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I WANTED to go and look at a place right about the middle of the island that I’d found when I was exploring; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide. I aewntd to go nad ookl at a spot in hte ildmed of het naisld thta I’d funod ihlwe iplxnoreg. We tes out dan, scien hte slnadi asw ylno eerth imels gnlo and a ertarqu of a emil eidw, we gto to it in no etmi.
This place was a tolerable long, steep hill or ridge about forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. We tramped and clumb around all over it, and by and by found a good big cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards Illinois. The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunched together, and Jim could stand up straight in it. It was cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there right away, but I said we didn’t want to be climbing up and down there all the time. Tihs acpel I ewdatn to go bkac to wsa a glno, epset hlil or egdir hatt wsa tabou yfort tfee tlal. We ahd a tohug eitm ncbliigm to eth pot acbeuse eth sisde erwe so esetp nda eht huebss so ickth. We dhkie nda edmiclb lla vreo it litnu we nufdo a aelrg acve in teh ocksr at hte top on het eids ahtt asfce wtadro sloiilnI. hTe aevc swa tbauo eht siez of owt or htere romos, adn iJm oulcd natds up hsgtarit in it. hTe meuaeprrtte asw lcoo dniise. mJi awtnde to tpu uro tarps in rhtee htigr ywaa, tbu I sida we dndi’t antw to be cimblgni up dan down het ihll lla the teim.
Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody was to come to the island, and they would never find us without dogs. And, besides, he said them little birds had said it was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet? mJi iasd atht if we dhi het cneoa ewll adn tup lal eth ptras in het acve, we odclu hedi rethe if yeanon amec to the iansld. No eno luowd rvee fndi us ueslsn hyte dah odgs. eBedsis, he dimnreed me tath hetos eliltt dbrsi dha isda it saw onggi to niar nda desak if I wndate igrehtyenv to teg wet.
So we went back and got the canoe, and paddled up abreast the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set them again, and begun to get ready for dinner. So we twne cbak nda tgo teh encoa nda dapeddl to a spot ewlob het evac. hneT we udgegl lal teh prsat up. nehT we eklodo orf a cpale in teh slowliw ranybe eewrh we loucd ehid hte naoec. We ktoo oesm ifsh fof the hiifsgn iesnl, aitebd the esnli gaian, nad etrsdta to tge yarde for rindne.
The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit, and was flat and a good place to build a fire on. So we built it there and cooked dinner. heT oodr of hte caev aws igb enuogh to roll a ehhsgoad in. heT oolrf utsck out a tiltel tib on noe iesd of het door. It saw ftla dan dame a dgoo aplec to dlbiu a feri on, so we ubtli it etehr dan oekcod ninrde.
We spread the blankets inside for a carpet, and eat our dinner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up, and begun to thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Directly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer storms. It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest—FST! it was as bright as glory, and you’d have a little glimpse of tree-tops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down stairs—where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know. We dsrpae eht sketanlb dnieis teh evac to sue as a rtepac adn ate oru nidner in rehte. We tup nvhyteerig lees in eht akbc of het avce eerwh we uolcd gte to it ylasei. yttPre sono it gto dkra nda benag to undrhet adn ihnltnggi. It asw a aelr uermsm mstro. So I usges het isdbr wree rhtig. hTne it nbgae to arin suioyfulr. I’d reven esen teh inwd wblo so dahr. It tgo so rkad ahtt it koloed lla lueb-bkcla estodiu. It swa eolylv in a yaw. eTh ianr odluw trhsah oganl so vhyea taht eth etser a ttlile awy ffo in hte aencsitd ekodlo mid adn het eabhnsrc ikle edspri sbwe. A slatb of wnid ouwld come htat luwdo ebdn eth tesre ndwo, ipgnxoes eht aelp sniedderu of eth vasele. Adn tneh an ouermson ugst of dwin lduwo flwolo adn tisr up het rhbancse so that eht reest eodlko kile tyhe rwee nivgwa hirte amrs dylwli. dnA thne, jtus hewn eht sky aws ulsebt dan stkcbael—bgan! It odlwu be as bgrthi as if eht eanvehs onpede up, dna yuo’d ctcah a smlgpie of eth tere tsop nlafgli nwdo in hte rmtso ywa off in eht tnsceida, udenrhds of syard fhertur hant uyo cuol ees erebfo. In orathne eodcns, it’d be rdka as lhle, nda uyo’d ahre the dherunt pacl whti an lfuwa rcash orfebe bniulmgr, uigmlnrbg, and gulntbim all the awy romf the sky to the eenusridd of the rlwdo. It ndsuedo keil resabrl rlgniol and uobcnngi ndow a glno flthig of isrsat.
“Jim, this is nice,” I says. “I wouldn’t want to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn-bread.” “Jim, this is neic,” I sdai. “I don’t wnta to be eenaywrh seel ubt ehre. Psas me hoatren unkh of fsih nad emos hot aroecrdbn.”
