Artboard Created with Sketch. Close Search Dialog
! Error Created with Sketch.

Henry IV Part 2

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 5 Scene 1
No Fear Act 5 Scene 1 Page 2

Original Text

Modern Text

SHALLOW

Let it be cast and paid.—Sir John, you shall not be excused.

SHALLOW

Check the figures and then and pay it. Sir John, you will not be excused.

DAVY

Now, sir, a new link to the bucket must needs be had. And,
sir, do you mean to stop any of William’s wages about the
20sack he lost the other day at Hinckley Fair?

DAVY

Now, sir, we need some new chain for the bucket. And sir, do you plan to dock William’s pay for the wine he lost at the Hinckley fair?

SHALLOW

He shall answer it. Some pigeons, Davy, a couple of short-
legged hens, a joint of mutton, and any pretty little tiny kickshaws, tell William cook.

SHALLOW

He’ll pay for that. Some pigeons, Davy; a couple of short-legged hens, a leg of lamb, and any fun little fancy dishes. Tell William the cook.

DAVY

Doth the man of war stay all night, sir?

DAVY

Is the soldier staying all night?

SHALLOW

Yea, Davy. I will use him well. A friend i' th' court is better
25than a penny in purse. Use his men well, Davy, for they are
arrant knaves and will backbite.

SHALLOW

Yes, Davy. I’ll take good care of him. A friend at court is better than money in your pocket. Take good care of his men, Davy. They’re good-for-nothings, and they’ll bite you.

DAVY

No worse than they are back-bitten, sir, for they have
marvellous foul linen.

DAVY

No worse than they’re bitten, sir. Their clothes are full of lice.

SHALLOW

Well-conceited, Davy. About thy business, Davy.

SHALLOW

Good one, Davy. Get on with your work, Davy.

DAVY

30I beseech you, sir, to countenance William Visor of Woncot
against Clement Perkes o' th' hill.

DAVY

Please, sir, rule in favor of William Visor of Woncot in his lawsuit against Clement Perkes of the hill.

SHALLOW

There is many complaints, Davy, against that Visor. That
Visor is an arrant knave, on my knowledge.

SHALLOW

Davy, there are a lot of suits against that Visor. That Visor is a good-for-nothing, as best I can tell.

DAVY

I grant your Worship that he is a knave, sir, but yet, God
35forbid, sir, but a knave should have some countenance at his
friend’s request. An honest man, sir, is able to speak for
himself when a knave is not. I have served your Worship
truly, sir, this eight years; an if I cannot once or twice in a
quarter bear out a knave against an honest man, I have

DAVY

I agree with your honor that he’s a good-for-nothing, but God forbid that a good-for-nothing should be denied a favor when his friend asks for one on his behalf. An honest man can speak for himself, but a good-for-nothing can’t. I’ve worked for you for eight years, sir. If I can’t get you to rule in favor of a good-

Popular pages: Henry IV Part 2