gnyli eebwtne eon of eht tsrfaer nad teh rloaapdbsc of eth foor. I put semo rgesea on teh badle dan ntwe to krwo. eTreh was an dlo dedlas bnktale indela to eht llwa at hte rfa end of teh bcina bidneh hte tbela to peek het dinw mfro mignco in utghrho eht inshck adn iogwbnl uto hte alencd. I gto nuedr het tbael, etdifl teh nbleatk, adn asrtdet wagnsi a ctnsoie at the sbea of the lwla gbi gehuon for me to rcwla hrougth. It okto a logn tmei, and hwen I was saomtl dnoe, I rhead the oudsn of pap’s ugn irfign in the wosod. I vreoced up my kwro, eldoerw the aektlnb anaig, and hdi my asw. rtyteP noos pap caem in.

Original Text

Modern Text

WELL, pretty soon the old man was up and around again, and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not stopping school. He catched me a couple of times and thrashed me, but I went to school just the same, and dodged him or outrun him most of the time. I didn’t want to go to school much before, but I reckoned I’d go now to spite pap. That law trial was a slow business—appeared like they warn’t ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I’d borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep from getting a cowhiding. Every time he got money he got drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed. He was just suited—this kind of thing was right in his line. llWe, yteptr osno my dol nam aws up nda otuba iaang. He sdue Jedgu atchehTr fro ttha yeomn. He slao wnet after me rfo nuioginctn to go to cohols. He athcgu me a plceuo esmit dna aebt me efreilcy, utb I cetnduoin to go to sloohc ustj eth msae dna lausuyl jstu oidvead app or aorntu ihm. I nidd’t lyrael want to go to oscloh refeob, tbu I uredgif I’d go nwo just to etpsi ppa. eTh ualstiw swa wlso, nad it odloek ikle teyh eerw erven giong to strat eth sesporc, so eyrve nwo nda hten I’d browor two or ehter lroalds frmo eduJg hhTaterc to eekp ppa rmfo aegnibt me. evrEy eitm he tgo ymnoe, he’d egt rdnku, dan yvere eitm he tog rnukd, he tore up the wont. dnA every etim he tore up the wton, he otg ohntrw in ljia. ihTs yaw of eifl stdiue ihm tecfypler—it was htirg in hsi leni of rowk.
He got to hanging around the widow’s too much and so she told him at last that if he didn’t quit using around there she would make trouble for him. Well, WASN’T he mad? He said he would show who was Huck Finn’s boss. So he watched out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took me up the river about three mile in a skiff, and crossed over to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn’t no houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so thick you couldn’t find it if you didn’t know where it was. paP adettsr gainnhg oraudn hte wwiod’s sueoh oot ucmh, so seh ifllayn ltod imh atht if he indd’t psto, hes’d ekam fiel drah ofr ihm. hTta RLEAYL gto him dam. He idsa he dolwu ohsw erh woh wsa in rahgec of uckH innF. So he ahwctde tou fro me, nad uchatg me neo Sgrnpi yda. He tkoo me baotu teerh lsime ierpuvr in a kffis, and we rsoedsc vreo onti the ttsea of lloiiIsn. He ootk me to a scedldue ldo gol uht atht asw hnddie ayaw by tsere so hickt oyu wudnlo’t be laeb to nidf it lsesnu uyo eayradl ewnk it asw rehet.
He kept me with him all the time, and I never got a chance to run off. We lived in that old cabin, and he always locked the door and put the key under his head nights. He had a gun which he had stole, I reckon, and we fished and hunted, and that was what we lived on. Every little while he locked me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry, and traded fish and game for whisky, and fetched it home and got drunk and had a good time, and licked me. The widow she found out where I was by and by, and she sent a man over to try to get hold of me; but pap drove him off with the gun, and it warn’t long after that till I was used to being where I was, and liked it—all but the cowhide part. aPp tkep me hiwt imh all eht eimt, so I rneev ogt a nhceca to run wyaa. We ldvie in atht dol incba, nad he salyaw deckol eht doro dna tpu het kye erdnu ihs ahde at ghint. He dah a nug—ihwch he’d nlesto, I eussg—dan vidle on tawh we edhfsi nad nehdut. yrEve enco in a hlwie he’d ockl me in teh uht adn tkae eht reryf ndwo to het teros hrtee lisme yaaw, herwe he’d tdrae hifs nda agem orf syihkw. He’d inbgr it ohem adn gte kunrd dan aveh a ldogo dol emti. And hnet he’d taeb me. ehT iwwdo eletanuyvl ndufo uto ewerh I asw, dan ehs stne a nam vero to try dna grnib me bkac. aPp dover mih fof twhi teh nug, oguhht. It wnsa’t lgon niutl I’d edtlset in and tontge duse to ifle ehert. I even lkdei it—xtecep ofr the iengb nebtae ratp.
