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No Fear Act 5 Scene 3
No Fear Act 5 Scene 3 Page 7

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EDGAR

   O, know, my name is lost.
By treason’s tooth bare-gnawn and canker-bit.
130Yet am I noble as the adversary
I come to cope withal.

EDGAR

I’ve lost my name and title to a traitor. But I’m as noble as my opponent.

ALBANY

   Which is that adversary?

ALBANY

And who is that?

EDGAR

What’s he that speaks for Edmund, Earl of Gloucester?

EDGAR

Who’s the spokesman for Edmund, Earl of Gloucester?

EDMUND

Himself. What sayst thou to him?

EDMUND

I’m my own spokesman. What do you have to say to me?

EDGAR

     Draw thy sword,
That if my speech offend a noble heart
135Thy arm may do thee justice. (draws his sword) Here is mine.
Behold: it is the privilege of mine honors,
My oath, and my profession. I protest—
Maugre thy strength, youth, place, and eminence,
Despite thy victor sword and fire-new fortune,
140Thy valor and thy heart—thou art a traitor,
False to thy gods, thy brother, and thy father,
Conspirant 'gainst this high illustrious prince,
And from th' extremest upward of thy head
To the descent and dust below thy foot
145A most toad-spotted traitor. Say thou “No,”
This sword, this arm, and my best spirits are bent
To prove upon thy heart, whereto I speak,
Thou liest.

EDGAR

Draw your sword. If I offend you by what I say, you can use your sword to take revenge. Here’s mine. (he draws his sword) Look at it. It’s the symbol of my honor, my rank, and my status as a knight. In spite of your youth, rank, strength, and excellence at warfare, in spite of your courage, your recent victory, and your good luck, I declare that you’re a traitor. You’ve betrayed your gods, your brother, and your father. You’ve plotted against this noble duke. You’re a rotten traitor, through and through, from the top of your head to the soles of your feet. If you disagree with me, I’m ready to use this sword and my courage to prove that you’re a liar.

EDMUND

   In wisdom I should ask thy name.
But since thy outside looks so fair and warlike,
150And that thy tongue some say of breeding breathes,
What safe and nicely I might well delay
By rule of knighthood, I disdain and spurn.
Back do I toss these treasons to thy head,
With the hell-hated lie o'erwhelm thy heart—

EDMUND

Normally I would ask you what your name is first. But since you look so fine and noble, and since you’re so well mannered in your speech, I’m prepared to overlook the rules of knighthood, which say I should refuse to fight a man I don’t know. I throw your accusations back in your face. Your lies can hardly hurt me, but I’ll