Election Day is November 3rd! Make sure your voice is heard
No Fear Act 2 Scene 2
No Fear Act 2 Scene 2 Page 4

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CORNWALL

Why art thou angry?

CORNWALL

Why are you enraged?

KENT

65That such a slave as this should wear a sword,
Who wears no honesty. Such smiling rogues as these,
Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain
Which are too intrinse t' unloose, smooth every passion
That in the natures of their lords rebel,
70Bring oil to fire, snow to the colder moods;
Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks
With every gale and vary of their masters,
Knowing naught, like dogs, but following.—
A plague upon your epileptic visage!
75Smile you my speeches as I were a fool?
Goose, an I had you upon Sarum plain,
I’d drive ye cackling home to Camelot.

KENT

I’m angry that a dishonorable lowlife like this wears a sword like a gentleman. Smiling swindlers such as he undo the sacred bonds that unite people together, and only encourage the unreasonable passions of their masters. They foster both rage and apathy. They say “Yes” and “No,” turning their noses whichever way the wind blows without taking a firm stance on anything. They blindly follow their masters' impulses, like dogs.—Damn your ugly stinking face! Are you laughing at what I say, as if I were a fool? If I had my way with you right now, I’d send you to back to where you came from.

CORNWALL

Why, art thou mad, old fellow?

CORNWALL

Are you insane, old man?

GLOUCESTER

(to KENT)      How fell you out?
80Say that.

GLOUCESTER

(to KENT) What did you start quarreling over? Just tell us.

KENT

No contraries hold more antipathy
Than I and such a knave.

KENT

I couldn’t hate that jerk over there any more than I do.

CORNWALL

Why dost thou call him “knave”? What’s his offense?

CORNWALL

Why are you calling him a jerk? What did he do to you?

KENT

His countenance likes me not.

KENT

I don’t like his face.

CORNWALL

85No more perchance does mine, nor his, nor hers.

CORNWALL

But maybe you don’t like mine, or his, or hers either.

KENT

Sir, ’tis my occupation to be plain.
I have seen better faces in my time
Than stands on any shoulder that I see
Before me at this instant.

KENT

I’m used to telling the truth, sir, and I have to say that I’ve seen better faces than those I see here.