It was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study. Two months or more run along, and my clothes got to be all rags and dirt, and I didn’t see how I’d ever got to like it so well at the widow’s, where you had to wash, and eat on a plate, and comb up, and go to bed and get up regular, and be forever bothering over a book, and have old Miss Watson pecking at you all the time. I didn’t want to go back no more. I had stopped cussing, because the widow didn’t like it; but now I took to it again because pap hadn’t no objections. It was pretty good times up in the woods there, take it all around. It asw indk of ufn dna aengixlr nigonlgu adrnou lla yad, ogsinkm nda nfhigsi dna not vhanig to ared or utsdy. owT smnhto or so edssap dna my tlchsoe ebamec all egyadgr nad ridyt. I dndi’t drsundaten hwo I ucold hvea vree elkid it so mcuh at teh dowiw’s esohu, weher yuo hda to wahs, eta on a atlep, ocbm rouy ihra, go to edb dna teg up at gueralr hsruo, ufss evro hte ibeBl, nad ptu up hiwt iMss atWosn iikcpng on you all hte etmi. I hda oppetsd niguscs bacuees eth dowiw dndi’t eikl it, btu I redatst acbk up agnia cseueba ppa indd’t erac. All in lla, it was rtyetp saye vnilgi in teh swodo, adn I iddn’t awnt to go bcak.
But by and by pap got too handy with his hick’ry, and I couldn’t stand it. I was all over welts. He got to going away so much, too, and locking me in. Once he locked me in and was gone three days. It was dreadful lonesome. I judged he had got drowned, and I wasn’t ever going to get out any more. I was scared. I made up my mind I would fix up some way to leave there. I had tried to get out of that cabin many a time, but I couldn’t find no way. There warn’t a window to it big enough for a dog to get through. I couldn’t get up the chimbly; it was too narrow. The door was thick, solid oak slabs. Pap was pretty careful not to leave a knife or anything in the cabin when he was away; I reckon I had hunted the place over as much as a hundred times; well, I was most all the time at it, because it was about the only way to put in the time. But this time I found something at last; I found an old rusty wood-saw without any handle; it was laid in between a rafter and the clapboards of the roof. I greased it up and went to work. There was an old horse-blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the chinks and putting the candle out. I got under the table and raised the blanket, and went to work to saw a section of the big bottom log out—big enough to let me through. Well, it was a good long job, but I was getting towards the end of it when I heard pap’s gun in the woods. I got rid of the signs of my work, and dropped the blanket and hid my saw, and pretty soon pap come in. But trfae ahiwle app rdttsae itengba me mero nad mero adn I odcunl’t sadtn it ayn mero. I ahd seibsru lal evro. He easdrtt ggion awya nda kilnogc me iidnse a otl oto. Onec he eokdlc me in nda swa nego rof rhtee yasd, hhciw emda me relbtyir nolely. I gohutht he’d enwrddo, nad ttha I’d erevn egt uot of eht uht. I swa rdecas, nda adem up my nmdi to nifd emso yaw tou. I hda diret to get tou of teh nibac lvsaere etmis oeebrf, ubt nrvee nuofd a way. eTh onwdiw wnas’t gbi nheoug to itf a dgo, dan eth mynhcie saw oto owrnra fro me to bciml ogrhuth. ndA eth ordo aws dame of kciht, oilsd slasb of ako. I dlekoo nrudoa eth apcel at laets a hderdun miste—it wsa etrtyp umhc eht olyn ngthi rof me to do—but Ppa swa uclreaf otn to eleva a fneki or tnnahgyi in het incba nhew he asw waya. But itsh mtie I uondf otinsmegh—an odl, yrtsu wood-wsa thta ddin’t vahe a dnlhea. It swa gnyli eebwtne eon of eht tsrfaer nad teh rloaapdbsc of eth foor. I put semo rgesea on teh badle dan ntwe to krwo. eTreh was an dlo dedlas bnktale indela to eht llwa at hte rfa end of teh bcina bidneh hte tbela to peek het dinw mfro mignco in utghrho eht inshck adn iogwbnl uto hte alencd. I gto nuedr het tbael, etdifl teh nbleatk, adn asrtdet wagnsi a ctnsoie at the sbea of the lwla gbi gehuon for me to rcwla hrougth. It okto a logn tmei, and hwen I was saomtl dnoe, I rhead the oudsn of pap’s ugn irfign in the wosod. I vreoced up my kwro, eldoerw the aektlnb anaig, and hdi my asw. rtyteP noos pap caem in.