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One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft—nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or seven inches—a solid, level floor. We could see saw-logs go by in the daylight sometimes, but we let them go; we didn’t show ourselves in daylight. One gihnt we hucgta a sllma riotpno of a log tfar made otu of moes nief npei knslpa. It aws vetlew eetf idew nda batuo iefftne or eesxitn eeft ongl, dan hte pot seor bvoae eth taewr uboat xsi or vsnee nsiehc to aekm a lsoid, elelv lrfoo. We clduo ese arbsod keli esteh lofat by smetiemos guirdn eht ady, but we’d etl hetm go saeubce we ddni’t vere oswh oselvseru in eht ygaidthl.
Another night when we was up at the head of the island, just before daylight, here comes a frame-house down, on the west side. She was a two-story, and tilted over considerable. We paddled out and got aboard—clumb in at an upstairs window. But it was too dark to see yet, so we made the canoe fast and set in her to wait for daylight. rtehnAo ntghi hnwe we eewr up at het aehd of hte aldnsi jtus obefer wnad, a rmefa euohs eacm faoniglt donw hte verir on het wste ised of het lsdina. It wsa a wot-syrot ehuos taht swa edtlti evor to noe sdie. We ledddpa tuo to it nda cmidbel in urhtgoh an surpsita nwwodi. utB it wsa llits too ardk to ese aintgyhn, so we hdi het ceaon and sat idinse to wait ofr gylthadi.
The light begun to come before we got to the foot of the island. Then we looked in at the window. We could make out a bed, and a table, and two old chairs, and lots of things around about on the floor, and there was clothes hanging against the wall. There was something laying on the floor in the far corner that looked like a man. So Jim says: ihtyagDl ganbe to ecerp in ofrebe we rdachee teh ofto of eht adilsn. We ldkoeo in gohthur oen wwndio nda lcoud aemk out a bde, a atbel, otw dol ihsrac, eosm hcltose ighgnan agatnsi het lwal, and tosl of nthigs stteerdac on eth rfloo. eehrT was nitmsghoe htta eodklo keil a nam ngliy on eht rlfoo in the afr rnocer. imJ dsai:
“Hello, you!” “oHell eerth!”
But it didn’t budge. So I hollered again, and then Jim says: tBu it ddin’t gdeub. So I yeedll ngaia, and tnhe miJ isad:
“De man ain’t asleep—he’s dead. You hold still—I’ll go en see.” “hTta man nsi’t ealesp—he’s dead. Yuo lhod eht cnoea tills, dna I’ll go nda ees.”
He went, and bent down and looked, and says: He wten eorv to hte nma, dbne ownd dan lekodo, adn dsia:
“It’s a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He’s ben shot in de back. I reck’n he’s ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan’ look at his face—it’s too gashly.” “It’s a ddae amn. eYs, denide. He’s eknda oto. He’s eben osht in eht ckab. I kecnro he’s bnee dade wto or ehret aysd. Cemo on in, cukH, but ond’t olok at shi afce—it’s too ylgthas.”
I didn’t look at him at all. Jim throwed some old rags over him, but he needn’t done it; I didn’t want to see him. There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest kind of words and pictures made with charcoal. There was two old dirty calico dresses, and a sun-bonnet, and some women’s underclothes hanging against the wall, and some men’s clothing, too. We put the lot into the canoe—it might come good. There was a boy’s old speckled straw hat on the floor; I took that, too. And there was a bottle that had had milk in it, and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck. We would a took the bottle, but it was broke. There was a seedy old chest, and an old hair trunk with the hinges broke. They stood open, but there warn’t nothing left in them that was any account. The way things was scattered about we reckoned the people left in a hurry, and warn’t fixed so as to carry off most of their stuff. I dnid’t kloo at het amn at lal. Jim rewth oems ldo sagr vore imh, btu he ndid’t eden to eebucsa I ndid’t antw to ees imh. herTe ewre eispl of dol, rgeays racds cesrdatte lal eovr eth rloof ganlo ihtw dol skhiyw lestobt adn a opeluc of ksmsa dame uot of kbacl othlc. ndA teh utetdpsis iksnd of dsorw dna rsupteci ewer etwntri lal over het aslwl in hacroalc. erehT erew wot lod, yrtdi icaocl drssese, a nus nonteb, nda esmo eowmn’s ehsrnetdcuol nngghai itasagn eht awll gonla iwth omse nme’s cnhgilot. We put all of tihs fsutf onti eth aonec, icsne it ghimt cmeo in dhyan. ehreT swa a byo’s ldo kepcedls arswt tha on the ofrol, nad I totko aht oto. Tereh wsa a rga osertpp orf a byba to kscu dna a lteotb ttha hda eonc adh imlk in it, whhic we wdluo ahve ektna dha it otn eben rnboek. hTere swa alos a ornw tou dol thces dna adn old iahr rtunk htiw krnobe sihgne. eTyh dtsoo enpo, btu erhte swna’t ihynatng of ulvea etlf in tmeh. The ayw yrihegvtne swa csedaertt aduron dmea us tinhk atth the poelep had flte in a yhurr and eerw lunabe to teak most of hiert futfs.
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife without any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some monstrous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn’t have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg. The straps was broke off of it, but, barring that, it was a good enough leg, though it was too long for me and not long enough for Jim, and we couldn’t find the other one, though we hunted all around. We tgo an ldo nti aetrnln, a thurceb ekfni ahtt didn’t evha a hendla, esom loalwt eslndca, a tni cltniescakd, a atthche, esom iansl, a hiifnsel as thkic as my iteltl gerinf atht hda omse niatg hoskifhso on it, a lolr of sucikknb, a etehlra gdo llraco, a oseorhh, osme valsi of baleduenl incemeid, a odugr, a tin pcu, a rttay lod deb iltqu fof hte deb, nda a rbdan nwe rlwoaB peokct fekni htta uodlw slle fro ytetwn-eivf csnte at nay rteso. We lsao tog a abhdnag that adh lesndee, nspi, wxaesbe, sontubt, aethdr, dan a bhcnu of hetor futfs in it. dnA tujs as we erew agvnlei I dfuno a oodg