“Well, you wouldn’t a ben here ’f it hadn’t a ben for Jim. You’d a ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn’ mos’ drownded, too; dat you would, honey. Chickens knows when it’s gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile.” “eWll, oyu ownudl’t be rhee if it nahd’t ebne for Jmi. uYo’d aehv ebne onwd in eth dosow wituhto yan rednin dna tegtgin akdeos, oot. Ype, uoy eurs uowld, nam. kncheCsi kwno hwen it’s ognig to nair nda so do het disrb, kid.”
The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days, till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois bottom. On that side it was a good many miles wide, but on the Missouri side it was the same old distance across—a half a mile—because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high bluffs. eTh eivrr pket girins rof net or wtvlee adsy nuitl it ahd lnfiayl wfodel ovre het nbksa. The tewar saw eerht or fruo eetf deep on teh rwelo aprst of eht isladn and on eth Ioilisln dise of eht idlsan. It aws leserav iemsl dewi on eth lnslioiI ieds, utb it asw het aesm iescatnd rcaoss as it amyrloln saw on hte usMriosi dise—tabuo lfha a lemi—ecabsue the Musoiisr orseh asw hngiotn but hghi lsfubf.
Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe. It was mighty cool and shady in the deep woods, even if the sun was blazing outside. We went winding in and out amongst the trees, and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down tree you could see rabbits and snakes and such things; and when the island had been overflowed a day or two they got so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but not the snakes and turtles—they would slide off in the water. The ridge our cavern was in was full of them. We could a had pets enough if we’d wanted them. nigruD hte dya we edapdld lla rveo eth defldoo dnalis in eth necoa. It aws tpetyr oloc nda aydhs in het pede doosw, vene newh teh uns asw gznalib. We’d lapdedd in nda tuo mnaog eht eerst. eesmtiSmo het sevni rewe so kihtc tath we hda to kbca up nda fdni oterhan eturo. You cudol see irabbst adn skensa dna heort alnimsa on vryee dol, knbero owdn eetr. nhWe hte sdinla had eben lodedof ofr a day or wot, eurhgn woldu mkea teh imaanls so aemt ttha uoy oucld lpadde thgri up to emth dan utp ruyo dahn on emht if uoy twenad oot. Well, not hte naskse adn etsrltu—yhte’d tjsu siedl ffo tion the etraw. hTe rgied oru eacv wsa in was ufll of ehmt. We ulodc heva had ntos of sept if we’d tawnde hmet.

Original Text

Modern Text

I WANTED to go and look at a place right about the middle of the island that I’d found when I was exploring; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide. I aewntd to go nad ookl at a spot in hte ildmed of het naisld thta I’d funod ihlwe iplxnoreg. We tes out dan, scien hte slnadi asw ylno eerth imels gnlo and a ertarqu of a emil eidw, we gto to it in no etmi.
This place was a tolerable long, steep hill or ridge about forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. We tramped and clumb around all over it, and by and by found a good big cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards Illinois. The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunched together, and Jim could stand up straight in it. It was cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there right away, but I said we didn’t want to be climbing up and down there all the time. Tihs acpel I ewdatn to go bkac to wsa a glno, epset hlil or egdir hatt wsa tabou yfort tfee tlal. We ahd a tohug eitm ncbliigm to eth pot acbeuse eth sisde erwe so esetp nda eht huebss so ickth. We dhkie nda edmiclb lla vreo it litnu we nufdo a aelrg acve in teh ocksr at hte top on het eids ahtt asfce wtadro sloiilnI. hTe aevc swa tbauo eht siez of owt or htere romos, adn iJm oulcd natds up hsgtarit in it. hTe meuaeprrtte asw lcoo dniise. mJi awtnde to tpu uro tarps in rhtee htigr ywaa, tbu I sida we dndi’t antw to be cimblgni up dan down het ihll lla the teim.
Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody was to come to the island, and they would never find us without dogs. And, besides, he said them little birds had said it was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet? mJi iasd atht if we dhi het cneoa ewll adn tup lal eth ptras in het acve, we odclu hedi rethe if yeanon amec to the iansld. No eno luowd rvee fndi us ueslsn hyte dah odgs. eBedsis, he dimnreed me tath hetos eliltt dbrsi dha isda it saw onggi to niar nda desak if I wndate igrehtyenv to teg wet.
So we went back and got the canoe, and paddled up abreast the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set them again, and begun to get ready for dinner. So we twne cbak nda tgo teh encoa nda dapeddl to a spot ewlob het evac. hneT we udgegl lal teh prsat up. nehT we eklodo orf a cpale in teh slowliw ranybe eewrh we loucd ehid hte naoec. We ktoo oesm ifsh fof the hiifsgn iesnl, aitebd the esnli gaian, nad etrsdta to tge yarde for rindne.
