Henry IV Part 2

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 4 Scene 1

page Act 4 Scene 1 Page 12

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WESTMORELAND

I pledge your Grace, and if you knew what pains
I have bestowed to breed this present peace,
You would drink freely. But my love to you
305Shall show itself more openly hereafter.

WESTMORELAND

I drink to your grace. If you knew how hard I’ve worked to bring about this peaceful resolution, you’d really drink up. But my love for you will be more apparent from now on.

ARCHBISHOP

I do not doubt you.

ARCHBISHOP

I don’t doubt it.

WESTMORELAND

   I am glad of it.—
Health to my lord and gentle cousin, Mowbray.

WESTMORELAND

I’m glad. And here’s to your health, my gentle cousin Lord Mowbray.

MOWBRAY

You wish me health in very happy season,
For I am on the sudden something ill.

MOWBRAY

You wish me good health at a very good moment, because for some reason I’m suddenly feeling ill.

ARCHBISHOP

310Against ill chances men are ever merry,
But heaviness foreruns the good event.

ARCHBISHOP

Men are always merry in the face of bad situations, but a heavy heart predicts a happy event.

WESTMORELAND

Therefore be merry, coz; since sudden sorrow
Serves to say thus: “Some good thing comes tomorrow.”

WESTMORELAND

So be happy, kinsman. A sudden feeling of melancholy is just a sign that says, “Something good is coming tomorrow.”

ARCHBISHOP

Believe me, I am passing light in spirit.

ARCHBISHOP

Believe me, I’m in really good spirits.

MOWBRAY

315So much the worse if your own rule be true.

MOWBRAY

Which is not a good thing, if your own rule is correct.
Shouts within
Shouts are heard offstage.

LANCASTER

The word of peace is rendered. Hark how they shout.

LANCASTER

The news of peace has been announced. Listen to them shout!

MOWBRAY

This had been cheerful after victory.

MOWBRAY

They sound like they are cheering a victory.

ARCHBISHOP

A peace is of the nature of a conquest,
For then both parties nobly are subdued,
320And neither party loser.

ARCHBISHOP

Peace is a victory of sorts: both sides stop fighting honorably, but neither loses.

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