Henry IV Part 2

by: William Shakespeare

  Act 5 Scene 2

page Act 5 Scene 2 Page 2

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CHIEF JUSTICE

O God, I fear all will be overturned.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Oh God! I’m afraid everything will be turned upside-down.

LANCASTER

20Good morrow, cousin Warwick, good morrow.

LANCASTER

Good morning, cousin Warwick, good morning.

GLOUCESTER AND CLARENCE

Good morrow, cousin.

GLOUCESTER AND CLARENCE

Good morning, cousin.

LANCASTER

We meet like men that had forgot to speak.

LANCASTER

We’re all like men who don’t remember how to speak.

WARWICK

We do remember, but our argument
Is all too heavy to admit much talk.

WARWICK

We remember how, but what we have to say is so sad that we cannot speak.

LANCASTER

25Well, peace be with him that hath made us heavy.

LANCASTER

Well, peace be with the man who has made us sad.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Peace be with us, lest we be heavier.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Peace be with us, or else we’ll be even sadder!

GLOUCESTER

O, good my lord, you have lost a friend indeed,
And I dare swear you borrow not that face
Of seeming sorrow; it is sure your own.

GLOUCESTER

Oh, my good lord, you’ve lost a friend, indeed. I’m sure you’re not borrowing that sorrowful face; it’s certainly your own.

LANCASTER

30Though no man be assured what grace to find,
You stand in coldest expectation.
I am the sorrier; would ’twere otherwise.

LANCASTER

Even though no man can know what blessings will come his way, he must expect the worst. I am sorry; I wish it were otherwise.

CLARENCE

Well, you must now speak Sir John Falstaff fair,
Which swims against your stream of quality.

CLARENCE

Well, now you are only allowed to speak well of Sir John Falstaff, which goes against the nature of a man of your quality.

CHIEF JUSTICE

35Sweet princes, what I did I did in honor,
Led by th' impartial conduct of my soul;
And never shall you see that I will beg
A ragged and forestalled remission.
If truth and upright innocency fail me,
40I’ll to the King my master that is dead
And tell him who hath sent me after him.

CHIEF JUSTICE

Sweet princes, what I did, I did honorably, impartially, and with a clear conscience. You won’t see me begging vilely for a pardon, which is sure to be withdrawn as soon as it is given. If truth and honest innocence don’t help me, then I’ll join my dead King and tell him who sent me.

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