No Fear Act 4 Scene 1
No Fear Act 4 Scene 1 Page 3

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EDGAR

(aside)
     How should this be?
Bad is the trade that must play fool to sorrow,
45Angering itself and others.—Bless thee, master!

EDGAR

(to himself) What’s going on? I hate pretending I’m a wandering beggar when all I want to do now is comfort my poor father.—Bless you, master.

GLOUCESTER

Is that the naked fellow?

GLOUCESTER

Is that the naked guy?

OLD MAN

   Ay, my lord.

OLD MAN

Yes, my lord.

GLOUCESTER

Then prithee, get thee gone. If for my sake
Thou wilt o'ertake us hence a mile or twain
I' th' way toward Dover, do it for ancient love.
50And bring some covering for this naked soul,
Which I’ll entreat to lead me.

GLOUCESTER

(to the OLD MAN) Then please go. If you’re willing to do me a favor, as an old friend, then catch up to us a mile or two further on the way to Dover, and bring some clothes for this poor beggar. I’ll ask him to be my guide.

OLD MAN

     Alack, sir, he is mad.

OLD MAN

But sir, he’s crazy.

GLOUCESTER

'Tis the time’s plague when madmen lead the blind.
Do as I bid thee. Or rather, do thy pleasure.
Above the rest, be gone.

GLOUCESTER

It’s the tragedy of our times that lunatics must lead the blind. Do as I asked you. Or rather, do what you feel like doing. But above all, get out of here.

OLD MAN

55I’ll bring him the best 'parel that I have,
Come on ’t what will.

OLD MAN

I’ll bring the crazy beggar the best clothes I have, no matter what happens.
Exit OLD MAN
He exits.

GLOUCESTER

   Sirrah, naked fellow—

GLOUCESTER

Hey, naked guy—

EDGAR

Poor Tom’s a-cold.
(aside) I cannot daub it further.

EDGAR

Poor Tom’s chilly. (to himself) I can’t play this role any longer.

GLOUCESTER

Come hither, fellow.

GLOUCESTER

Come here, man.

EDGAR

60 (aside) And yet I must.—Bless thy sweet eyes, they bleed.

EDGAR

(to himself) But I must.—Bless you, sir. Your dear eyes are bleeding.

GLOUCESTER

Know’st thou the way to Dover?

GLOUCESTER

Do you know the way to Dover?