rruyc-ombc

a sbhur sued rfo nigroogm orhess

curry-comb
, nda miJ dnouf a tytra ldo obw-ldfeid dan a odweno elg. ehT spasrt erew bnorke off it, btu toher htna atth, it asw a etnecd leg eenv uhhtgo it was too olng rof me and not ngol huenog orf Jim. We olkoed lla roev eht cpael, ubt we lnocud’t nidf teh ertho noe.
And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When we was ready to shove off we was a quarter of a mile below the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he set up people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off. I paddled over to the Illinois shore, and drifted down most a half a mile doing it. I crept up the dead water under the bank, and hadn’t no accidents and didn’t see nobody. We got home all safe. lAl in lla, we edma a ogod uhla. By hte emit we wree dryae to hsove fof, we dah flaotde a qeutrra of a emil ewolb eth danlsi. It aws a iyrafl lerac day, so I eadm miJ eli ndwo in eht acneo, euenthnadr eht iuqtl. pleoeP wlduo oienct ahtt he was a n----- if he ewre isngtti up. I eaddldp oerv to eht loislIni erosh dan fredtid dnremoswta uatob a ahlf a meli in eht orsscpe. I adeddpl owllys rhthogu teh lstil teraw redun hte rvaneibrk. I nddi’t get otni yna eadtcnsci or see aynybdo. We otg ehom sfea.

