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  Act 2 Scene 3

page Act 2 Scene 3 Page 4

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Enter LORD BERKELEY
LORD BERKELEY enters.

NORTHUMBERLAND

It is my Lord of Berkeley, as I guess.

NORTHUMBERLAND

I think it’s the Lord of Berkeley.

LORD BERKELEY

70My Lord of Hereford, my message is to you.

LORD BERKELEY

Lord of Hereford, I have a message for you.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

My lord, my answer is—to Lancaster;
And I am come to seek that name in England;
And I must find that title in your tongue,
Before I make reply to aught you say.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

My lord, I will answer only to my proper name, the Duke of Lancaster. And I have come to claim that name here in England. I must hear you call me that title before I respond to anything else you say.

LORD BERKELEY

75Mistake me not, my lord; ’tis not my meaning
To raze one title of your honour out:
To you, my lord, I come, what lord you will,
From the most gracious regent of this land,
The Duke of York, to know what pricks you on
80To take advantage of the absent time
And fright our native peace with self-born arms.

LORD BERKELEY

Don’t misunderstand, my lord. It’s not my intention to deny you your title. I’ve come to you, my lord—whatever title you want me to use—from the most gracious regent in this land, that is the Duke of York. I need to know what has led you to exploit the absence of our king and jeopardize the peace in this land with your armies.
Enter DUKE OF YORK attended
The DUKE OF YORK and his assistants enter.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

I shall not need transport my words by you;
Here comes his grace in person. My noble uncle!

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

(to Lord Berkeley) I won’t have to pass my message through you. Here comes his grace in person. (to the Duke of York) My noble uncle!
Kneels
HENRY BOLINGBROKE kneels.

DUKE OF YORK

Show me thy humble heart, and not thy knee,
85Whose duty is deceiveable and false.

DUKE OF YORK

I don’t want to see you kneeling. I know you don’t really honor me.

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

My gracious uncle—

HENRY BOLINGBROKE

My gracious uncle—

DUKE OF YORK

Tut, tut!
Grace me no grace, nor uncle me no uncle:
I am no traitor’s uncle; and that word ‘grace.’
90In an ungracious mouth is but profane.
Why have those banish’d and forbidden legs
Dared once to touch a dust of England’s ground?
But then more ‘why?’ why have they dared to march
So many miles upon her peaceful bosom,
95Frighting her pale-faced villages with war
And ostentation of despised arms?
Comest thou because the anointed king is hence?
Why, foolish boy, the king is left behind,
And in my loyal bosom lies his power.
100Were I but now the lord of such hot youth
As when brave Gaunt, thy father, and myself
Rescued the Black Prince, that young Mars of men,
From forth the ranks of many thousand French,
O, then how quickly should this arm of mine.
105Now prisoner to the palsy, chastise thee
And minister correction to thy fault!

DUKE OF YORK

Tsk, tsk! Don’t call me grace, and don’t call me uncle. I am not the uncle of a traitor, and it’s obscene to use that word “grace” when everybody knows you’re ungracious. You were banished, so why have you come back to England? Why have you and your army marched miles across peaceful England, scaring villagers with threats of war and displays of hateful weapons? Have you come now because the king is away? Why, you foolish boy, don’t you know that the king has put me in charge while he’s away and that I am loyal to him? If I were still the strong young man who, with your father, John of Gaunt, rescued the king’s father from thousands of French soldiers, I would quickly smack you. But my arm is too weak and shaky to administer punishment in that way.

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