No Fear Act 4 Scene 6
No Fear Act 4 Scene 6 Page 4

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EDGAR

   This is above all strangeness.
Upon the crown o' th' cliff, what thing was that
70Which parted from you?

EDGAR

This is beyond weird. What was that thing I saw moving away from you up on the cliff before you fell?

GLOUCESTER

   A poor unfortunate beggar.

GLOUCESTER

That was a poor unlucky beggar.

EDGAR

As I stood here below, methought his eyes
Were two full moons. He had a thousand noses,
Horns whelked and waved like the enragèd sea.
It was some fiend. Therefore, thou happy father,
75Think that the clearest gods, who make them honors
Of men’s impossibilities, have preserved thee.

EDGAR

From down here, I thought his eyes looked like full moons. He had a thousand noses and twisted horns, like wave crests in a storm at sea. It was some devil. You lucky old man, it seems that the gods have saved your life. They love to perform miracles so that humans will worship them.

GLOUCESTER

I do remember now. Henceforth I’ll bear
Affliction till it do cry out itself,
“Enough, enough,” and die. That thing you speak of,
80I took it for a man. Often ’twould say,
“The fiend, the fiend!” He led me to that place.

GLOUCESTER

I understand now. From now on I’ll put up with my anguish until the anguish itself cries out, “Enough, enough!” and disappears. I thought that thing you’re talking about was a man. It would often talk about the devil. It took me to that deadly place.

EDGAR

Bear free and patient thoughts.

EDGAR

Cheer up and be at peace.
Enter LEAR, mad
LEAR enters, insane.
     But who comes here?
The safer sense will ne'er accommodate
His master thus.
But who is that? A sane person would never dress like this.

LEAR

85No, they cannot touch me for coining. I am the king himself.

LEAR

No, they can’t accuse me of counterfeiting coins. I’m the king himself.

EDGAR

(aside) O thou side-piercing sight!

EDGAR

(to himself) Oh, what a heartbreaking sight!

LEAR

Nature’s above art in that respect. There’s your press- money. That fellow handles his bow like a crowkeeper. Draw me a clothier’s yard. Look, look, a mouse! Peace,

LEAR

Life’s better at

breaking hearts

Lear’s insane speeches are full of non sequiturs and difficult to follow.

breaking hearts
than art is.—Hey, a new recruit. Here’s your enlistment bonus.—Look how awkwardly he handles his crossbow.—Come on, pull it back farther!—Look, look, a mouse! Calm down, this