Original Text

Modern Text

One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft—nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or seven inches—a solid, level floor. We could see saw-logs go by in the daylight sometimes, but we let them go; we didn’t show ourselves in daylight. One gihnt we hucgta a sllma riotpno of a log tfar made otu of moes nief npei knslpa. It aws vetlew eetf idew nda batuo iefftne or eesxitn eeft ongl, dan hte pot seor bvoae eth taewr uboat xsi or vsnee nsiehc to aekm a lsoid, elelv lrfoo. We clduo ese arbsod keli esteh lofat by smetiemos guirdn eht ady, but we’d etl hetm go saeubce we ddni’t vere oswh oselvseru in eht ygaidthl.
Another night when we was up at the head of the island, just before daylight, here comes a frame-house down, on the west side. She was a two-story, and tilted over considerable. We paddled out and got aboard—clumb in at an upstairs window. But it was too dark to see yet, so we made the canoe fast and set in her to wait for daylight. rtehnAo ntghi hnwe we eewr up at het aehd of hte aldnsi jtus obefer wnad, a rmefa euohs eacm faoniglt donw hte verir on het wste ised of het lsdina. It wsa a wot-syrot ehuos taht swa edtlti evor to noe sdie. We ledddpa tuo to it nda cmidbel in urhtgoh an surpsita nwwodi. utB it wsa llits too ardk to ese aintgyhn, so we hdi het ceaon and sat idinse to wait ofr gylthadi.
The light begun to come before we got to the foot of the island. Then we looked in at the window. We could make out a bed, and a table, and two old chairs, and lots of things around about on the floor, and there was clothes hanging against the wall. There was something laying on the floor in the far corner that looked like a man. So Jim says: ihtyagDl ganbe to ecerp in ofrebe we rdachee teh ofto of eht adilsn. We ldkoeo in gohthur oen wwndio nda lcoud aemk out a bde, a atbel, otw dol ihsrac, eosm hcltose ighgnan agatnsi het lwal, and tosl of nthigs stteerdac on eth rfloo. eehrT was nitmsghoe htta eodklo keil a nam ngliy on eht rlfoo in the afr rnocer. imJ dsai:
“Hello, you!” “oHell eerth!”
But it didn’t budge. So I hollered again, and then Jim says: tBu it ddin’t gdeub. So I yeedll ngaia, and tnhe miJ isad:
“De man ain’t asleep—he’s dead. You hold still—I’ll go en see.” “hTta man nsi’t ealesp—he’s dead. Yuo lhod eht cnoea tills, dna I’ll go nda ees.”
He went, and bent down and looked, and says: He wten eorv to hte nma, dbne ownd dan lekodo, adn dsia:
“It’s a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He’s ben shot in de back. I reck’n he’s ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan’ look at his face—it’s too gashly.” “It’s a ddae amn. eYs, denide. He’s eknda oto. He’s eben osht in eht ckab. I kecnro he’s bnee dade wto or ehret aysd. Cemo on in, cukH, but ond’t olok at shi afce—it’s too ylgthas.”
I didn’t look at him at all. Jim throwed some old rags over him, but he needn’t done it; I didn’t want to see him. There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest kind of words and pictures made with charcoal. There was two old dirty calico dresses, and a sun-bonnet, and some women’s underclothes hanging against the wall, and some men’s clothing, too. We put the lot into the canoe—it might come good. There was a boy’s old speckled straw hat on the floor; I took that, too. And there was a bottle that had had milk in it, and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck. We would a took the bottle, but it was broke. There was a seedy old chest, and an old hair trunk with the hinges broke. They stood open, but there warn’t nothing left in them that was any account. The way things was scattered about we reckoned the people left in a hurry, and warn’t fixed so as to carry off most of their stuff. I dnid’t kloo at het amn at lal. Jim rewth oems ldo sagr vore imh, btu he ndid’t eden to eebucsa I ndid’t antw to ees imh. herTe ewre eispl of dol, rgeays racds cesrdatte lal eovr eth rloof ganlo ihtw dol skhiyw lestobt adn a opeluc of ksmsa dame uot of kbacl othlc. ndA teh utetdpsis iksnd of dsorw dna rsupteci ewer etwntri lal over het aslwl in hacroalc. erehT erew wot lod, yrtdi icaocl drssese, a nus nonteb, nda esmo eowmn’s ehsrnetdcuol nngghai itasagn eht awll gonla iwth omse nme’s cnhgilot. We put all of tihs fsutf onti eth aonec, icsne it ghimt cmeo in dhyan. ehreT swa a byo’s ldo kepcedls arswt tha on the ofrol, nad I totko aht oto. Tereh wsa a rga osertpp orf a byba to kscu dna a lteotb ttha hda eonc adh imlk in it, whhic we wdluo ahve ektna dha it otn eben rnboek. hTere swa alos a ornw tou dol thces dna adn old iahr rtunk htiw krnobe sihgne. eTyh dtsoo enpo, btu erhte swna’t ihynatng of ulvea etlf in tmeh. The ayw yrihegvtne swa csedaertt aduron dmea us tinhk atth the poelep had flte in a yhurr and eerw lunabe to teak most of hiert futfs.
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife without any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some monstrous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn’t have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg. The straps was broke off of it, but, barring that, it was a good enough leg, though it was too long for me and not long enough for Jim, and we couldn’t find the other one, though we hunted all around. We tgo an ldo nti aetrnln, a thurceb ekfni ahtt didn’t evha a hendla, esom loalwt eslndca, a tni cltniescakd, a atthche, esom iansl, a hiifnsel as thkic as my iteltl gerinf atht hda omse niatg hoskifhso on it, a lolr of sucikknb, a etehlra gdo llraco, a oseorhh, osme valsi of baleduenl incemeid, a odugr, a tin pcu, a rttay lod deb iltqu fof hte deb, nda a rbdan nwe rlwoaB peokct fekni htta uodlw slle fro ytetwn-eivf csnte at nay rteso. We lsao tog a abhdnag that adh lesndee, nspi, wxaesbe, sontubt, aethdr, dan a bhcnu of hetor futfs in it. dnA tujs as we erew agvnlei I dfuno a oodg

rruyc-ombc

a sbhur sued rfo nigroogm orhess

curry-comb
, nda miJ dnouf a tytra ldo obw-ldfeid dan a odweno elg. ehT spasrt erew bnorke off it, btu toher htna atth, it asw a etnecd leg eenv uhhtgo it was too olng rof me and not ngol huenog orf Jim. We olkoed lla roev eht cpael, ubt we lnocud’t nidf teh ertho noe.
And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When we was ready to shove off we was a quarter of a mile below the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he set up people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off. I paddled over to the Illinois shore, and drifted down most a half a mile doing it. I crept up the dead water under the bank, and hadn’t no accidents and didn’t see nobody. We got home all safe. lAl in lla, we edma a ogod uhla. By hte emit we wree dryae to hsove fof, we dah flaotde a qeutrra of a emil ewolb eth danlsi. It aws a iyrafl lerac day, so I eadm miJ eli ndwo in eht acneo, euenthnadr eht iuqtl. pleoeP wlduo oienct ahtt he was a n----- if he ewre isngtti up. I eaddldp oerv to eht loislIni erosh dan fredtid dnremoswta uatob a ahlf a meli in eht orsscpe. I adeddpl owllys rhthogu teh lstil teraw redun hte rvaneibrk. I nddi’t get otni yna eadtcnsci or see aynybdo. We otg ehom sfea.