Henry IV Part 2

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 3 Scene 2

page Act 3 Scene 2 Page 12

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charge you and discharge you with the motion of a
pewterer’s hammer, come off and on swifter than he that
gibbets on the brewer’s bucket. And this same half-faced
230fellow, Shadow, give me this man. He presents no mark to
the enemy. The foeman may with as great aim level at the
edge of a penknife. And for a retreat, how swiftly will this
Feeble the woman’s tailor, run off! O, give me the spare
men, and spare me the great ones.—Put me a caliver into
235Wart’s hand, Bardolph.
strength, height, bulk, and overall size? Give me his spirit, Master Shallow! Take a look at Wart. You see how ragged he looks? He can load and fire steadily—as steadily as a tinsmith’s hammer. He can advance and regroup fast—faster than a brewer’s delivery pail can be refilled. And this skinny guy, Shadow—give me this man. He offers no target to the enemy. The enemy might as well try aiming at a knife’s edge. And as for retreating, Feeble, the woman’s tailor, will run faster than you can imagine. Oh, give me the spare men and spare me the great ones! Bardolph, give Wart a musket.

BARDOLPH

Hold, Wart. Traverse. Thas, thas, thas.

BARDOLPH

Here you go, Wart. Present arms! Right shoulder, arms! Left shoulder, arms!

FALSTAFF

Come, manage me your caliver: so, very well, go to, very
good, exceeding good. O, give me always a little, lean, old,
chopped, bald shot. Well said, i' faith, Wart. Th' art a good
240scab. Hold, there’s a tester for thee.

FALSTAFF

Come on, handle your weapon. Yes, good. Very good. Very, very good. Oh, give me a little, skinny, old, dried-out, bald rifleman any day. Good job, Wart. You’re a good scab of a guy. Wait, here’s a

tester

tester = sixpence

tester
for you.

SHALLOW

He is not his craft’s master. He doth not do it right. I
remember at Mile End Green, when I lay at Clement’s Inn—
I was then Sir Dagonet in Arthur’s show—there was a little
quiver fellow, and he would manage you his piece thus. And
245he would about and about, and come you in, and come you
in. “Rah, tah, tah,” would he say. “Bounce,” would he say,
and away again would he go, and again would he come. I
shall ne'er see such a fellow.

SHALLOW

He’s no expert. He’s not doing it right. I remember up at Mile-End Park, when I was at Clement’s Inn—I played the fool in the archery pageant. There was a nimble little guy, and he would handle his weapon like this, and he would run all over the place, and he’d charge and charge. “Rat-a-tat tat,” he’d say. “Bang!” he’d say. Then he’d run away, then come back. I never saw anybody like him.

FALSTAFF

These fellows will do well, Master Shallow.—God keep
250you, Master Silence. I will not use many words with you.
Fare you well, gentlemen both. I thank you. I must a dozen
mile to-night.—Bardolph, give the soldiers coats.

FALSTAFF

These guys will be fine, Master Shallow. God bless you, Master Silence—I won’t say much to you. Farewell, gentlemen, and thank you. I have to march twelve miles tonight. Bardolph, give the soldiers uniforms.

SHALLOW

Sir John, the Lord bless you. God prosper your affairs. God
send us peace. At your return, visit our house. Let our old

SHALLOW

God bless you, Sir John. May God bring you good luck, and bring us peace. When you come back, pay us

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