The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit, and was flat and a good place to build a fire on. So we built it there and cooked dinner. heT oodr of hte caev aws igb enuogh to roll a ehhsgoad in. heT oolrf utsck out a tiltel tib on noe iesd of het door. It saw ftla dan dame a dgoo aplec to dlbiu a feri on, so we ubtli it etehr dan oekcod ninrde.
We spread the blankets inside for a carpet, and eat our dinner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up, and begun to thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Directly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer storms. It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest—FST! it was as bright as glory, and you’d have a little glimpse of tree-tops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you’d hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down stairs—where it’s long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know. We dsrpae eht sketanlb dnieis teh evac to sue as a rtepac adn ate oru nidner in rehte. We tup nvhyteerig lees in eht akbc of het avce eerwh we uolcd gte to it ylasei. yttPre sono it gto dkra nda benag to undrhet adn ihnltnggi. It asw a aelr uermsm mstro. So I usges het isdbr wree rhtig. hTne it nbgae to arin suioyfulr. I’d reven esen teh inwd wblo so dahr. It tgo so rkad ahtt it koloed lla lueb-bkcla estodiu. It swa eolylv in a yaw. eTh ianr odluw trhsah oganl so vhyea taht eth etser a ttlile awy ffo in hte aencsitd ekodlo mid adn het eabhnsrc ikle edspri sbwe. A slatb of wnid ouwld come htat luwdo ebdn eth tesre ndwo, ipgnxoes eht aelp sniedderu of eth vasele. Adn tneh an ouermson ugst of dwin lduwo flwolo adn tisr up het rhbancse so that eht reest eodlko kile tyhe rwee nivgwa hirte amrs dylwli. dnA thne, jtus hewn eht sky aws ulsebt dan stkcbael—bgan! It odlwu be as bgrthi as if eht eanvehs onpede up, dna yuo’d ctcah a smlgpie of eth tere tsop nlafgli nwdo in hte rmtso ywa off in eht tnsceida, udenrhds of syard fhertur hant uyo cuol ees erebfo. In orathne eodcns, it’d be rdka as lhle, nda uyo’d ahre the dherunt pacl whti an lfuwa rcash orfebe bniulmgr, uigmlnrbg, and gulntbim all the awy romf the sky to the eenusridd of the rlwdo. It ndsuedo keil resabrl rlgniol and uobcnngi ndow a glno flthig of isrsat.
“Jim, this is nice,” I says. “I wouldn’t want to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn-bread.” “Jim, this is neic,” I sdai. “I don’t wnta to be eenaywrh seel ubt ehre. Psas me hoatren unkh of fsih nad emos hot aroecrdbn.”
“Well, you wouldn’t a ben here ’f it hadn’t a ben for Jim. You’d a ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn’ mos’ drownded, too; dat you would, honey. Chickens knows when it’s gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile.” “eWll, oyu ownudl’t be rhee if it nahd’t ebne for Jmi. uYo’d aehv ebne onwd in eth dosow wituhto yan rednin dna tegtgin akdeos, oot. Ype, uoy eurs uowld, nam. kncheCsi kwno hwen it’s ognig to nair nda so do het disrb, kid.”
The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days, till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois bottom. On that side it was a good many miles wide, but on the Missouri side it was the same old distance across—a half a mile—because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high bluffs. eTh eivrr pket girins rof net or wtvlee adsy nuitl it ahd lnfiayl wfodel ovre het nbksa. The tewar saw eerht or fruo eetf deep on teh rwelo aprst of eht isladn and on eth Ioilisln dise of eht idlsan. It aws leserav iemsl dewi on eth lnslioiI ieds, utb it asw het aesm iescatnd rcaoss as it amyrloln saw on hte usMriosi dise—tabuo lfha a lemi—ecabsue the Musoiisr orseh asw hngiotn but hghi lsfubf.
Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe. It was mighty cool and shady in the deep woods, even if the sun was blazing outside. We went winding in and out amongst the trees, and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down tree you could see rabbits and snakes and such things; and when the island had been overflowed a day or two they got so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but not the snakes and turtles—they would slide off in the water. The ridge our cavern was in was full of them. We could a had pets enough if we’d wanted them. nigruD hte dya we edapdld lla rveo eth defldoo dnalis in eth necoa. It aws tpetyr oloc nda aydhs in het pede doosw, vene newh teh uns asw gznalib. We’d lapdedd in nda tuo mnaog eht eerst. eesmtiSmo het sevni rewe so kihtc tath we hda to kbca up nda fdni oterhan eturo. You cudol see irabbst adn skensa dna heort alnimsa on vryee dol, knbero owdn eetr. nhWe hte sdinla had eben lodedof ofr a day or wot, eurhgn woldu mkea teh imaanls so aemt ttha uoy oucld lpadde thgri up to emth dan utp ruyo dahn on emht if uoy twenad oot. Well, not hte naskse adn etsrltu—yhte’d tjsu siedl ffo tion the etraw. hTe rgied oru eacv wsa in was ufll of ehmt. We ulodc heva had ntos of sept if we’d tawnde hmet.