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Henry IV Part 2

William Shakespeare
No Fear Act 5 Scene 1
No Fear Act 5 Scene 1 Page 3

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40a very little credit with your Worship. The knave is mine
honest friend, sir; therefore I beseech you let him be
countenanced.
for-nothing once in a while, then obviously you don’t think very much of me. That good-for-nothing is my good friend, sir. So I ask you, please: rule in his favor.

SHALLOW

Go to, I say he shall have no wrong. Look about, Davy.

SHALLOW

Stop now; I tell you he won’t be wronged. Now get going, Davy.
Exit DAVY
DAVY exits.
Where are you, Sir John? Come, come, come, off with your
45boots.—Give me your hand, Master Bardolph.
Where are you, Sir John? Come, come, come. Take
your boots off. Let me shake your hand, Master
Bardolph.

BARDOLPH

I am glad to see your Worship.

BARDOLPH

I’m glad to see you, your honor.

SHALLOW

I thank thee with all my heart, kind Master Bardolph, (to the
PAGE) and welcome, my tall fellow.—Come, Sir John.

SHALLOW

I thank you with all my heart, Master Bardolph. (to the PAGE) Welcome, you tall fellow. Come, Sir John.

FALSTAFF

I’ll follow you, good Master Robert Shallow.

FALSTAFF

I’ll be right behind you, Master Robert Shallow.
Exit SHALLOW
SHALLOW exits.
50Bardolph, look to our horses.
Bardolph, get our horses ready.
Exeunt BARDOLPH and PAGE
BARDOLPH and the PAGE exit.
If I were sawed into quantities, I should make four dozen of
such bearded hermits' staves as Master Shallow. It is a
wonderful thing to see the semblable coherence of his men’s
spirits and his. They, by observing of him, do bear
55themselves like foolish justices; he, by conversing with
them, is turned into a justice-like servingman. Their spirits
are so married in conjunction with the participation of
society that they flock together in consent like so many wild
geese. If I had a suit to Master Shallow, I would humor his
60men with the imputation of being near their master;if to his
men, I would curry with Master Shallow that no man could
better command his servants. It is certain that either wise
bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases,
one of another. Therefore let men take heed of their
65company. I will devise matter enough out of this Shallow to
If I were cut into pieces, I’d make four dozen bearded broomsticks like this Master Shallow. It’s amazing to see the similarity between his men’s dispositions and his own. They watch him and behave like foolish judges, and he, by associating with them, turns into a judge-like workman. Their spirits are so closely joined by their intimate involvement, they’re like a flock of wild geese that fly in formation. If I needed a favor from Judge Shallow, I would make his men think that I’m a close friend of his. If I needed something from his men, I would flatter Shallow by telling him that no one commands servants better than he does. One thing’s for sure: the behavior of a wise man and that of an idiot are contagious, like diseases. They spread from person to person, which is why people must be careful about

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