Election Day is November 3rd! Make sure your voice is heard
No Fear Act 2 Scene 2
No Fear Act 2 Scene 2 Page 5

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CORNWALL

   This is some fellow,
90Who, having been praised for bluntness, doth affect
A saucy roughness and constrains the garb
Quite from his nature. He cannot flatter, he.
An honest mind and plain, he must speak truth.
An they will take it, so. If not, he’s plain.
95These kind of knaves I know, which in this plainness
Harbor more craft and more corrupter ends
Than twenty silly-ducking observants
That stretch their duties nicely.

CORNWALL

This is a guy who’s been praised for his honest bluntness, and who now insolently pretends to be plainspoken and twists the natural meanings of words. No flattery for him, no sir! He’s honest, he’s got to speak the truth. If people take what he says, fine. If not, he’s got truth on his side! I know his type. He’s sneaky behind all his so-called bluntness, sneakier than twenty brown-nosing bootlickers who only tell you what you want to hear.

KENT

Sir, in good faith, or in sincere verity,
100Under th' allowance of your great aspect,
Whose influence, like the wreath of radiant fire
On flickering Phoebus' front—

KENT

Dearest, kindest, most honorable sir, may I say, with your esteemed approval, which is lit up by the illuminating radiance of the sun-god Phoebus, that—

CORNWALL

     What mean’st by this?

CORNWALL

What do you mean by that?

KENT

To go out of my dialect, which you discommend so much. I know, sir, I am no flatterer. He that beguiled you in a plain accent was a plain knave, which for my part I will not be, though I should win your displeasure to entreat me to ’t.

KENT

I tried to stop speaking plainly, since you dislike plain speech so much. Sir, I know I’m not a flatterer. The guy who tricked you with plain language was just a plain crook—which I’m not, however much I may displease you by not being one.

CORNWALL

(to OSWALD) What was th' offense you gave him?

CORNWALL

(to OSWALD) How did you offend him?

OSWALD

     I never gave him any.
It pleased the king his master very late
To strike at me upon his misconstruction
110When he, conjunct and flattering his displeasure,
Tripped me behind; being down, insulted, railed,
And put upon him such a deal of man
That worthied him, got praises of the king
For him attempting who was self-subdued.
115And in the fleshment of this dread exploit
Drew on me here again.

OSWALD

I never offended him at all. Recently, the king hit me because of a misunderstanding. This man took sides with the king and tripped me. When I was down on the ground he insulted me, and then started acting tough to seem courageous in front of the king. The king praised him, even though I had never offered any resistance at all. Now he pulled out his sword on me again, still riled up from our first encounter.