Henry IV Part 2

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 2 Scene 1

page Act 2 Scene 1 Page 5

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such poor people, saying that ere long they should call me
85madam? And didst thou not kiss me and bid me fetch thee
thirty shillings? I put thee now to thy book-oath. Deny it if
thou canst.
when she left, didn’t you tell me to stop being friends with low types like her, because before long we’d be married and I’d be a proper lady? And didn’t you kiss me and tell me to lend you thirty

shillings

shillings = unit of currency

shillings
? Put your hand on the bible and deny it, if you dare.

FALSTAFF

My lord, this is a poor mad soul, and she says up and down
the town that her eldest son is like you. She hath been in good
90case, and the truth is, poverty hath distracted her. But, for
these foolish officers, I beseech you I may have redress
against them.

FALSTAFF

Sir, this is a poor, insane soul. She’s been saying all over town that her oldest son looks just like you. She was once rich, but poverty has driven her crazy. Now, as for these two foolish officers, I would like to press charges against them.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Sir John, Sir John, I am well acquainted with your manner
of wrenching the true cause the false way. It is not a
95confident brow, nor the throng of words that come with such
more than impudent sauciness from you, can thrust me from
a level consideration. You have, as it appears to me,
practiced upon the easy-yielding spirit of this woman, and
made her serve your uses both in purse and in person.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Sir John, Sir John. I know too well how you are accustomed to turning the truth into a big lie. But neither your confident demeanor nor the storm of words that accompanies your insolent disrespect will sway me from making a just consideration. As far as I can see, you’ve taken advantage of this trusting woman, and you’ve made her give you cash and other favors.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

100Yea, in truth, my lord.

MISTRESS QUICKLY

Yes, truthfully, sir.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Pray thee, peace.— (to FALSTAFF) Pay her the debt you owe
her, and unpay the villany you have done her. The one you
may do with sterling money, and the other with current
repentance.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Quiet, please. (to FALSTAFF) Pay her what you owe her, and undo the wrongdoings you’ve done to her. You can do the first with money, and the second with a sincere apology.

FALSTAFF

105My lord, I will not undergo this sneap without reply. You call
honorable boldness “impudent sauciness.” If a man will
make curtsy and say nothing, he is virtuous. No, my lord, my
humble duty remembered, I will not be your suitor. I say to
you, I do desire deliverance from these officers, being upon
110hasty employment in the King’s affairs.

FALSTAFF

Sir, I will not put up with this snub without a reply. You call my brave, honorable dealings insolent disrespect. Does a man have to stand here, silent and bowing, to be a virtuous man? No, sir. With all due respect, I won’t bow down to you. I say that I want to be set free by these officers, seeing as I have urgent work to do for the King.

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