King Lear

by: William Shakespeare

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Modern Text

REGAN
300'Tis the infirmity of his age. Yet he hath ever but slenderly known himself.
REGAN
He’s going senile. But then again he’s never really understood his own feelings very well.
GONERIL
The best and soundest of his time hath been but rash. Then must we look from his age to receive not alone the imperfections of long-engrafted condition, but therewithal the unruly waywardness that infirm and choleric years bring with them.
GONERIL
Yes, he was hotheaded even in the prime of his life. Now that he’s old, we can expect to have to deal not only with his old character flaws, which have turned into deep-rooted habits, but also with the uncontrollable crabbiness that comes with old age.
REGAN
Such unconstant starts are we like to have from him as this of Kent’s banishment.
REGAN
We’ll probably witness many more outbursts from him, like banishing Kent.
GONERIL
There is further compliment of leave-taking between France and him. Pray you, let’s sit together. If our father carry authority with such dispositions as he bears, this last surrender of his will but offend us.
GONERIL
There’s still the King of France’s farewell ceremony. Let’s put our heads together. If our father continues to use his authority as usual, then his recent abdication of the kingdom will just hurt us.
REGAN
We shall further think on ’t.
REGAN
We’ll have to think about it carefully.
GONERIL
We must do something, and i' th' heat.
GONERIL
We have to strike while the iron’s hot.
Exeunt
They exit.

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